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So I have a list of options in a data object, and I want to make the equivalent of a radio button list to allow the user to select one and only one of them. Functionality similar to a databound combo box, but in radio button format.

Silly me, I thought this would be built in, but no. How do you do it?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Basically, after reviewing the google results, I started with the info from an MSDN discussion thread where Dr. WPF provided an answer, which talks about styling a ListBox to look right. However, when the listbox is disabled, the background was an annoying color that I couldn't get rid of for the life of me, until I read the MSDN example of the ListBox ControlTemplate, which shows the secret Border element that was kicking my background butt.

So, the final answer here was this style:

    <Style x:Key="RadioButtonList" TargetType="{x:Type ListBox}">
    <!-- ControlTemplate taken from MSDN http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms754242.aspx -->
    <Setter Property="SnapsToDevicePixels" Value="true"/>
    <Setter Property="OverridesDefaultStyle" Value="true"/>
    <Setter Property="ScrollViewer.HorizontalScrollBarVisibility" Value="Auto"/>
    <Setter Property="ScrollViewer.VerticalScrollBarVisibility" Value="Auto"/>
    <Setter Property="ScrollViewer.CanContentScroll" Value="true"/>
    <Setter Property="MinWidth" Value="120"/>
    <Setter Property="MinHeight" Value="95"/>
    <Setter Property="Template">
        <Setter.Value>
            <ControlTemplate TargetType="ListBox">
                <Border 
      Name="Border" 
      Background="Transparent"
      BorderBrush="Transparent"
      BorderThickness="0"
      CornerRadius="2">
                    <ScrollViewer 
        Margin="0"
        Focusable="false">
                        <StackPanel Margin="2" IsItemsHost="True" />
                    </ScrollViewer>
                </Border>
                <ControlTemplate.Triggers>
                    <Trigger Property="IsEnabled" Value="false">
                        <Setter TargetName="Border" Property="Background"
                Value="Transparent" />
                        <Setter TargetName="Border" Property="BorderBrush"
                Value="Transparent" />
                    </Trigger>
                    <Trigger Property="IsGrouping" Value="true">
                        <Setter Property="ScrollViewer.CanContentScroll" Value="false"/>
                    </Trigger>
                </ControlTemplate.Triggers>
            </ControlTemplate>
        </Setter.Value>
    </Setter>
    <Setter Property="ItemContainerStyle">
        <Setter.Value>
            <Style TargetType="{x:Type ListBoxItem}" >
                <Setter Property="Margin" Value="2" />
                <Setter Property="Template">
                    <Setter.Value>
                        <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type ListBoxItem}">
                            <Border Name="theBorder" Background="Transparent">
                                <RadioButton Focusable="False"
                    IsHitTestVisible="False"
                    IsChecked="{TemplateBinding IsSelected}">
                                    <ContentPresenter />
                                </RadioButton>
                            </Border>
                        </ControlTemplate>
                    </Setter.Value>
                </Setter>
            </Style>
        </Setter.Value>
    </Setter>
</Style>

Which provides a ControlTemplate for, and styles, the ListBox and the Items. And it gets used like this:

    		<ListBox Grid.Column="1" Grid.Row="0" x:Name="TurnChargeBasedOnSelector" Background="Transparent"
			IsEnabled="{Binding Path=IsEditing}"
			Style="{StaticResource RadioButtonList}"
			ItemsSource="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type local:MainForm}}, Path=DataContext.RampTurnsBasedOnList}"
			DisplayMemberPath="Description" SelectedValuePath="RampTurnsBasedOnID"
			SelectedValue="{Binding Path=RampTurnsBasedOnID, NotifyOnValidationError=True, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged, ValidatesOnDataErrors=True, ValidatesOnExceptions=True}"

                                     />

The more I spend time with WPF, the more I think it makes the trivial insanely difficult and the insanely difficult trivial. Enjoy. -Scott

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4  
+1 for the comment on WPF making trivial problems difficult and vice versa. I think that we are experiencing some serious early adopter problems here. This post from another discussion has a very nice solution for binding to Enums. It plays nicely with this solution: <stackoverflow.com/questions/58743/…; –  Paul Prewett Jul 7 '09 at 18:47
    
I frequently find it easier to use an ItemsControl than ListBox when I need a repeated template. –  xr280xr Mar 21 '13 at 18:34

Bind the listbox to the ItemsSource of a ListBox with a list of objects that have a property Name (this can change)

<ListBox Name="RadioButtonList">
   <ListBox.ItemTemplate >
        <DataTemplate >
             <RadioButton GroupName="radioList" Tag="{Binding}" Content="{Binding Name}"/>
         </DataTemplate>
                                                    </ListBox.ItemTemplate>
                                                </ListBox>

important GroupName="radioList"

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I've done this through a ValueConverter that converts an enum to a bool. By passing the enum value that your radio button represents as the ConverterParameter, the converter returns whether this radio button should be checked or not.

