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I want to add cookies to all JAX-RS responses produced in the application. How can I do this? I don't use Response class.

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3 Answers 3

you can use interceptors: http://cxf.apache.org/docs/jax-rs.html#JAX-RS-Filters%2CInterceptorsandInvokers

probably you will be needed to write your own (extend it from some existing default output interceptor) if there is no ready-for-use solution

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This feature is available only in Apache CXF an is not JAX-RS compatible, unfortunately. –  yegor256 Nov 8 '11 at 14:00

You can use a HTTPFilter that adds the cookie value to your requests. If not that then you can get hold of the context in your methods and manually handle the cookie handling

public Response updateCustomer(@Context HttpHeaders h, Customer c) {
   ...
}
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Jersey has a concept of container filters you can use for this. In this particular case you can implement a ContainerResponseFilter that adds the cookie to the header. See the documentation on how to create and register container filters here: http://jersey.java.net/nonav/apidocs/latest/jersey/com/sun/jersey/api/container/filter/package-summary.html

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This mechanism is not JAX-RS compliant, it's just a Jersey-specific trick, right? –  yegor256 Apr 26 '12 at 9:14
    
Right. There is no notion of filters in JAX-RS 1.1. This is what we are adding in JAX-RS 2.0. If you want to be impl-independent, you can do this using a servlet filter that you map to the same URI pattern as your JAX-RS app. But that does not give you access to the internal JAX-RS objects, such as UriInfo or similar - i.e. you'll have to figure out how to pass info from your JAX-RS app to the filter if you need that. –  Martin Matula Apr 27 '12 at 7:34

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