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What I want to do seems pretty simple, but I can't find any answers on the web. I have an NSMutableArray of objects, let's say they are 'Person' objects. I want to sort the NSMutableArray by Person.birthDate which is an NSDate.

I think it has something to do with this method:

NSArray *sortedArray = [drinkDetails sortedArrayUsingSelector:@selector(???)];

In Java I would make my object implement Comparable, or use Collections.sort with an inline custom comparator...how on earth do you do this in Objective-C?

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17 Answers 17

up vote 1331 down vote accepted

Compare method

Either you implement a compare-method for your object:

- (NSComparisonResult)compare:(Person *)otherObject {
    return [self.birthDate compare:otherObject.birthDate];
}

NSArray *sortedArray;
sortedArray = [drinkDetails sortedArrayUsingSelector:@selector(compare:)];

NSSortDescriptor (better)

or usually even better:

NSSortDescriptor *sortDescriptor;
sortDescriptor = [[NSSortDescriptor alloc] initWithKey:@"birthDate"
                                              ascending:YES];
NSArray *sortDescriptors = [NSArray arrayWithObject:sortDescriptor];
NSArray *sortedArray;
sortedArray = [drinkDetails sortedArrayUsingDescriptors:sortDescriptors];

You can easily sort by multiple keys by adding more than one to the array. Using custom comparator-methods is possible as well. Have a look at the documentation.

Blocks (shiny!)

There's also the possibility of sorting with a block since Mac OS X 10.6 and iOS 4:

NSArray *sortedArray;
sortedArray = [drinkDetails sortedArrayUsingComparator:^NSComparisonResult(id a, id b) {
    NSDate *first = [(Person*)a birthDate];
    NSDate *second = [(Person*)b birthDate];
    return [first compare:second];
}];
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39  
The first example has a bug: You compare the birthDate instance variable in one object with the other object itself, rather than its birthDate variable. –  Martin Gjaldbaek May 17 '11 at 8:52
57  
@Martin: Thanks! Funny that nobody else noticed before I got 75 upvotes for it. –  Georg Schölly May 17 '11 at 11:18
49  
Because this is the accepted answer, and therefore probably considered definitive by most users, it might be helpful to add a 3rd, block-based example so that users will be aware it exists too. –  orange80 Dec 2 '11 at 20:30
4  
@orange80: I tried that. I don't own a Mac any more, so it would be nice if you could look at the code. –  Georg Schölly Dec 4 '11 at 20:25
4  
@GeorgSchölly: You got it exactly right. –  orange80 Dec 5 '11 at 0:07

See the NSMutableArray method sortUsingFunction:context:

You will need to set up a compare function which takes two objects (of type Person, since you are comparing two Person objects) and a context parameter.

The two objects are just instances of Person. The third object is a string, e.g. @"birthDate".

This function returns an NSComparisonResult: It returns NSOrderedAscending if PersonA.birthDate < PersonB.birthDate. It will return NSOrderedDescending if PersonA.birthDate > PersonB.birthDate. Finally, it will return NSOrderedSame if PersonA.birthDate == PersonB.birthDate.

This is rough pseudocode; you will need to flesh out what it means for one date to be "less", "more" or "equal" to another date:

NSComparisonResult compare(Person *firstPerson, Person *secondPerson, void *context) {
  if ([firstPerson birthDate] < [secondPerson birthDate])
    return NSOrderedAscending;
  else if ([firstPerson birthDate] > [secondPerson birthDate])
    return NSOrderedDescending;
  else 
    return NSOrderedSame;
}
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6  
Using sortUsingFunction:context: is probably the most c-ish way and definitly the most unreadable one. –  Georg Schölly Apr 30 '09 at 6:28
6  
What's wrong with a "c-ish" approach? It works fine. –  Alex Reynolds Apr 30 '09 at 6:32
9  
There's nothing really wrong with it, but I think there are now much better alternatives. –  Georg Schölly Apr 30 '09 at 6:43
5  
Perhaps, but I don't think it would be any less readable to someone from a Java background who might be looking for something similar to Java's abstract Comparator class, which implements compare(Type obj1, Type obj2). –  Alex Reynolds Apr 30 '09 at 6:51
3  
I get the sense a couple of you are looking for any reason whatsoever to criticize this perfectly fine answer, even if that criticism has very little technical merit. Weird. –  Alex Reynolds May 1 '09 at 17:59

I did this in iOS 4 using a block. Had to cast the elements of my array from id to my class type. In this case it was a class called Score with a property called points.

