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I run find and iterate through the results with [ \( -L $F \) ] to collect certain symbolic links.

I am wondering if there is an easy way to determine if the link is broken in this scenario.

Here is my code:

FILES=`find /target/ | grep -v '\.disabled$' | sort`

for F in $FILES; do
    if [ -L $F ]; then
        DO THINGS
    fi
done
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6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted
# test if file exists (test actual file, not symbolic link)
if [ ! -e "$F" ] ; then
    # code if the symlink is broken
fi
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This should print out links that are broken:

find /target/dir -type l ! -exec test -e {} \; -print

You can also chain in operations to find command, e.g. deleting the broken link:

find /target/dir -type l ! -exec test -e {} \; -exec rm {} \;
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readlink -q will fail silently if the link is bad:

for F in $FILES; do
    if [ -L $F ]; then
        if readlink -q $F >/dev/null ; then
            DO THINGS
        else
            echo "$F: bad link" >/dev/stderr
        fi
    fi
done
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this seems pretty nice as this only returns true if the file is actually a symlink. But even with adding -q, readlink outputs the name of the link on linux. If this is the case in general maybe the answer should be updated with 'readlink -q $F > dev/null'. Or am I missing something? –  zoltanctoth Nov 8 '11 at 10:55
    
No, you're right. Corrected, thanks. –  Andrew Schulman Nov 8 '11 at 11:02

To find all orphaned links:

$ find -L /target -type l | while read -r file; do echo $file is orphaned; done

To find all files that are not orphaned links:

$ find -L /target ! -type l
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1  
But this follows non-broken symlinks to directories, which we may not want. –  rafak Dec 15 '12 at 13:01

this will work if the symlink was pointing to a file or a directory, but now is broken

if [[ -L "$strFile" ]] && [[ ! -a "$strFile" ]];then 
  echo "'$strFile' is a broken symlink"; 
fi
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This finds all files of type "link", which also resolves to a type "link". ie. a broken symlink

find /target -type l -xtype l
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