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The following code:

let CreateFunc=
    let counter = ref 0
    fun () -> counter := !counter + 1; !counter

let f1 = CreateFunc
let f2 = CreateFunc

printfn "%d" (f1())
printfn "%d" (f1())
printfn "%d" (f2())
printfn "%d" (f2())

Outputs:

1
2
3
4

So, basically, what we see here is f1 and f2 being the same function - as they're obviously sharing the same instance of 'counter'.

The expected output is:

1
2
1
2

QUESTION: Shouldn't f1 and f2 be two separate instances? After all they are created by the two different calls to 'CreateFunc'???

Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted
let CreateFunc() =
    let counter = ref 0
    fun () -> counter := !counter + 1; !counter

let f1 = CreateFunc()
let f2 = CreateFunc()

printfn "%d" (f1())
printfn "%d" (f1())
printfn "%d" (f2())
printfn "%d" (f2())

Output is

1
2
1
2

Explanation:

In your original solution, CreateFunc was a function, but always the same function (CreateFunc, f1 and f2 were all synonyms, all pointing to the same function). In my solution CreateFunc is a function which returns a new function whenever it is called, thus each function has its own state (i.e. counter).

In short: the original CreateFunc was a value, always the same value.

share|improve this answer
    
What is this := ? –  swapneel Nov 8 '11 at 12:59
    
@swapneel - := is the way you assign a value to a reference cell (created with ref 0 in this case). This code uses !counter to read the value out of the reference cell. –  Joel Mueller Nov 8 '11 at 18:02
1  
To elaborate @JoelMueller's answer: since regular let-bindings are immutable, when you do want to use mutable bindings (and let mutable has its disadvantages), you use ref types, which are a bit similar to C/C++ pointers (only a bit). To get their value you can use the ! prefix operator (like in the code !counter) and to assign you can use the binary operator := (line in the code counter := !counter + 1). Note: since counter := !counter + 1 is common, there is an incr function (used incr counter) which increments the int ref by one. –  Ramon Snir Nov 8 '11 at 18:44
2  
To elaborate to @Ramon Snir's answer, ordinary mutables are not allowed in closures, so ref cells must be used here. –  Robert Jeppesen Nov 9 '11 at 8:15

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