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I've read about WebSockets but they don't seem to be pure "sockets", because there is an application layer protocol over them. "ws:"

Is there any way of doing a pure socket connection from a web browser, to enliven webpages?

Here are my random stabs in the dark

  • Applets sockets provided by Java (need java installed)
  • Flash sockets provided by Flash (need flash installed)

But about HTML5, Why are they called WebSockets if they aren't Sockets?

Is the websocket protocol so simple to implement that it is "almost"-sockets?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I've read about WebSockets but they don't seem to be pure "sockets", because there is an application layer protocol over them.

[Is the] websocket protocol so simple to implement that [it is] "almost"-sockets?

Allowing regular socket connections directly from the browser is never going to happen because it opens up a huge risk. WebSockets is about as close to raw sockets from the browser as you are going to get. The initial WebSockets handshake is similar to an HTTP handshake (allowing web servers to proxy/bridge it) and adds CORS type security. In addition, WebSockets is a message based transport (rather than streaming as raw TCP) and this is done using a two byte header on each message frame.

Even flash is not able to quite make raw TCP connections. Flash sockets also add CORS security, but instead of an in-band handshake, flash socket connections make a connection to port 843 on the target server to request a security policy file.

Is there any way of doing a pure socket connection from a web browser, to enliven webpages?

Yes, you can use my websockify bridge/proxy which allows a WebSockets enabled browser to connect directly to a TCP socket via websockify.

But about HTML5, Why are they called WebSockets if they aren't Sockets?

WebSockets are a transport built on TCP sockets. After the handshake there is very minimal overhead (typically just a two byte header).

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Nice answer +1, and thanks for the typo. Narrowing my search: It will be enough for me if I can connect with a Server at the client side I mean a server installed at client machine, localhost from the point of view of the browser, perhaps there security issues (should) be simpler, any advice on this? thanks –  Hernán Eche Nov 8 '11 at 15:52
    
Connecting to localhost doesn't really change the security situation. Imagine a malicious web page (or malicious advertisement on a friendly web page) that could connect to all your local ports. Basically it bypasses all firewall protection. You could still run websockify locally for any ports you wish to proxy. –  kanaka Nov 8 '11 at 19:12
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There is w3c a draft for a raw socket api The security and privacy considerations is weak and singular. That's all I have to say. –  user2350838 Jul 8 '13 at 17:46
    
@user2350838, the Raw Sockets specification is part of the sysapps WG (w3.org/2012/09/sysapps-wg-charter.html). The sysapps WG charter is to standardize the APIs that are available to trusted/user installed web applications (i.e. installed web apps). It's not something that will be available to standard web site/web applications. For example, Chrome packaged aps, Firefox OS apps, PhoneGap apps, etc have access to additional APIs. The sysapps group is trying to create a standard for those APIs. –  kanaka Jul 8 '13 at 18:52

I can't improve on Kanaka's answers to your secondary questions, and I know this question is a year old. But for the main question, Is there any way of doing a pure socket connection from a web browser, to enliven webpages? There is a project called the Java / JavaScript Socket Bridge that might be what you (or anyone coming across this page from a Google search) are looking for. The advantage of this method over what others have mentioned is that it does not require either a client-side or a server-side service to be run. So, for instance, if you wanted to implement an IRC client purely in JavaScript but your web host does not allow you sufficient rights to proxy the connection, this Java applet would be the way to go. The only concern is making sure the client has Java installed and allowed.

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You can just send data between a client and a server with WebSockets. Simply speaking, the only difference that WebSockets introduces is that the client:

  • adds some header bytes, like the type of data and the length
  • adds masks and encodes the data using them

The server also has to add header bytes, but does not need to encode the data.

If you implement the protocol correctly (server side, that is, since the browser already has an implementation), you can use it with ease to send text and binary data. (Although browser support is narrow, especially for the latter.)

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Would be great to know, how those header bytes look like, any reference? thanks –  Hernán Eche Nov 8 '11 at 14:14
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@void: There is the specification at tools.ietf.org/html/…. Previously I posted some pseudocode about decoding data from client to server at stackoverflow.com/q/7045885 –  pimvdb Nov 8 '11 at 14:16

If you are asking for some data to be pushed from server it is widely termed as COMET or Reverse Ajax.

Web sockets is still not very popular as there are inherent firewall issues and minimal support yet from popular browsers.

You can take a look at http://www.ape-project.org/ as this is one of the most popular implementations (but native to unix/linux only for now. For windows they suggest using a virtual box or vmware based implementation)

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