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I'd like to have real-time access to both interpreter input and error and standard output. Preferably this information would be written to a file, so that I can poll the file for changes after every interpreter command has been entered. For example, given an interpreter session:

>>> 5 * 7
35
>>> print("Hello, world!")
Hello, world!
>>> "Hello, world!"
'Hello, world!'

I'd like to see the following in a log file:

> 5 * 7
35
> print("Hello, world!")
Hello, world!
> "Hello, world!"
'Hello, world!'

The formatting is not important; what is important is that I can search the file for key words to trigger interactive events during the session.

What I have learned so far trying to accomplish this:

Python's code module allows me to create an InteractiveConsole object, the raw_input method of which I can redefine to log to a file, like so:

import code
class LoggedConsole(code.InteractiveConsole):
  def __init__(self, locals):
    super(LoggedConsole, self).__init__(locals)
    self.file = open('consolelog.dat', 'a')

  def __del__(self):
    self.file.close()

  def raw_input(self, prompt=""):
    data = input(prompt)
    self.file.write(data+'\n')
    return data

Furthermore, InteractiveConsole uses a built-in write method to log errors, which I can redefine to:

def write(self, data):
  sys.stderr.write(data)
  self.file.write(data+'\n')

I've also learned that the following snippet will log all stdout:

class Tee(object):
  def __init__(self):
    self.file = open('consolelog.dat', 'a')
    self.stdout = sys.stdout

  def __del__(self):
    sys.stdout = self.stdout
    self.file.close()

  def write(self, data):
    self.file.write(data)
    self.stdout.write(data)

sys.stdout = Tee()

My (broken) attempt to bring this all together was to then create a LoggedConsole object, and pass it Tee in locals.

console = LoggedConsole(locals={sys.stdout:LoggedExec()})
console.interact()

(I've not passed locals before, so perhaps I'm doing it incorrectly here, but I don't receive an error.)

Anyways, this will open a new Interactive Console, and will log (after closing) all input and errors, but not output. I've been banging my head against this for a while, and I feel like I'm close, but maybe not even.

Also, is there a way for all of this to occur during the session? Currently all logging takes place once the session is closed.

Thanks for your time, sorry for the wall of text.

edit: I'd like to be able to accomplish this in the standard Python interpreter for portability purposes.

edit2: Jaime's snippet works very well for logging everything I need. Any way, though, that I can have it do so in real time, instead of waiting for the session to close?

edit3: Figured it out :). The final, working snippet:

import code
import sys

class Tee(object):
  def __init__(self, log_fname, mode='a'):
    self.log = open(log_fname, mode)

  def __del__(self):
    # Restore sin, so, se
    sys.stdout = sys.__stdout__
    sys.stdir = sys.__stdin__
    sys.stderr = sys.__stderr__
    self.log.close()

  def write(self, data):
    self.log.write(data)
    self.log.flush()
    sys.__stdout__.write(data)
    sys.__stdout__.flush()

  def readline(self):
    s = sys.__stdin__.readline()
    sys.__stdin__.flush()
    self.log.write(s)
    self.log.flush()
    return s

sys.stdout = sys.stderr = sys.stdin = Tee('consolelog.dat', 'w')

console = code.InteractiveConsole()
console.interact()
share|improve this question
    
BTW not sure what's your use case but ipython notebook is a great addition to an interactive workflow, in case you haven't seen it yet. –  Kos Dec 14 '13 at 16:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I've only tested this in python2.7. I don't have 3 handy.

import code
import sys

class Tee(object):

  def __init__(self, log_fname, mode='a'):
    self.log = open(log_fname, mode)

  def __del__(self):
    # Restore sin, so, se
    sys.stdout = sys.__stdout__
    sys.stdir = sys.__stdin__
    sys.stderr = sys.__stderr__
    self.log.close()

  def write(self, data):
    self.log.write(data)
    sys.__stdout__.write(data)

  def readline(self):
    s = sys.__stdin__.readline()
    self.log.write(s)
    return s

# Tie the ins and outs to Tee.
sys.stdout = sys.stderr = sys.stdin = Tee('consolelog.dat', 'w')

console = code.InteractiveConsole()
console.interact()
share|improve this answer
    
This works very well. Do you have any idea how I can have it log in real time? i.e. not wait until the session has closed to write? I read somewhere that a call to sys.stdout.flush(), etc, would do it, but I'm a little unsure of how to implement. Thank you for your help so far! –  Zachary Allaun Nov 8 '11 at 18:10
    
Figured it out. You need calls to flush() both for the log file, and for the stdout/in objects. Thanks for pushing me in the right direction! –  Zachary Allaun Nov 8 '11 at 18:21
    
Glad it helped you. You should only need to flush the log. There is no reason to flush stdout/stderr. Remember, the log is the only thing actually writing to the file, so flushing it should be enough. –  jaime Nov 8 '11 at 18:39
    
I thought that as well, but (for some reason that I do not understand) the prompt in Py 3.2 does not print correctly unless I flush the std objects. I could not replicate the issue on 2.7. That's what I get for using 3, I guess :). –  Zachary Allaun Nov 8 '11 at 19:00

take a look at IPython (haven't used it myself). Here's a section in the docs that might be of particular interest: http://ipython.org/ipython-doc/dev/interactive/reference.html#session-logging-and-restoring

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I meant to mention (but forgot) that I'd prefer to use the standard Python interpreter. I may end up falling back on iPython, but I'd like to try to accomplish this without first. –  Zachary Allaun Nov 8 '11 at 16:59

See this Virtualenv article by Doug Hellmann, showing how to log an iPython session:

If you are comfortable working at the interactive prompt in this way, but want to record what you do for future reference after you close your session, you can use IPython’s logging feature to write the session to a file. To activate the log, use the control command %logstart, as illustrated in Listing 5. The output file is a Python source file, so it is easy to clean it up and turn it into a “real” module when you are done experimenting.

In [6]: %logstart
Activating auto-logging. Current session state plus future input saved.
Filename       : ipython_log.py
Mode           : rotate
Output logging : False
Raw input log  : False
Timestamping   : False
State          : active

In [7]: a = 5

In [8]: b = 6

In [9]: c = a * b

In [10]: c

Out[10]: 30

In [11]: d = [ a, b, c]

In [12]: d

Out[12]: [5, 6, 30]

In [13]: %logstop
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reference! I'd like to make this work in the standard interpreter, though. My goal here is to create something of an interactive tutorial for Python basics (and to teach myself along the way), and I'd like it to be portable for the benefit of friends who may use it. –  Zachary Allaun Nov 8 '11 at 17:02

You can simply use the unix script command, try:

script -a filename.txt
python
>> print("hi")
hi
>> exit()
exit

filename.txt will record everything you did on that session, it will look something like this:

Script started on Sat Dec 14 11:18:41 2013
python
>> print('hi')
hi
>> exit()
exit

Script done on Sat Dec 14 11:18:59 2013
share|improve this answer

You can try and use my logging tool. It's not perfect yet but it solved my problem, which seems similar to your.

https://github.com/hholst80/loginteractive

It works by using LD_PRELOAD to pipe stdin.txt (or $STDIN) to stdout. It works for python and octave, although I have not tested it that much yet.

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