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I'm considering dipping my toe in the functional programming world, and wondering if it would be better to start with Scala or Haskell. I'm coming at this primarily as a Python programmer. My only real functional programming experience with functional programming is using Scheme in an intro comp-sci class over a decade ago.

Some of the comments in Podcast #50 about Scala being more pragmatic than Haskell tend to push me towards Scala. While this is primarily a learning exercise, I'd still like to be able to put it to some practical use. However, I'm interested in hearing other people's opinions.

Edited to add: Including suggestions for other languages beyond Scala and Haskell.

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Do you know what practical use you are trying to put this new language to? –  Surya Apr 30 '09 at 16:02
    
Nothing specific in mind. –  Chris Upchurch Apr 30 '09 at 16:29
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So, what did you choose? –  Daniel C. Sobral Jan 21 '10 at 21:31
    
I'd say learn both, and put in Erlang to the mix as well. –  Jus12 Mar 3 '11 at 17:47
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20 Answers

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If your aim is to use the language you are learning in everyday tasks soon, you will probably want to choose Scala. You can use elements of functional, procedural and OO languages. You'll probably start out with a more procedural style and move from there. You will be able to interface with Java code and run your code wherever you have a JVM.

If you really want to learn functional programming, choose Haskell. It's a pure and very mature FP language. You'll be forced to think and act the FP-way. For a beginner i'd recommend starting using an interpreter first (Hugs or, as suggested by commenters, ghci), instead of compilation. That way, you can start out by defining simple computations (factorial, fibonacci numbers, sorting etc.) and interactively calling them in the interpreter, moving to more complex stuff along the way, without worrying about "real" IO too soon (it's a bit more complex in Haskell).

You can learn almost any FP concept in Haskell (algebraic types, type classes, monads), and infinite streams are supported out-of-the-box (just using the definition of lists and lazy evaluation). There's an excellent testing tool (quickchek) and you'll get a lot of support from the type system. Furthermore, there's the community report (http://haskell.org/communities/), which is basically a single place where you can find almost every project, tool and activity related to Haskell.

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I agree with everyday tasks vs really learning FP, but I think ghc is better than Hugs in almost every way. And yes, QuickCheck is amazing! –  shapr Apr 30 '09 at 14:11
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I haven't used Hugs, but GHCi is a perfectly fine interpreter -- I've been happily using it for months now. –  rtperson Apr 30 '09 at 16:38
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There are things you can do in haskell you can't do in scala, but infinite streams are not among them. scala> Stream from 1 take 100 sum res0: Int = 5050 –  extempore May 9 '09 at 4:17
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@extempore: the point is that in Haskell you don't have infinite streams--since it's lazy by default, it doesn't have to differentiate between lists and streams; the former can just be infinite. –  Tikhon Jelvis Nov 19 '11 at 4:52
    
extempore: Scala streams need extreme care for using otherwise you will leak memory massively. Avoid them is possible. –  ron Sep 21 '12 at 13:44
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You talk about

dipping my toe in the functional-programming world

These days, Haskell is the 800-pound gorilla of the functional-programming world. Other languages mentioned are often specializations or hybridizations of functional programming with other worlds.

  • Scala is a hybrid of functional and OO, with interesting mixins and module constructs.

  • F# is a hybrid of functional and .NET.

These languages have hybrid vigour and are very interesting, but they don't meet your stated goal of entering the functional-programming world. Other languages to consider are Standard ML or Scheme, but neither has total functional purity checked by the compiler.

A good toe-dipping paper is Why Functional Programming Matters by John Hughes, who is also an author of the excellent QuickCheck tool mentioned in other answers.

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Note: The article link is (currently) not working and can be accessed in stead at Kent University's website. –  check123 Aug 18 '12 at 16:28
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The benefit of Scala is that it is a object-oriented and functional language which runs on the Java Virtual Machine.

I believe that the primary audience which would benefit the most from Scala would be Java developers, as Scala is targeted at the JVM, it can interoperate well with Java libraries.

Haskell on the other hand is a purely functional language, so it would probably be a better choice for learning very strict functional language. Since you say you're a Python programmer, maybe Haskell would be a good choice.

However, if your goal is to leverage existing libraries and platforms and get the benefits of functional programming at the same time, maybe Scala would be a better choice.

