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I'm having trouble getting the C# compiler to call an extension method I created, since its preferring an instance method with a params argument instead.

For example, say I have the following class and its method:

public class C
{
    public void Trace(string format, params object[] args)
    {
         Console.WriteLine("Called instance method.");
    }
}

And and extension:

public static class CExtensions
{
    public void Trace(this C @this, string category, string message, params Tuple<string, decimal>[] indicators)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Called extension method.");
    }
}

In my sample program:

pubic void Main()
{
    var c = new C();

    c.Trace("Message");
    c.Trace("Message: {0}", "foo");
    c.Trace("Category", "Message", new KeyValuePair<string, decimal>("key", 123));
}

All calls print Called instance method..

I do not have access to class C, obviously, or I wouldn't bother creating extension methods, and my extension is important because it would allow my users to continue using a class that they already know with some added value.

From what I've understood, the compiler will favor instance methods over extension methods, but is this the only rule? That would mean that any class with a method that looks like Method(string format, params object[] args) cannot have extension methods with a first parameter of type string.

Any explanation on the reasons for this behavior or a way to work around it (that is not "simply call CExtensions.Trace(c, "Category", ...") would be greatly appreciated.

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I've come across this before. Seems the only solution is to rename the method. I'd be interested to see if there's a fix. –  Polynomial Nov 8 '11 at 10:09
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't use extensions to "take over" existing class methods.

If the call works without the extension, the behaviour should not change when you add the extension. The reason for this is that existing code should not break by introducing an extension later on.

You have to use a different name for it, or use parameter types different from the class method.

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Although many people gave good suggestions of workarounds (even though none worked for me) I consider this the best answer since it summarizes perfectly where my problem comes from. –  madd0 Nov 9 '11 at 12:34
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You cannot directly. A method on the target instance is always preferred over an extension method. The only way to do this (while keeping the names the same etc) is to use the CExtensions.Trace approach (in the question).

In some cases, a trick here would be to use some base-class of C or interface that C implements, but which does not have a Trace method, and re-type the variable, and add an overload on CExtensions, i.e.

IFoo foo = c;
foo.Trace(...);
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I like the trick of adding the extension method to a base type. Of course, that would've been too easy and, in my case, I'd have to extend object... –  madd0 Nov 8 '11 at 10:41
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Tuple<string, decimal> is not the same as KeyValuePair<string, decimal>. Hence KeyValuePair<string, decimal> passed in is taken just as an object hence member method with params object[] args is used.

In fact KeyValuePair is a structure.

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Tuple or KeyValuePair, it doesn't really change much, both types—_any_ type for that matter—will be "absorbed" by the object array. –  madd0 Nov 8 '11 at 10:19
    
That's true, but if you use a Tuple<string, decimal> in the call it will still not use the extension method. –  Guffa Nov 8 '11 at 10:20
    
Yes, I just tested and it is not using it. –  Aliostad Nov 8 '11 at 10:22
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You can do it with named arguments:

c.Trace(
    "Category", 
    "Message", 
    indicators: new Tuple<string, decimal>("key", 123));

but you loose the params functionality and you would need to explicitly pass an array for the indicators argument, like the following:

c.Trace(
    "Category",
    "Message",
    indicators: new Tuple<string, decimal>[] 
    {
        new Tuple<string, decimal>("key", 123),
        new Tuple<string, decimal>("key2", 123)
    });
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it will work, but its easy to forget this named argument and we will be silently calling default version with no way to notice this. –  Valentin Kuzub Nov 8 '11 at 10:16
    
@Valentin Kuzub, but other options are also error prone. You may forget you need to call the method with the different name or different signature. –  João Angelo Nov 8 '11 at 10:18
    
João's argument is exactly why I wouldn't want to change the method's name or signature, but Valentin's right: it's extremely likely that one would forget to use the named argument and call the default version without ever noticing (or only when it's too late). –  madd0 Nov 8 '11 at 10:23
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I guess you could change first parameter type, or function name (TraceFormat?)

This params version looks very greedy, so if you preserve first argument as string it will always catch all calls and ignore extension method I believe.

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I really don't want to change the method name, because it's something that the developers are used to. Changing the name would mean the method would not be used as we'd like. Changing the type of the first argument to something other than string would be difficult, since I really want a category name as a string. –  madd0 Nov 8 '11 at 10:21
    
actually first argument as Category sounds like it could be a good candidate to become an Enum for example and it will start working. –  Valentin Kuzub Nov 8 '11 at 10:29
    
Valentin, nice try, but for some of the teams, the "category" could be, for example, a client's name. Since I really hope our client base keeps growing, I'd rather avoid an enum that would have to be constantly updated ;) –  madd0 Nov 8 '11 at 10:35
    
im afraid no magic solution here. choose one that is less ugly for you;) –  Valentin Kuzub Nov 8 '11 at 10:53
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