Also you need to decide what to do if the elements of your array are not the right type, for this example I just returned NSOrderedSame, however in my code I though an exception.

NSArray *sorted = [_scores sortedArrayUsingComparator:^(id obj1, id obj2){
    if ([obj1 isKindOfClass:[Score class]] && [obj2 isKindOfClass:[Score class]]) {
        Score *s1 = obj1;
        Score *s2 = obj2;

        if (s1.points > s2.points) {
            return (NSComparisonResult)NSOrderedAscending;
        } else if (s1.points < s2.points) {
            return (NSComparisonResult)NSOrderedDescending;
        }
    }

    // TODO: default is the same?
    return (NSComparisonResult)NSOrderedSame;
}];

return sorted;

PS: This is sorting in descending order.

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4  
You don't actually need the "(Score *)" casts in there, you can just do "Score *s1 = obj1;" because id will happily cast to anything without warning from the compiler :-) –  orange80 Dec 2 '11 at 20:28
    
right orange80 downcasting doesn't requires a cast before the weak variable. –  geekay May 3 '12 at 10:48
    
Thanks guys, I've removed the cast from the answer –  Chris May 6 '12 at 10:20
    
You should sort nil vs. not-nil to the top or bottom consistently, so the default end return might be return ((!obj1 && !obj2) ? NSOrderedSame : (obj1 ? NSOrderedAscending : NSOrderedDescending)) –  Scott Corscadden Aug 8 '12 at 18:53
    
heh Chris, i tried this code, I do hv a refresh in my program.. for the first time i does correct job, got a descending order output.. but when i refresh.( execute the same code with same data ) it changed the order, it was not descending.. Say i hv 4 objects in my array, 3 hv same data, 1 is differed. –  Nikesh K Sep 13 '12 at 7:12

Starting in iOS 4 you can also use blocks for sorting.

For this particular example I'm assuming that the objects in your array have a 'position' method, which returns an NSInteger.

NSArray *arrayToSort = where ever you get the array from... ;
NSComparisonResult (^sortBlock)(id, id) = ^(id obj1, id obj2) {
  if ([obj1 position] > [obj2 position]) { 
    return (NSComparisonResult)NSOrderedDescending;
  }
  if ([obj1 position] < [obj2 position]) {
    return (NSComparisonResult)NSOrderedAscending;
  }
  return (NSComparisonResult)NSOrderedSame;
};
NSArray *sorted = [arrayToSort sortedArrayUsingComparator:sortBlock];

Note: the "sorted" array will be autoreleased.

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Your Person objects need to implement a method, say compare: which takes another Person object, and return NSComparisonResult according to the relationship between the 2 objects.

Then you would call sortedArrayUsingSelector: with @selector(compare:) and it should be done.

There are other ways, but as far as I know there is no Cocoa-equiv of the Comparable interface. Using sortedArrayUsingSelector: is probably the most painless way to do it.

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I tried all, but this worked for me. In a class I have another class named "crimeScene", and want to sort by a property of "crimeScene".

This works like a charm!

NSSortDescriptor *sorter = [[NSSortDescriptor alloc] initWithKey:@"crimeScene.distance" ascending:YES];
[self.arrAnnotations sortUsingDescriptors:[NSArray arrayWithObject:sorter]];
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hello i want to sort something like this... i have one mutableArray that is arrFBFriends and it contain FBFriend class object as a element of the mutable Array, i want to sort mutable Array with FBFriend.name –  Jignesh B Nov 1 '13 at 5:35
NSSortDescriptor *sortDescriptor;
sortDescriptor = [[[NSSortDescriptor alloc] initWithKey:@"birthDate" ascending:YES] autorelease];
NSArray *sortDescriptors = [NSArray arrayWithObject:sortDescriptor];
NSArray *sortedArray;
sortedArray = [drinkDetails sortedArrayUsingDescriptors:sortDescriptors];

thanks its working fine...