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I stumbled upon a nice advocation for Scala on Artima yesterday, take a look: artima.com/scalazine/articles/programming_style.html –  Valentin Jacquemin Apr 30 '09 at 17:44
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Depends on what are your goals, I really like Scala (I think is an awesome language) and I find it very practical: you can do OO, you can do FP, or a mix of both, you can deploy in the JVM and use the thousands of libraries available for it. I feel very comfortable in Scala but I suspect that is mainly because my main experience is with Java. After I got comfortable with the basics of FP using Scala, I started to learn Haskell (but you can easily go straight to it). The main difference from the FP (learner) point of view is in Scala, things like immutability and lazy evaluation are optional, and you can always revert to the "old ways" of doing things, in Haskell you don't have any safety net and that forces you to learn (with the associated pains). If you want to learn something practical but with really advanced features, Scala would be my choice, if you want to be FORCED to learn new stuff that can blow your mind, Haskell is the choice. But, why no both? I know learning time is a scarce resource but, for me at least, is easy to switch back and forth form Scala to Haskell. Learning Scala helps me to learn Haskell and learning Haskell helps me to learn Scala :)

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I can't add much to the other answers but hopefully can offer a slightly different perspective on the "learn both" suggestions: about three months ago I started an app which needs to interface with a lot of Java libraries - I didn't want to revisit Java, I wanted static typing (which ruled out Clojure) and so I ended up going with Scala. I'm very happy with that decision - but I started to get a bit frustrated from a self-development perspective because too much of the writing and discussion about Scala falls into two camps:

  1. Very basic "Scala for busy Java developers" style tutorials which describe syntax differences from Java and only introduce very basic functional ideas ("welcome to pattern matching")
  2. Excessively academic-style discourse on typeclasses, monads etc

Neither of these are particularly helpful if you have a background in say Python and just want to learn about functional programming from first principles.

As a result, I paused on Scala and read the whole of "Learn You a Haskell for Great Good", which is a great book. And in reading that, I realised that basically all of the clever FP stuff in Scala is really similar to Haskell. So if you "get" Haskell and have an OOP background in Java/Python/whatever, then Scala will start to seem very easy.

To finish the story, I'm now completing some non-core systems programming in Haskell (sub 1000 lines) to bed in what I've learnt, and then I'm heading back to Scala to apply my new understanding of FP to my software project.

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As for the practical use argument, you might also be interested in Clojure.

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Weird ... this is a question I just posed through twitter: scala or clojure? –  Toby Hede Apr 30 '09 at 5:26
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Some answers view Haskell as a rather idealistic language not very suitable for practical programming. This is very wrong and I'm the proof of it. I have written large scale networking applications in Haskell (you can find some of the libraries I have written for that on Hackage) and was very productive, something (I believe) is not as easily possible in Scala.

Haskell is always praised as being very powerful, but interestingly its true powers for real world practical development are seldomly mentioned. Yes, Haskell is pure, safe, has a great type system, etc. These features can be summarized as correctness, which is great, because it saves you a lot of debugging time.

But its true killer features are its amazing concurrency system, its almost-automatic parallelization, its suitability for domain-specific languages and the many useful libraries on Hackage. Also using GHC Haskell produced programs are very fast. Using laziness you can get high performance with very little code for very complicated problems.

Scala is easier to enter for someone with little exposure to functional languages, but for real world development, at least in the areas of network/web applications and games, Haskell is more likely the way to go.

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I was in the same dilemma few months ago . I choose haskell because it has great book available to you for learning, which for me was really important . Also, there is a good book club group . Since your goal is to learn functional programming , why not go all the way and choose haskell instead of some confusing hybrid. Also, there is wealth of libraries in haskell too, if you want to get something practial out of it.

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Don't limit yourself to Scala or Haskell. You should probably have both Erlang and Scheme on your list of choices. I'd actually recommend you actually picking at least two of the languages and try them out (solving a few Project Euler problems with them, for example).

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I recommend Erlang. It is really simple to learn (especially functional-sequential part of language) and big joy. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Apr 30 '09 at 7:35
    
I recommend Scheme. It is really simple to learn and big joy :) –  Alexandre C. Feb 19 '12 at 14:27
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What about F#? Really pragmatic language with all the cool functional and OO features targeting the CLR

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I am thinking about learning Scala myself.

