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This might be a silly question, but I'm a beginner in C#, so please bear with me.

What happens if I name a variable the same in both the base class and the sub class?

For example:

class BaseClass01
{
    int x = 10;
}

class SubClass01 : BaseClass01
{
    int x = 20;

    public int Multiplicative(int a)
    {
        return x * a;
    }
}

if a = 10, the answer I got was 200.

Does this mean variable "int x" in BaseClass01 is different from "int x" in SubClass01? Would anybody be able to provide an example that illustrate the differences?

Thanks in advance for helping me wrap my head around this confusing concept of inheritance!

Edit:

Based on the comments below, I tinkered with the code, and realized that when accessing methods from the base class, the "x" from the subclass does not carry over:

class BaseClass01
{
    int x = 10;

    public int Subtraction(int a)
    {
        return a - x;
    }
}

class SubClass01 : BaseClass01
{
    int x = 20;

    public int Multiplicative(int a)
    {
        x = x * a
        return x;
    }
}

private void button4_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        SubClass01 sb = new SubClass01();


        int answer1 = sb.Multiplicative(10);
        int answer2 = sb.Subtraction(answer1);

    }

Subtraction() continues to use the "x" value from BaseClass01 (i.e. x remains 10). Using protected keyword avoids the issue entirely.

Thanks for the explanations!

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This is why it's always a good idea to explicitly declare the access modifier for your class members. –  Joe Nov 8 '11 at 18:26
1  
It would be more interesting if you declared the base variable as protected. Typically you resolve this with this.x, base.x or just local x. –  ja72 Nov 8 '11 at 18:27
1  
This is a very important thing to learn, but since you are getting started remember to name variables appropriately, and that ideally no variables should be the same. Way easier to read and maintain. –  timmy Nov 8 '11 at 18:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes they are different fields that happen to have the same unqualified name.

You can think of:

public int Multiplicative(int a) { return x * a; }

as:

public int Multiplicative(int a) { return this.x * a; }

To access the BaseClass01.x, use the base keyword:

public int Multiplicative(int a) { return base.x * a; }

(You'd also need to make BaseClass01.x protected and mark SubClass01.x as new.)

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Yes because x in first class is private and drived class can not see it. But if make it (in base class) protected, and use it as this way, compiler gives you a warning:

Warning SubClass01.x hides inherited member BaseClass01 .x. Use the new keyword if hiding was intended.

in fact says you new it, so again is different.

and in this case is better to use new keyword.

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Yes , at first both X are private so they are accessible in their class only , but if x in parent class wasnt private we can get it by using base.x in subclass, the compiler will searc hfor variable in first block it declared

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if it wasn't private (and hidden) you wouldn't need to prefix it with base. –  Rune FS Nov 8 '11 at 18:28
1  
@RuneFS You would, to distinguish it from SubClass01.x. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Nov 8 '11 at 18:31
    
we need to distinguish two variable with same name –  DeveloperX Nov 8 '11 at 18:44
    
@BrankoDimitrijevic then read the comment again :) if it wasn't private (and **hidden**)´. If it's not hidden there's only one and if it's hidden you'd get a compiler warning which you hopefully treat as an error and go fix in which case you wouldn't need base either. The reason for the comment however was that this answer could be read as if you'd _always_ need to get to write base.` to get to something in the base class ("if x in parent class wasnt private we can get it by using base.x in subclass") –  Rune FS Nov 8 '11 at 19:13

There are two places in memory where an int is stored, so yes there are two (unrelated) variables declared here. If you want to only have one variable declared, and only a reference in the subclass then omit the second declaration and make the first one protected int x;

It helps to think about how a class is represented in memory as a record. Each field occupies its own memory space with either data (value types) or a pointer (reference types). In essence, what you type is what you get.

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Since they are both private, the subclass can only access its x variable.

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