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DateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("EEE MMM d HH:mm:ss z yyyy");

sdf.parse("Sun Dec 13 10:00:00 UTC 2009")

result

java.text.ParseException: Unparseable date: Sun Dec 13 10:00:00 UTC 2009

Note: This code seems to work in a normal Java application but seems to fail on Android.

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1  
try setting locale –  Jigar Joshi Nov 8 '11 at 9:58
    
btw, i always find these kind of question quite unworthy for a SO, is it better to remove these kind type of questions after i've found a solution? –  Sander Versluys Nov 8 '11 at 10:02
    
There is a duplicate exist for this I know , Check this –  Jigar Joshi Nov 8 '11 at 10:05
    
what is your Java version and locale? to me, new SimpleDateFormat("EEE MMM d HH:mm:ss z yyyy").parse("Sun Dec 13 10:00:00 UTC 2009") outputs date without exception –  gnat Nov 8 '11 at 10:15
    
just for testing, doing the inverse can be useful: System.out.println(sdf.format(new Date())) –  Carlos Heuberger Nov 8 '11 at 10:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It doesn't for me - perhaps your default locale uses different month names? Specify the locale for the format.

// Will definitely work
DateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("EEE MMM d HH:mm:ss z yyyy",
                                      Locale.US);

// Will definitely not work
DateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("EEE MMM d HH:mm:ss z yyyy",
                                      Locale.FRANCE);

// Might work - depends on default locale
DateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("EEE MMM d HH:mm:ss z yyyy")

(The problem is the names of the days of the week and months of the year, which are obviously culture-specific. Date and time separators can vary too.)

EDIT: It's odd that you're still having problems. Just to check, please try to run the following short but complete program:

import java.text.DateFormat;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Locale;

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {        
        DateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("EEE MMM d HH:mm:ss z yyyy",
                                              Locale.US);
        sdf.parse("Sun Dec 13 10:00:00 UTC 2009");
    }
}

If that doesn't work, try taking out the time zone part of both the pattern and the text. I wonder whether it's having problems with that.

EDIT: If the Android SimpleDateFormat implementation doesn't manage to parse the time zone, you can probably just use:

text = text.replace(" UTC ", " ");
Date parsed = sdf.parse(text);

... having set the time zone on the parser to UTC, of course. You probably want to check that it contains " UTC " first, just in case your data format changes.

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aha right, good idea! ;) it data retrieved from a remote server, so maybe different locale... –  Sander Versluys Nov 8 '11 at 9:59
    
really strange but it doesn't work for me, not for Locale.US or Locale.ENGLISH... –  Sander Versluys Nov 8 '11 at 10:17
1  
Locale.getDefault() returns 'en_NL' –  Sander Versluys Nov 8 '11 at 10:17
    
That will explain. Note that NL cab be particularly tricky for months, as it will can work with English months for about half a year until it runs into a month that does not work. –  Thirler Nov 8 '11 at 10:22
    
@SanderVersluys: That's odd. See my edit. –  Jon Skeet Nov 8 '11 at 10:23

Your format looks correct. Is it possible that you are not using an English Locale though? The formatter will take your system locale and this could result in different names for 'sun' and 'dec'

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