Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Using Observer pattern. I have a class, called Monitor for example, that is monitoring a collection of objects. The class is an Observer and each object in it's collection is a Subject. Currently the collection is implemented as a std::list of shared_ptr. In the Update method of the Monitor class I want to check if the update is coming from one of the objects in it's collection.

std::list<SomeSharedPointer> items_;
...
void Monitor::Update(Subject *subject)
{
    if(subject == something_)
    {
        DoSomething();
    }
    else if
    ??
    // if subject is one of the objects in our collection then do something..

}

Subject here is a raw pointer and my collection is a list of shared_ptr. How can I effectively check if the subject coming in is any one of the objects in my collection?

(Note my compiler, msvc, supports lambdas if there is an algorithmic solution requiring one)

UPDATE

I should add that I realize I can use a for loop over the container, but I'm wondering if there's a snazzier way.

UPDATE 2

SomeSharedPointer is a typedef for std::shared_ptr<SomeType> where SomeType derives from abstract class Subject (standard Observer pattern implementation). SomeType will at some point call Notify() which will call the Update() method for each observer.

share|improve this question
    
Sounds like a broken design. Normal observers do not have to make that check. On long runs, you are better with adding special observer for that type –  BЈовић Nov 8 '11 at 19:28
    
It's possible. It's a manager class that needs to make decisions based on the state of items it's monitoring. –  User Nov 8 '11 at 19:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
auto i = std::find_if(items_.begin(), items_.end(), 
    [=](const SomeSharedPointer& x) { return x.get() == subject; });

if (i != c.end())
{ 
    // Object found, and i is an iterator pointing to it
}

A little helper method can make this more readable:

typedef std::list<SomeSharedPtr> ObserverCollection;

// You can also add a const version if needed
ObserverCollection::iterator find_observer(Subject* s)
{
    return std::find_if(items_.begin(), items_.end(), 
        [=](const SomeSharedPointer& x) { return x.get() == s; });
}

Then, you use it like this if you need the iterator

auto i = find_observer(subject);
if (i != items_.end())
{
    // Object found
}

or simply like this if you don't:

if (find_observer(subject) != items_.end())
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
wait what happened to the boolean helper method you had? –  User Nov 8 '11 at 19:08
    
@User: It depends on what you want to do. Let me edit the post to get it back. Indeed, if you want to manipulate the object, you need an iterator to it. –  Alexandre C. Nov 8 '11 at 19:15
    
Also what does the = mean in [=] in the lambda expression? –  User Nov 8 '11 at 19:20
1  
[=] means capture variables referenced outside the scope of the lambda by value. –  Mranz Nov 8 '11 at 19:36
1  
@User: The [=] is here to capture the subject pointer inside the lambda. We capture it by value (we could have captured it by reference with [&]). –  Alexandre C. Nov 8 '11 at 19:56

If you don't have C++11 support for auto, declare the iterator the old fashioned way

for (auto iter = items_.begin(); iter != items_.end(); ++iter)
{
     if (subject == iter->get())
     {
         .. do stuff ..
     }
}

Shared pointer has a .get() function that returns the pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
it's a collection though, not single instance. –  User Nov 8 '11 at 18:50
    
Sorry, I assumed you were already iterating over the collection. –  Mranz Nov 8 '11 at 18:53

Since you said that the observer needs to make a decision based on a state of items it is monitoring, then you should add a method to the base class (Subject in your question) which returns an enum defining the item's state. Then based on the state, add a switch in the update method:

enum State{ STATE_1, STATE_2 };

void Monitor::Update(Subject *subject)
{
    switch( subject->getState() )
    {
      case STATE_1:
         // do something 1
         break;
      case STATE_2:
         // do something 2
         break;
      default:
         //error
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
it needs to make decisions based on the aggregate state rather than the state of any one item. –  User Nov 8 '11 at 19:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.