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I cannot decide between the following two patterns for eg. saving a dataObject (bean in my case). The two options are:

1st

abstract class DataService {
    protected void save(Object data){
        //persist the data
    }
}
//the service for Project objects
class ProjectService extends DataService {
    public void saveProject(Project prj, Object... args /*other save options*/ ){
        // some preprocessing, checking, validation
        save(prj); //call the method in DataService
        // do postprocessing
    }
}

//calling save
projectService.saveProjec(project, /*some args*/);

2nd

abstract class DataService {
    public void save(Object data){
        if(beforeSave(data)){
            // persist the data
            afterSave(data);
        }
    }
    protected boolean beforeSave(){
        return true;
    }
    protected void afterSave(){
    }
}

//the service for Project objects
class ProjectService extends DataService {
    public initSave(Object... args /*other save options*/ ){
        // store these options in class properties
    }
    @Override
    protected bool beforeSave(Project objectAboutToBeSaved){
        // some preprocessing, checking, validation
        // use class properties set by initSave if needed
        return true;//if we want to continue with the saving procedure
    }

    @Override
    protected bool afterSave(Project savedObject){
        // do postprocessing
        // use class properties set by initSave if needed
    }
}

//calling save
projectService.initSave(/*some args*/);
projectService.save(project);

At the moment we are using the first pattern, but I began to think about moving to the second one, because:

(PROS)

  • better logical separation
  • unified method naming across multiple object types (would permit creation of generic unit tests: eg. initialize each object and its service and call save)

(CONS)

  • bit harder to set up (initSave) - might even have to include a teardown method

The idea came to me from the CakePHP MVC framework, where both the Model and Controller included such callback methods, using which I could really implement some clear business logic.

Right now I'm developing in Java - Spring + Spring Data Graph -(thus the javaish code), but this question can be a quite generic one in my opinion.

Note: the example was given for save, but the same would be for the deletion process too.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Another solution would be to use a strategy pattern and do something like the following. We're using that approach to do pre-persist validation and sometime even calculate (based on other fields) and set some fields of the data object that is to be persisted (e.g. we have a "complete" flag that is updated based on other fields whenever the persist or update one of our entities).

Your strategy:

interface SaveStrategy<T> {
  boolean beforeSave(T data);
  void afterSave(T data);
}

class SomeFancyProjectSaveStrategy implements SaveStrategy<Project> {

  public SomeFancyProjectSaveStrategy( /*parameters*/) {
  } 

  public boolean beforeSave(Project data) {
     //whatever you like
  }

  public void afterSave(Project data) {
     //whatever you like
  }
}

Your data service:

class DataService {
  public <T> void save(T data, SaveStrategy<? super T> strategy ){
    if(strategy.beforeSave(data)){
        // persist the data
        strategy.afterSave(data);
    }
  }
}

Then use them like this:

SaveStrategy<Project> saveStrategy = new SomeFancyProjectSaveStrategy(someParameters); //could reuse that
dataService.save( project, saveStrategy); //the service might even be shared for different data objects

Pros:

  • Pre- and Post-Save actions are separated from persisting
  • You can resuse strategies as long as they contain reusable data (like validation rules but no state).
  • You can use a general DataService

Cons

  • If you need special save logic you might have to maintain at least two classes: the strategy and the special data service
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+1 for the FancyStrategy "configuration object" –  Matyas Nov 8 '11 at 10:25

I would prefer the second one.

The main difference is that it tells the user of the class, how it should be used. This is a big upside (more clear) and a small downside (less flexibility). Also the second method allows for better extension of the subclasses (a subclass of ProjectService can reuse the before() method and extend the after()). One thing to keep in mind is that a subclass can actually discard one of the methods (by overriding it and not calling it in the super class). Be sure to document for each subclass if this is allowed or not.

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The first example is better for simplicity. The second example is better if you have a need to batch your data. i.e. the overhead of starting/ending an update is important.

You can still make the second example thread safe by using a thread local state.

You could have the best of both worlds with.

bool beforeSave(Project objectAboutToBeSaved);
void saveProject(Project prj, Object... args /*other save options*/ );
bool afterSave(Project savedObject);

This could be used in two modes like this.

void saveProject(Project prj, Object... args /*other save options*/ ) {
    boolean inBatch = inBatch(prj);
    if (!inBatch) beforeSave(prj);

    saveProject0(prj, args);

    if (!inBatch) afterSave(prj);
}

This allows you to mix and match and have some methods which perform a single update but when called from some methods will implicitly batch the saved data.

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I'd say neither. Both look unnecessarily complex to me.

A simple CRUD interface ought to do:

public interface GenericRepository<K extends Serializable, T> {
    Collection<T> find();
    T find(K id);
    K save(T value);
    void update(T value);
    void delete(T value);
}

All the validations and checks ought to have been done before you get to the persistence tier. It violates the single responsibility principle, in my opinion.

Transactions belong to the service tier. The persistence tier has no way to know if it's being asked to participate in a transaction. What if there are others as well?

Both your ideas are overly complex. I'd reject both.

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In my code I use repositories to save/delete data. The first example would have @Transactional annotation on saveProject(...), while the second one on save(...), and ProjectService would have to include custom business logic in after- and beforeDelete methods. In this case do you still have the above mentioned disagreement? –  Matyas Nov 8 '11 at 10:45
    
Yes, I do. Your respositories should not know about transactions, in my opinion. Services know about units of work. –  duffymo Nov 8 '11 at 19:00
    
Agree, but the classes described in the post are in the service layer and they use repositories (inside of save/delete) - thus the name ProjectService (which handles operations related to the Project Data Object) –  Matyas Nov 9 '11 at 8:02
    
Repositories and services are separate. You said services use repositories; I agree. You sound like you're still confused. –  duffymo Nov 9 '11 at 19:49
    
My repositories don't implement anything special, just simple CRUD (they are automatically populated with methods via aspects by the Spring Data Graph framework). I have a repository for each type of databean. All I wanted is to create a somewhat uniform service layer and the question was referring to this problem. Here save (from the service) is used to create/update objects and handle related pre- and post processing tasks. Anyway, thank you for your assistance (+1) –  Matyas Nov 9 '11 at 23:21

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