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Can it support a small business? Do people recommend MySql + Php set up or a Java server to support a business with say 2000 editors accessing the data at the same time?

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MySQL and PHP are very scalable if that is what you're asking. But whether a server can support 2000 concurrent users or not largely depends on the hardware. Additionally, a poorly written application in any language can significantly increase the load on the server.

Sites/companies that use MySQL:

  • Baidu
  • Wikipedia
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Feedburner
  • Flickr
  • Freshmeat.net
  • Friendster
  • LinkedIn
  • LiveJournal
  • Photobucket
  • Slashdot
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter
  • YouTube
  • YoutSendIt
  • Hot or Not
  • 37 Signals

Sites that use PHP:

  • Facebook
  • Photobucket
  • Wikipedia
  • Yahoo!
  • Digg
  • Friendster
  • SourceForge
  • Flickr
  • Imageshack
  • Wordpress.org

Edit:
There are much better (more important) criteria for picking a development platform than the maximum number of connections it can support. Unless you have severe hardware restrictions and absolutely need to squeeze every ounce of performance out of your server, it doesn't really make sense to choose one over the other for this reason. All of the major RDBMS and scripting languages have reasonable performance and scale quite well. You'll find all of them being used in organizations, and on applications, of all sizes.

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It could be done as easily as with any other commonly implemented setup. Are you intending to build your own from scratch, or have you (hopefully) identified an existing solution to start with?

As an example, the popular phpBB forum application has supported similar heavy usage for several years, even before the benefit of increasing Moore's Law scalability. Several CMS packages would be strong references as well.

I'm concerned that, if you're asking such a basic question, you may have a fair stretch ahead. For instance, a generic design using these tools would require nothing approaching 2000 "simultaneous connections" to either the server or the database to support 2000 PHP-driven web page users all logged on at once.

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