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This is the code I wrote for inputting random numbers initially and then sorting them with the insertion sort method.

        #include<iostream>

        #include <cstdlib>

        #include <ctime>

        using namespace std;

        int main(void)
        {

           int array[10];

           srand (time(0));

           for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(array)/sizeof(array[0]); i++ )// inputting values into array[10]
           {
              array[i] = 1 + (rand()%100); //any random number between 1 - 100
           }
           cout <<" Before sorting " << " ---" <<endl;
           for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(array)/sizeof(array[0]); i++ )// printing the values
           {
               cout  <<  array[i]<< endl;
           }


           int key ;
           int t;//for future purpose
           int compcount = 0;//to keep track of comparisons
           for (int j = 1; j<sizeof(array)/sizeof(array[0]);j++)
           {
               key = array[j];//assign to second element initially
               t = j-1;//assign to first element initially
               while (j > 0 && array[t]>key)
               {
                   array[t+1] = array[t];//moving array if bigger than next element
                   t = t-1;
                   compcount++;
               }
               array[t+1] = key;
           }
           cout << " After sorting" << " --- " <<endl;

           for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(array)/sizeof(array[0]); i++ )
           {
               cout  <<  array[i]<< endl;
           }
           cout << "comparison count is " << compcount << endl;
           system ("pause");

           return 0;

        }

I'll be honest , I have a project and it asks to run the algorithm for the best , worst and random input and calculate the number of key comparisons (Which I believe is "compcount" in this code)

Now random input would make sense for this. When I did another code with "an already sorted "array of numbers (the best case scenario) ,the number of key comparisons was 0. Can someone shed some light onto whether the worst case scenario is just the complete opposite of that? If that were the case I tried doing that but I only got 32 comparisons with the size of the array being 32.

Sorry for the long question . Worst case input should have (n^2-n)/2 number of comparisons right? And the best case should have n-1 because only the first element would run through the entire list and confirm it being sorted.How do I get this in code?

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Who gave you that code? Have you tested it? The sorting part is definitely not correct. –  Björn Pollex Nov 8 '11 at 14:25
    
It is.I wrote this code and ran it as well.It works just fine too. –  Mahi Vattekat Nov 8 '11 at 14:27
1  
No, it is not. See here. –  Björn Pollex Nov 8 '11 at 14:29
    
You should consider naming your variables better. What is the value of j > 0 in your inner while loop? I don't see it ever getting messed with outside your for loop, which means it should always be true. –  Mranz Nov 8 '11 at 14:31
2  
Also, you are making a comparison as part of the while conditional, which means you are only counting a successful comparison, which is why your best case result is wrong. compcount++ should also be right above the while loop. –  Mranz Nov 8 '11 at 14:35
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's one error in your program

           while (j > 0 && array[t]>key)

should be

           while (t >= 0 && array[t]>key)

Other than that, it works for me with the inverse sorted input. It is indeed the worst case and the result clearly shows it.

You've got the result off by n-1, but that's a minor problem. For a solution, see @Mranz's answer.

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The worst case input should have (n^2-n)/2 times comparisons right? –  Mahi Vattekat Nov 8 '11 at 14:53
1  
@MahiVattekat: We don't want t to underflow the array. j>0 doesn't make sense, since j is unchanged during the loop. –  jpalecek Nov 8 '11 at 14:53
    
Because t actually decrements and therefore you run the risk of decrementing it below 0. –  Mranz Nov 8 '11 at 14:53
    
Yes sorry I just realised that checking for j is unneccessary when we are indeed decrementing t –  Mahi Vattekat Nov 8 '11 at 14:56
    
Thank you very much!!!It indeed IS (n^2-n)/2 times for the worst case input!!thank you thank you –  Mahi Vattekat Nov 8 '11 at 15:00
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You are making a comparison as part of the while conditional, which means you are only counting a successful comparison, which is why your best case result is wrong. compcount++ should also be right above the while loop.

Edit:

compCount++;
while (t >= 0 && array[t] > key)
{
    array[t+1] = array[t];//moving array if bigger than next element
    t = t-1;

    if (t >= 0) // This is a hack to ensure that 't >= 0' will pass
       compCount++; // and another comparison will happen
}
share|improve this answer
    
Let me see if this is true –  Mahi Vattekat Nov 8 '11 at 14:44
    
When I use compcount++ inside the while loop for the worst case scenario it comes true according to the theoretical value. But when I do compcount ++ in the while loop for the best case scenario , it's 0. Should I be putting compcount++ out of the while loop while doing the best case input? –  Mahi Vattekat Nov 8 '11 at 16:31
    
It needs to be in both places. Right outside the while loop to catch the first comparison, and inside the while loop to catch each subsequent comparison. It may seem like an odd process flow, because it is, but it works. –  Mranz Nov 8 '11 at 16:33
    
If thats the case the worst case scenario comes with 527 times opposing 496 .496 is right when I put in the (n^2-n)/2 formula for 32.But it isnt 527 theoretically.So that cant be true for the worst case –  Mahi Vattekat Nov 8 '11 at 16:35
    
oops no i was right .It is 527 again.So it cant be in both places –  Mahi Vattekat Nov 8 '11 at 16:39
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