<Window.Resources>
    <Converters:EnumConverter x:Key="EnumConverter" />
</Window.Resources>

<RadioButton IsChecked="{Binding Path=MyEnum, Mode=TwoWay, 
                                 Converter={StaticResource EnumConverter}, 
                                 ConverterParameter=Enum1}"}
             Content="Enum 1" />
<RadioButton IsChecked="{Binding Path=MyEnum, Mode=TwoWay, 
                                 Converter={StaticResource EnumConverter}, 
                                 ConverterParameter=Enum2}"}
             Content="Enum 2" />

EnumConverter is defined as follows:

public class EnumConverter : IValueConverter
    {
        public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
        {
            if (targetType.IsAssignableFrom(typeof(Boolean)) && targetType.IsAssignableFrom(typeof(String)))
                throw new ArgumentException("EnumConverter can only convert to boolean or string.");
            if (targetType == typeof(String))
                return value.ToString();

            return String.Compare(value.ToString(), (String)parameter, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) == 0;
        }

        public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
        {
            if (targetType.IsAssignableFrom(typeof(Boolean)) && targetType.IsAssignableFrom(typeof(String)))
                throw new ArgumentException("EnumConverter can only convert back value from a string or a boolean.");
            if (!targetType.IsEnum)
                throw new ArgumentException("EnumConverter can only convert value to an Enum Type.");

            if (value.GetType() == typeof(String))
            {
                return Enum.Parse(targetType, (String)value, true);
            }

            //We have a boolean, as for binding to a checkbox. we use parameter
            if ((Boolean)value)
                return Enum.Parse(targetType, (String)parameter, true);

            return null;
        }
    }

Note that I don't databind to the list of enums to generate the radio buttons, I've done them by hand. If you wanted to fill the list of radio buttons through a binding, I think you'll need to change the IsChecked binding to a MultiBinding which binds to both the current value and the radio's enum value, because you cannot use a binding on ConverterParameter.

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The last sentence is painfully true: social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/wpf/thread/… –  jan Aug 12 '11 at 8:49

I cheated:

My solution was to bind the list box programaticly since that is all that seemed to work for me:

            if (mUdData.Telephony.PhoneLst != null)
            {
                lbPhone.ItemsSource = mUdData.Telephony.PhoneLst;
                lbPhone.SelectedValuePath = "ID";
                lbPhone.SelectedValue = mUdData.Telephony.PrimaryFaxID;
            }

The XAML looks like this:

                        <ListBox.ItemTemplate >

                        <DataTemplate >
                            <Grid>
                                <Grid.RowDefinitions>
                                    <RowDefinition></RowDefinition>
                                </Grid.RowDefinitions>
                                <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
                                    <ColumnDefinition Width="Auto"></ColumnDefinition>
                                    <ColumnDefinition Width="Auto"></ColumnDefinition>
                                </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>

                                <RadioButton 
                                    IsChecked="{Binding Path=PrimaryPhoneID}" 
                                    GroupName="Phone" 
                                    x:Name="rbPhone"
                                    Content="{Binding Path=PrimaryPhoneID}"
                                    Checked="rbPhone_Checked"/>

                                <CheckBox Grid.Column="2" IsEnabled="False" IsChecked="{Binding Path=Active}" Content="{Binding Path=Number}" ></CheckBox>

                            </Grid>
                        </DataTemplate>
                    </ListBox.ItemTemplate>

And in my event to read the value of the radio button as it is selected looks like this:

    private void rbPhone_Checked(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        DataRowView dvFromControl = null;
        dvFromControl = (DataRowView)((RadioButton)sender).DataContext;

        BindData.Telephony.PrimaryPhoneID = (int)dvFromControl["ID"];

    }

Hope that helps someone.

