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I have a studentadministration application. Now I have to implement a new part of this application that gives advise (in the style of a text) depending on the grades of the student. So we have 1 "algorithm" and 4(for the moment) different texts(variations) as output).

What is the best pattern in this case? I personally think about using the bridge pattern so that I can put the algorithm in the abstraction class and put the different texts as concrete implementors.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you're over engineering this.

This is a pretty simple search algorithm problem. Your domain consists of Students (who want advice), Pieces of Advice (who contain knowledge), and a Provider of some kind, which will contain a search algorithm to help the student find advice.

Using the following, I can simply change the search algorithm at any time to suit my needs. I can either create an entirely new search, or modify the one I already have. In addition, I could create a search that works off of a database instead of a list of advice. I can add new criteria by updating my StudentAdvice model and searching for that advice within the provider (these are two distinct changes, so it does not violate the Open/Closed principle).

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var advices = new[]
        {
            new StudentAdvice{ Grade = 60, Advice = "Talk to your professor." },
            new StudentAdvice{ Grade = 70, Advice = "Spend more time studing." },
            new StudentAdvice{ Grade = 80, Advice = "Spend even more time studing." },
            new StudentAdvice{ Grade = 90, Advice = "You're doing great, almost there!" },
            new StudentAdvice{ Grade = 100, Advice = "Perfect!" },
        };

        IStudentAdviceProvider adviceProvider = new GradeBasedAdviceProvider(advices);

        var student = new Student { Name = "Jim", Grade = 80 };

        foreach(var advice in adviceProvider.GetAdvice(student))
        {
            Console.WriteLine(advice.Advice);
        }
    }
}

public interface IStudentAdviceProvider
{
    IEnumerable<StudentAdvice> GetAdvice(Student student);
}

public class GradeBasedAdviceProvider : IStudentAdviceProvider
{
    private readonly IEnumerable<StudentAdvice> advices;

    public GradeBasedAdviceProvider(IEnumerable<StudentAdvice> advices)
    {
        this.advices = advices;
    }

    public IEnumerable<StudentAdvice> GetAdvice(Student student)
    {
        // Advice Selection Algorithm
        return advices.Where(advice => student.Grade <= advice.Grade).Take(1).ToList();
    }
}

public class Student
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Grade { get; set; }
}

public class StudentAdvice
{
    public int Grade { get; set; }
    public string Advice { get; set; }
}

At it's core, this could be used as a strategy pattern. However, I started with the domain, and the pattern emerged itself. Picking patterns first codes you into corners.

Learning design patterns gives us a bunch of tools to use. Learning SOLID design principles allows us to realize when those tools should be used. The following site has some great resources related to OOD.

http://butunclebob.com/ArticleS.UncleBob.PrinciplesOfOod

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+1 for the corners warning –  Wivani Nov 8 '11 at 15:24
    
I'm still in the learning phase of using patterns. Thanks for the warning! :) –  izar Nov 9 '11 at 10:36
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Seems to me that template method pattern would be the best choice. You have an algorithm in which one step (output) can vary. So I'll do something like this (PHP):

abstract class MyAlgo
{
    function executeAlgo()   
    {
        $this->step1();
        $this->step2();
        $this->output();
    }

    function step1()
    {
       ...
    }

    function step2()
    {
        ...
    }

    abstract function output();
}

class Variation1 extends MyAlgo
{
    function output()
    {
        ...
    }
}

class Variation2 extends MyAlgo
{
    function output()
    {
        ...
    }
}
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Will take a look at the Template Method. Thanks :) –  izar Nov 8 '11 at 14:34
1  
This breaks SRP. What would I need to change if I wanted to run a report of a student advice instead of display it to the student? What portion would I change if I needed to search by some other criteria? What portion would I change if I started storing advice in a database? –  Christopher Harris Nov 8 '11 at 15:04
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