I think it has much more "real-world" potential as:

  • it runs on the JVM (and the JVM is one of the best platforms around)
  • it is getting some real uptake through orgs like Twitter
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Ok from a totally non technical/academic(==religious) point of view all I can say is:

Now that Twitter has began using Scala, it seems that Legion has become less satisfied with Ruby and Legion is learning Scala now. This means that Scala will have the mindshare of Legion which is great if you want to get webapps done.

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@*Legion* Sure downvote, but we know it's true –  Robert Gould Apr 30 '09 at 5:34
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I would recommend learning Scheme first, as it is simple to learn,, its more important to learn how to think about programming a problem using a functional approach, there http://www.scheme.com/tspl3/ is a good resource to learn scheme.

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That's why I recommended Clojure. :D –  Rayne May 7 '09 at 1:41
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Please link to version 4 now: scheme.com/tspl4 –  Alexandre C. Feb 19 '12 at 14:28
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If you want to learn functional programming, personally, I would recommend Clojure. However, Haskell will teach you the deep and dirty concepts of functional programming. Scala indeed allows you to program in the functional /style/, but it also allows you to program in the imperative style. I don't think Scala is a very good language to teach functional programming itself, but it's a great language and I would recommend it to anyone who just wants to learn a cool new language.

Clojure and Scala both run on the JVM and have access to any Java library in existence, and that is a factor you must consider if you intend to do any real, real projects with either language. Haskell has quite a few libraries as well, and continues to grow. Nonetheless, it's difficult to match Java on the library front.

Some people will say Haskell isn't a practical language, and that real-world projects are next to impossible with it. Personally, in the hands of an experienced Haskell programmer, I've seen magic worked with GHC as a wand.

Short Form: If you want to learn either language /just/ to learn functional programming, go with Clojure or Haskell, with an emphasis on Haskell. If you want to learn a language for fun, or any other reason, I recommend Scala or Clojure.

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"...in the hands of an experienced Haskell programmer, I've seen magic worked with GHC as a wand". Can you elaborate on this? –  Jon Harrop Nov 25 '10 at 21:25
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I think Haskell is a beautiful language with lots of magic. I don't have anything to elaborate on. I'm sorry you feel differently, but one isn't himself without his opinions! –  Rayne Nov 26 '10 at 3:31
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Jon wasn't stating he thinks differently from you. He simply asked you to elaborate, to provide evidence. That is the pinnacle of scientific and engineering inquiry, not a statement of disagreement of opinion. –  luis.espinal Mar 2 '11 at 13:45
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While Scala may be more immediately pragmatic, as it runs on the JVM, It's worth noting that Haskell is a major influence in languages such as Clojure and F#, as well as for some of the newer features of Python and C#. Ultimately, it depends on your goals. If your aspirations are purely academic, purely functional Haskell might be the better choice, later moving into something like F#, Scala, or Clojure as it fits your problem. If your focus is pragmatism, particularly if you're targeting the JVM, it might be better to start off with Scala or Clojure.

You may want to see what Gabriel has to say.

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Haskell may have influenced F#, but the language is almost entirely based on Objective Caml. Standard ML is worth mentioning in the same context, as O'Caml and SML are closely related. –  TrayMan Apr 30 '09 at 6:58
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Agree with Trayman. F# misattributes a lot to Haskell for political reasons (they are pushed by friends at MSR). –  Jon Harrop Nov 25 '10 at 21:23
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Haskell will probably teach you more about functional programming, because it forces you to think in a functional way. With Scala it's easier to interface with other JVM languages and libraries, so it might be better for production work, but with it it's also easier to think in a non-FP way.

Myself I'm right now starting to learn Scala, because I'm planning on using that soon in some real projects. I'll learn it by following a TDD tutorial which I created, so that I have the tests in Java but I write the production code in Scala. That should give me fast feedback on whether I have understood Scala's concepts correctly.

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Scala is supported by Java technlogy too (the creator - Martin Odersky - worked in Java compiler).

If you code in Java too, you can see Jaskell: it a scripting-functional language that I think similar to Haskell (Neal Ford speak about this very well in him book The Productive Programmer).

