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Suppose I have:

class B;
class A{
    private:
        B *b;
    public:
        bar(){ b->foo()};
        foo();
}

class B{
    private:
        A *a;
    public:
        bar(){ a->foo();}
        foo();
}

When compiled this file gives an

error "invalid use of incomplete type struct B",

even after I have forward declared the class B. As far as I understand it is because when I am calling the function foo() on b, the compiler still doesn't know that such a function exists. How can I solve this problem?

share|improve this question

The forward declaration provides no implementation details. B is not known to A, other than the fact that it exists.

To solve this, separate your declaration from the implementation.

You're also missing return types for the methods.

File A.h:

class B;
class A{
    private:
        B *b;
    public:
        void bar();
        void foo();
};

File A.cpp:

#include "A.h"
#include "B.h"
void A::bar(){ 
   b->foo();
}

File B.h:

class A;
class B{
    private:
        A *a;
    public:
        void bar();
        void foo();
};

File B.cpp:

#include "B.h"
#include "A.h"
void B::bar(){ 
   a->foo();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Note that you don't have to move the function definitions to source files. If you want to keep them inline, then place them in the header file after both class definitions, with an inline qualification. – Mike Seymour Nov 8 '11 at 12:25
    
@MikeSeymour The inline qualification is only a compiler hint. Even placing functions in header files or even in the class definition doesn't force the compiler to inline them. Moreover, compilers can inline functions defined in source files. – Luchian Grigore Nov 8 '11 at 12:27
    
It may only be a "hint", but just about any compiler will inline a very small function like this if it can, as doing so will improve both speed and code size. Some compilers can inline functions between translation units, but many can't - if you care about performance and portability, then it's a good idea to define simple functions inline in header files when you can. – Mike Seymour Nov 8 '11 at 12:33
    
Inlining does improve speed, but I don't see how it can possibly improve code size... You should leave optimizations to the compiler. – Luchian Grigore Nov 8 '11 at 12:36
    
It can improve code size by not generating the code necessary for a function call, and (if possible) not generating the inlined functions themselves. I agree that you should (usually) leave optimisations to the compiler; I do not agree with your suggestion here that you should deliberately prevent some compilers from optimising, unless there is a particular reason to prefer non-inline definitions. – Mike Seymour Nov 8 '11 at 12:40

Put the implementation in a source file instead of in the header.

share|improve this answer

The error is because you try to use a method from B in A::bar. While class B has been declared, it has not been defined.

Like the others say, you should separate the definition and the implementation, and it will work.

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