Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If we hit SomeController.SomeAction() but the file SomeAction.cshtml isn't found we get a System.InvalidOperationException and the output error message...

The view 'SomeAction' or its master was not found or no view engine supports the searched locations. The following locations were searched: ...etc

However, even with this file missing the test below will pass as a ViewResult is still being returned.

What is the best way to check the action's call to View() has not thrown an exception and quietly returned this in ViewResult content?


public class SomeController: Controller
{
    public ActionResult SomeAction()
    {
        var viewModel = new SomeModel();
        return View(viewModel);
    }
}

[Test]
public void TestIndex(Type clientType)
{
    var controller = new SomeController();
    var result = (ViewResult)controller.SomeAction();

    Assert.That(result, Is.TypeOf<ViewResult>());
}

NOTE: This is a trivial example of a bigger problem, there is good reason to perform this kind of test at this point but this is not the forum for that discussion.

share|improve this question
    
Maybe if you remove the cast to ViewResult? –  Dave Nov 8 '11 at 16:19
    
Some additional context: Some view engine customisations mean that the above code will be searching the Views tree dynamically based on code not show and there are 100s of possible search tree permutations. –  gingerbreadboy Nov 8 '11 at 16:40

2 Answers 2

Typically, making sure that view code executes without error is the responsibility of UI tests, not unit tests. You could try to use the FindView method, though. You'd just have to mock up a ControllerContext to mimic the Http request you're pretending to perform.

You may also be interested in the latest version of Resharper, which is pretty good at alerting you when your controller code refers to a View that doesn't exist.

share|improve this answer
    
Some view engine customisations mean that the above code will be searching the Views tree dynamically based on code not show and there are 100s of possible search tree permutations. Resharper can't help us here unfortunately, awesome as it is :) –  gingerbreadboy Nov 8 '11 at 16:41
    
@runrunraygun: Will that prevent the FindView method from working? –  StriplingWarrior Nov 8 '11 at 16:57
    
I'm going to try mocking up a ControllerContext and see how that goes. Will report back when it's done. –  gingerbreadboy Nov 9 '11 at 9:22

In my opinion you should not be trying to assert if a view exists in the unit test for a controller action. What you need to test is the controller action behavior which in this case is pretty simple, as it should be. So you would have tests for:

  • Action returns the default view;
  • Action passes the correct model for the view.

Also, as a sidenote, if you have a test that casts the result of the action to ViewResult you might as well be explicit about it and change the return type of the action. This change makes your code clearer and also eliminates the need for the sample test you presented which has a bug, since if the cast fails the assert code is not reached and if the cast succeeds the assert is redundant.

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate you taking time to provide some input, but there is good reason to be performing this kind of test at this point. Some view engine customisations mean that the above code will be searching the Views tree dynamically based on code not show and there are 100s of possible search tree permutations. –  gingerbreadboy Nov 8 '11 at 16:39
2  
Then you need to unit test the view engine customizations separately from the controller unit tests and probably also do integration tests to make sure that any possible permutation generated has a corresponding view defined. –  João Angelo Nov 8 '11 at 16:47
    
The architecture is the architecture, the test requirement comes from on high. I just work here ;) –  gingerbreadboy Nov 8 '11 at 16:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.