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there is a missing step in gs 2nd answer, works fine then.

NSSortDescriptor *sortDescriptor;
sortDescriptor = [[[NSSortDescriptor alloc] initWithKey:@"birthDate"
                                              ascending:YES] autorelease];
NSArray *sortDescriptors = [NSArray arrayWithObject:sortDescriptor];
NSArray *sortedArray;
sortedArray = [drinkDetails sortedArrayUsingDescriptor:sortDescriptors];

(I did not write in the comment because I just logged in and without reputation, I can't comment :-/)

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The method call is actually "sortedArrayUsingDescriptors:", with an 's' at the end. –  LucasTizma May 13 '09 at 19:58
    
Thanks, haven't seen that 's'. –  Georg Schölly Jun 15 '09 at 16:20

iOS 4 blocks will save you :)

featuresArray = [[unsortedFeaturesArray sortedArrayUsingComparator: ^(id a, id b) {
 DMSeatFeature *first = ( DMSeatFeature* ) a;
 DMSeatFeature *second = ( DMSeatFeature* ) b;

 if ( first.quality == second.quality )
  return NSOrderedSame;
 else
 {
  if ( eSeatQualityGreen  == m_seatQuality
  || eSeatQualityYellowGreen == m_seatQuality
  || eSeatQualityDefault  == m_seatQuality )
  {
   if ( first.quality < second.quality )
    return NSOrderedAscending;
   else
    return NSOrderedDescending;
  }
  else // eSeatQualityRed || eSeatQualityYellow
  {
   if ( first.quality > second.quality )
    return NSOrderedAscending;
   else
    return NSOrderedDescending;
  }
 }
}] retain];

http://sokol8.blogspot.com/2011/04/sorting-nsarray-with-blocks.html a bit of description

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For NSMutableArray, use the sortUsingSelector method. It sorts it-place, without creating a new instance.

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Just an update: I too was looking for something that sorted the mutable array in place, there are now "sortUsing" equivalent methods for all the "sortedArrayUsing" methods as of iOS 7. Such as sortUsingComparator:. –  jmathew Nov 17 '13 at 19:01

i've used sortUsingFunction:: in some of my projects

int SortPlays(id a,  id b, void* context)
{
    Play* p1=a;
    Play* p2=b;
    if (p1.score<p2.score) return NSOrderedDescending;
    else if (p1.score>p2.score) return NSOrderedAscending;
    return NSOrderedSame;
}

...
[validPlays sortUsingFunction:SortPlays context:nil];
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I have created a small library of category methods, called Linq to ObjectiveC, that makes this sort of thing more easy. Using the sort method with a key selector, you can sort by birthDate as follows:

NSArray* sortedByBirthDate = [input sort:^id(id person) {
    return [person birthDate];
}]
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If you're just sorting an array of NSNumbers, you can sort them with 1 call:

[arrayToSort sortUsingSelector: @selector(compare:)];

That works because the objects in the array (NSNumber objects) implement the compare method. You could do the same thing for NSString objects, or even for an array of custom data objects that implement a compare method.

Here's some example code using comparator blocks. It sorts an array of dictionaries where each dictionary includes a number in a key "sort_key".

#define SORT_KEY @\"sort_key\"

[anArray sortUsingComparator: 
 ^(id obj1, id obj2) 
  {
  NSInteger value1 = [[obj1 objectForKey: SORT_KEY] intValue];
  NSInteger value2 = [[obj2 objectForKey: SORT_KEY] intValue];
  if (value1 > value2) 
{
  return (NSComparisonResult)NSOrderedDescending;
  }

  if (value1 < value2) 
{
  return (NSComparisonResult)NSOrderedAscending;
  }
    return (NSComparisonResult)NSOrderedSame;
 }];

The code above goes through the work of getting an integer value for each sort key and comparing them, as an illustration of how to do it. Since NSNumber objects implement a compare method, it could be rewritten much more simply:

 #define SORT_KEY @\"sort_key\"

[anArray sortUsingComparator: 
^(id obj1, id obj2) 
 {
  NSNumber* key1 = [obj1 objectForKey: SORT_KEY];
  NSNumber* key2 = [obj2 objectForKey: SORT_KEY];
  return [key1 compare: key2];
 }];

or the body of the comparator could even be distilled down to 1 line:

  return [[obj1 objectForKey: SORT_KEY] compare: [obj2 objectForKey: SORT_KEY]];

I tend to prefer simple statements and lots of temporary variables because the code is easier to read, and easier to debug. The compiler optimizes away the temporary variables anyway, so there is no advantage to the all-in-one-line version.

