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Recently I've run across some Ruby code that looks like this:

module SomeModule
  class SomeClass
    def hire_an_employee business
      # do stuff
    end
  end
end

I have never seen that def syntax before.

In the Pickaxe book, method definition is as follows:

def defname⟨(⟨,arg⟨,=val⟩⟩∗ ⟨,&blockarg⟩) ⟩
  body
end

and it states that "defname is both the name of the method and optionally the context in which it is valid." However it doesn't seem to offer any further explanation.

My question is: Can someone give a better explanation for this method definition with context and give an example of how it might be used?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The code sample defines a class within a module. The class has a single method named hire_an_employee, taking a single parameter business. There's nothing unusual about the method definition itself, unless you're referring to the missing parentheses.

Parens are optional when defining a method (and calling one, unless needed for disambiguation).

The "context" part means that defname can include a context, like self, to define a class (as opposed to instance) method.

class Foo
  def self.ohai
    p "kthxbai"
  end
end

> Foo.ohai
kthxbai
> Foo.new.ohai
NoMethodError: undefined method 'ohai' ...
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Ah, thanks! I didn't realize the parentheses were optional for arguments. For my example I thought business was a context and was trying to figure out the semantics for that. –  Brian Wong Nov 8 '11 at 17:29
    
I know a lot of Ruby developers who'll look at you very funny if you omit the parens in the definition of a method that takes any more than zero arguments. Consider them syntactically optional, but conventionally mandatory. :-) –  sheldonh Nov 8 '11 at 17:39
    
@BrianWong Yeah, I wondered if that was throwing you off--I should have said something explicitly. –  Dave Newton Nov 8 '11 at 17:41
1  
@sheldonh Most developers look at me funny, regardless of language. –  Dave Newton Nov 8 '11 at 17:46
    
@Dave Touche. :-) –  sheldonh Nov 8 '11 at 19:10

Given:

module SomeModule
  class SomeClass
    def hire_an_employee business
      # do stuff
  end
end

To use the function 'hire_an_employee'

k = SomeModule::SomeClass.new
k.hire_an_employee "woot"

Ps: You can omit the parens.

def foo(a)
  #do stuff
end

is the same as:

def foo a
  #do stuff
end
share|improve this answer
    
You can omit the parens no matter how many arguments. –  Dave Newton Nov 8 '11 at 17:26
    
Thank you dave. Fixed. –  Sean Vikoren Nov 9 '11 at 16:11

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