I never coded in Haskell but I read that it's very academic; Scala is a language built for Java world.

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Try them both ! Haskell is beautiful and Scala is neat. Oh, perhaps it's the contrary.
TryHaskell and SimplyScala while you wait for proper installation.

I would like to point that [Programming In Scala] is an fascinating read, even if you don't plain to learn Scala. Full of smart design choices and delightful points of view.

Scala is more advanced and fruitful in functional + data abstraction fusion (cf [ADT vs ADT] / view patterns).

After, just take a look at [Oz], which combines not-your-average-paradigms in a wonderful and powerful way.
[CTM] is also an essential read, whatever the language(s) you pick.

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I was in a similar position to yourself about a year ago and took the decision to learn Scheme after having my eyes opened from my Java induced slumber by Ruby. Over the course of the year I have become quite proficient in Scheme and have learned to love it partly because of it's functional bias e.g. higher order functions but also because of it's Lisp like macros.

I'm now in a position though that I understand functional programming and how to benefit from it but find that there are no jobs and few libraries for Scheme so I've evaluated potential successors. From a shortlist of Ocaml and Haskell (both of which have job opportunities and plentiful libraries), I've decided to go for Haskell because at this point in time, it looks like a more practical option than OCaml - specifically GHC supports true multithreading and parallel processing with FFI libraries whereas Ocaml doesn't. It also produces faster code and forces a pure functional approach whereas OCaml (as with Scheme) allow a mixed approach. OCaml also has disgusting syntax.

Having said that Haskell is an order of magnitude more functional than Scheme is so whilst I thought I was being clever in Scheme, it turns out that that was just the beginning of what can be done with Haskell so it could be a pretty steep learning curve as a first functional language.

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"I've decided to go for Haskell". You should learn both but you'll almost certainly end up investing in neither. As standalone language implementations with poor interoperability, they aren't good for much. –  Jon Harrop Nov 25 '10 at 21:30
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Actually, for me, Haskell has turned out to be stunningly useful. I wrote a data migration tool with it that processed 60GB of customer data, in parallel, using machine learning algorithms that allowed us to do a complex migration that was previously written off as being too hard using our traditional toolset of Teradata, Ab Initio and Java. Like most languages, there's very little you can't do with Haskell, unlike most languages it has a high likelyhood of being correct when it compiles. –  Andrew Dec 14 '10 at 14:46
    
@Jon Harrop FFI isn't considered operability? –  alternative May 26 '11 at 23:06
    
@mathepic: The FFI is the interoperability I was referring to. Look at database connectivity, for example. F# inhertits great support out-of-the-box because it is on .NET (equivalently for Scala/Clojure and the JVM) but Haskell inherits nothing and the combination of harder interop from Haskell and far fewer programmers using Haskell for database work means it is neglected and, therefore, much less useful as a tool in that context. Same for WPF vs Haskell's Qt/GTK bindings. –  Jon Harrop May 29 '11 at 10:35
    
@Andrew: "there's very little you can't do with Haskell". GUI apps and databases are obvious examples of major application domains where standalone FPLs like Haskell and OCaml really struggle. –  Jon Harrop May 29 '11 at 10:37
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I would like to chime in a bit even tho I am late for the party. I have noticed quite a few questions similar to this here and there. Pure functional side of Haskell has been portrayed negatively or positively. The Scala approach of going hybrid with OO also receives both negative and positive criticism. Having said that, let me disclose that I have chosen Scala because I think it is a pragmatic choice for me. Yet, I am going to argue on the side of learning both. I have chosen Scala and by chocie, I force myself to use functional paradigm in Scala. I use immutable over mutable and stay on the side of FP instead of imperative. As, I have decided to go with Scala, I get my hands dirty with coding in Scala while getting inspiration from Haskell for example and code. I have blogged about this. Naturally, the next process after choosing the language is learning the language. As everyone on SO knows that the best way to learn is to use the language. So, I write code in Scala and blog about it to force(again,by choice) myself to make sure that I understand what I am writing. Then, I go look up Haskell code to compare with my Scala code, thus I am learning Haskell on the side too. Let's just say that I am learning Scala as my primary fp language and I am also learning Haskell on a side.

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