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-(NSMutableArray*) sortArray:(NSMutableArray *)toBeSorted 
{
  NSArray *sortedArray;
  sortedArray = [toBeSorted sortedArrayUsingComparator:^NSComparisonResult(id a, id b) 
  {
    return [a compare:b];
 }];
 return [sortedArray mutableCopy];
}
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why to pass in a mutable array, when a new array is returned. why to create a wrapper at all? –  vikingosegundo Jan 10 '13 at 15:40

I just done multi level sorting based on custom requirement.

//sort the values

    [arrItem sortUsingComparator:^NSComparisonResult (id a, id b){

        ItemDetail * itemA = (ItemDetail*)a;

        ItemDetail* itemB =(ItemDetail*)b;

        //item price are same

        if (itemA.m_price.m_selling== itemB.m_price.m_selling) {



            NSComparisonResult result=  [itemA.m_itemName compare:itemB.m_itemName];



            //if item names are same, then monogramminginfo has to come before the non monograme item

            if (result==NSOrderedSame) {

                if (itemA.m_monogrammingInfo) {

                    return NSOrderedAscending;

                }else{

                    return NSOrderedDescending;

                }

            }

            return result;

        }

        //asscending order

        return itemA.m_price.m_selling > itemB.m_price.m_selling;

    }];

https://sites.google.com/site/greateindiaclub/mobil-apps/ios/multilevelsortinginiosobjectivec

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+1 Just because this actually shows the returns values of the comparator. Thanks. –  Pedrom Jul 21 '13 at 18:53

Sorting NSMutableArray is very simple..

    NSMutableArray *arrayToFilter = [[NSMutableArray arrayWithObjects:@"Photoshop", @"Flex", @"AIR",@"Flash", @"Acrobat", nil] autorelease];

NSMutableArray *productsToRemove = [[NSMutableArray array] autorelease];
for (NSString *products in arrayToFilter) {
    if (fliterText && [products rangeOfString:fliterText options:NSLiteralSearch|NSCaseInsensitiveSearch].length == 0)
        [productsToRemove addObject:products];
}
[arrayToFilter removeObjectsInArray:productsToRemove];
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NSMutableArray *stockHoldingCompanies = [NSMutableArray arrayWithObjects:fortune1stock,fortune2stock,fortune3stock,fortune4stock,fortune5stock,fortune6stock , nil];

NSSortDescriptor *sortOrder = [NSSortDescriptor sortDescriptorWithKey:@"companyName" ascending:NO];

[stockHoldingCompanies sortUsingDescriptors:[NSArray arrayWithObject:sortOrder]];

NSEnumerator *enumerator = [stockHoldingCompanies objectEnumerator];

ForeignStockHolding *stockHoldingCompany;

NSLog(@"Fortune 6 companies sorted by Company Name");

    while (stockHoldingCompany = [enumerator nextObject]) {
        NSLog(@"===============================");
        NSLog(@"CompanyName:%@",stockHoldingCompany.companyName);
        NSLog(@"Purchase Share Price:%.2f",stockHoldingCompany.purchaseSharePrice);
        NSLog(@"Current Share Price: %.2f",stockHoldingCompany.currentSharePrice);
        NSLog(@"Number of Shares: %i",stockHoldingCompany.numberOfShares);
        NSLog(@"Cost in Dollars: %.2f",[stockHoldingCompany costInDollars]);
        NSLog(@"Value in Dollars : %.2f",[stockHoldingCompany valueInDollars]);
    }
    NSLog(@"===============================");
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