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I took my inspiration from Jon Benson's blog entry, but modified his solution to use enumerations that have a description attribute. So the key parts of the solution became:

Enumerator with descriptions

public enum AgeRange {
  [Description("0 - 18 years")]
  Youth,
  [Description("18 - 65 years")]
  Adult,
  [Description("65+ years")]
  Senior,
}

Code for reading descriptions and returning key/value pairs for binding.

public static class EnumHelper
{
    public static string ToDescriptionString(this Enum val)
    {
        var attribute =
            (DescriptionAttribute)
            val.GetType().GetField(val.ToString()).GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false).
                SingleOrDefault();
        return attribute == default(DescriptionAttribute) ? val.ToString() : attribute.Description;
    }

    public static List<KeyValuePair<string,string>> GetEnumValueDescriptionPairs(Type enumType)
    {
        return Enum.GetValues(enumType)
            .Cast<Enum>()
            .Select(e => new KeyValuePair<string, string>(e.ToString(), e.ToDescriptionString()))
            .ToList();
    }
}

Your Object Data Provider in XAML

<ObjectDataProvider
    ObjectType="{x:Type local:EnumHelper}"
    MethodName="GetEnumValueDescriptionPairs"
    x:Key="AgeRanges">
    <ObjectDataProvider.MethodParameters>
        <x:Type TypeName="local:AgeRange" />
    </ObjectDataProvider.MethodParameters>
</ObjectDataProvider>

Your ListBox in XAML

<ListBox 
    ItemsSource="{Binding Source={StaticResource AgeRanges}}"
    SelectedValue="{Binding SelectedAgeRange}"
    SelectedValuePath="Key">
    <ListBox.ItemTemplate>
        <DataTemplate>
            <RadioButton 
                IsChecked="{Binding IsSelected, RelativeSource={RelativeSource Mode=FindAncestor, AncestorType={x:Type ListBoxItem}}}"
                Content="{Binding Value}" />
        </DataTemplate>
    </ListBox.ItemTemplate>
</ListBox>

The property (e.g. in your view model) that you are binding to

public class YourViewModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
  private AgeRange _selectedAgeRange;
  public AgeRange SelectedAgeRange
  {
    get { return _selectedAgeRange; }
    set 
    {
      if (value != _selectedAgeRange)
      {
        _selectedAgeRange = value;
        OnPropertyChanged("SelectedAgeRange");
      }
    }
  }
}
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Sorry, I'd like to put this response to Scott O's post as a comment on his post, but I do not yet have the reputation to do that. I really liked his answer as it was a style-only solution and hence didn't require any added code-behind or creating a custom-control, etc.

However, I did have one issue when I then went to try using controls inside the ListBoxItems. When I use this style I am unable to focus any of the contained controls due to this line:

<RadioButton Focusable="False" IsHitTestVisible="False" IsChecked="{TemplateBinding IsSelected}">

The radio button needs to turn off Focusable and IsHitTestVisible for the IsChecked binding to work correctly. To get around this, I changed the IsChecked from a TemplateBinding to a regular binding, which allowed me to make it a two-way binding. Removing the offending settings gave me this line:

<RadioButton IsChecked="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource TemplatedParent}, Path=IsSelected, Mode=TwoWay}">

Which now allows me to focus any controls contained in ListBoxItems as expected.

Hope this helps.

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+1 since I also experienced that problem and came to the same solution, encouraged by your answer, –  Andreas H. Aug 15 '13 at 8:29

Super Simple, MVVM friendly, leveraging DataTemplates for types. XAML:

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfApplication1"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">

<Window.Resources>
    <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type local:Option}">
        <RadioButton Focusable="False"
                IsHitTestVisible="False"
                Content="{Binding Display}"
                IsChecked="{Binding IsSelected, RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType=ListBoxItem}}">
        </RadioButton>
    </DataTemplate>
</Window.Resources>

<Grid>
    <ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding Options}" SelectedItem="{Binding SelectedOption}"/>
</Grid>

View Model, etc:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        this.DataContext = new Vm();
    }
}

public class Vm
{
    public Option[] Options { get { return new Option[] { 
        new Option() { Display = "A" }, 
        new Option() { Display = "B" }, 
        new Option() { Display = "C" } }; } }
    public Option SelectedOption { get; set; }
}

public class Option
{
    public string Display { get; set; }
}

If you wrap your option into a specific type (or likely it is already). You can just set a DataTemplate for that type, WPF will automatically use it. (Define DataTemplate in ListBox resources to limit the scope of where the DataTemplate will be applied).

Also use group name in the DataTemplate to set the group if you want.

This is much simpler than changing the control template, however it does mean that you get a blue line on selected items. (Again, nothing a bit of styling can't fix).

WPF is simple when you know how.

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GroupName can be set like this: <RadioButton GroupName="{Binding Name, RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType=ListBox}}" ...... And set the ListBox name: <StackPanel> <ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding Options}" SelectedItem="{Binding SelectedOption}" Name="Name1"/> <ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding Options}" SelectedItem="{Binding SelectedOption}" Name="Name2"/> </StackPanel> –  Roman Stefanidi Apr 10 '13 at 6:50

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