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I have a UISegmentedControl whose "Value changed" event is wired up in Interface Builder to call my controller's -(IBAction)segmentChangeAction:(id)sender;

When the user taps on the control to change the selected segment, as expected segmentChangeAction is called whether in iOS4 or iOS5.

When I programmatically change the selected segment through segmentedControl.selectedSegmentIndex = newIndex;, on iOS4 segmentChangeAction is called and the segment reflects the new selection. However on iOS5 segmentChangeAction is not called, yet the segment does reflect the new selection.

Is this a change in iOS5? Is there anything I can do to get segmentChangeAction called on iOS5 when I programmatically change the selection?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 53 down vote accepted

This is a change in iOS 5 in order for UISegmentedControl to be consistent with all other controls.

The idea is that the action should only fired automatically as a result of user interaction. Prior to iOS 5, UISegmentedControl's actions would be fired because of user interaction and programmatic interaction. However, initiating the change programmatically means that you can also do [myControl sendActionsForControlEvents:UIControlEventValueChanged] yourself.

However, you have to be careful with this. Say you do:

[segmentedControl setSelectedSegmentIndex:newIndex];
[segmentedControl sendActionsForControlEvents:UIControlEventValueChanged];

If you build and run this on iOS 5, it works as you expect. If you build and run this on iOS 4, you'll get your actions fired twice (once when you setSelectedSegmentIndex and again when you sendActions...).

The way around this is to do some sort of guard. This could be a runtime check to indicate that you're running on an iOS 5+ device, or could even be something more mundane, like this:

// changingIndex is a BOOL ivar
changingIndex = YES;
[segmentedControl setSelectedSegmentIndex:newIndex];
changingIndex = NO;
[segmentedControl sendActionsForControlEvents:UIControlEventValueChanged];

and then in your action method...

- (void)segmentedControlSelectedIndexChanged:(id)sender {
  if (!changingIndex) {
    // your action code here, guaranteed to only run as a result of the sendActions... msg
  }
}
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2  
Thanks for the in-depth explanation! I've done the simplest thing (calling segmentChangeAction directly after changing the index), having verified that there is no issue with this code being called twice on iOS<5. But I feel much happier knowing why I had to do this, thank you. –  Clafou Nov 8 '11 at 17:58
    
@Vin not this year; I'm way too busy to give it the attention being a moderator deserves. –  Dave DeLong Nov 8 '11 at 18:02
    
@Clafou you're welcome! And if you find a UIControl that does not follow this behavior, please file a bug and it'll get fixed. :) –  Dave DeLong Nov 8 '11 at 18:04
    
@Dave that's bad...looks like this year too we won't have anyone from iOS or objective c :( –  Vin Nov 8 '11 at 18:05
    
@Vin Brad Larson, BoltClock, and Moshe have been nominated and are all active in the Cocoa-related tags. –  Dave DeLong Nov 8 '11 at 18:07

I found another way, probably bit easier to understand you can extend UISegmentedControl and add target action in init methods and call a delegate method to trigger the value change

here is the example code

header file looks like this

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
@class CGUISegmentedControl;

@protocol CGUISegmentedControlDelegate <NSObject>

@optional
- (void) segmentedControl:(CGUISegmentedControl *) control valueChangedTo:(NSInteger) nValue;

@end

@interface CGUISegmentedControl : UISegmentedControl

@property (nonatomic,unsafe_unretained) id <CGUISegmentedControlDelegate> delegate;

@end

.m file

    #import "CGUISegmentedControl.h"

@implementation CGUISegmentedControl

@synthesize delegate                = _delegateAction;

- (void) addTargetAction {

    [self addTarget:self action:@selector(indexChanged:) forControlEvents:UIControlEventValueChanged];

}

- (id)initWithFrame:(CGRect)frame
{
    self = [super initWithFrame:frame];
    if (self) {
        [self addTargetAction];
    }
    return self;
}

- (id) initWithCoder:(NSCoder *)aDecoder {

    self = [super initWithCoder:aDecoder];
    if (self) {
        [self addTargetAction];
    }
    return self;

}

- (id) initWithItems:(NSArray *)items {

    self = [super initWithItems:items];
   if (self) {
        [self addTargetAction];
    }
    return self;
}

- (id) init {

    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        [self addTargetAction];
    }
    return self;

}

- (void) indexChanged:(id) sender {

    if (_delegateAction && [_delegateAction respondsToSelector:@selector(segmentedControl:valueChangedTo:)])
        [_delegateAction segmentedControl:self valueChangedTo:self.selectedSegmentIndex];


}

@end

And you can set the delegate in the calling class

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