Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm confused on what an immutable type is. I know the float object is considered to be immutable, with this type of example from my book:

   class RoundFloat(float):
       def __new__(cls, val):
           return float.__new__(cls, round(val, 2))

Is this considered to be immutable, because of the class structure / hierarchy?, meaning float is at the top of the class and is its own method call. Similar to this type of example (even though my book says dict is mutable):

   class SortedKeyDict(dict):
       def __new__(cls, val):
           return dict.__new__(cls, val.clear())

Whereas something mutable has methods inside the class, with this type of example:

   class SortedKeyDict_a(dict):
       def example(self):
           return self.keys()

Also, for the last class(SortedKeyDict_a), if I pass this type of set to it:

d = (('zheng-cai', 67), ('hui-jun', 68),('xin-yi', 2))

without calling the example method, it returns a dictionary. The SortedKeyDict with __new__ flags it as an error. I tried passing integers to the RoundFloat class with __new__ and it flagged no errors. Can someone please enlighten me on why it works the way it does.

Please help with my understanding of immutable types vs non.

share|improve this question
    
You can also check out List assignment with [:] and python when to use copy.copy which I also answered for more info about mutability. –  agf Nov 8 '11 at 20:09
add comment

7 Answers

What? Floats are immutable? But can't I do

x = 5.0
x += 7.0
print x # 12.0

Doesn't that "mut" x?

Well you agree strings are immutable right? But you can do the same thing.

s = 'foo'
s += 'bar'
print s # foobar

The value of the variable changes, but it changes by changing what the variable refers to. A mutable type can change that way, and it can also change "in place".

Here is the difference.

x = something # immutable type
print x
func(x)
print x # prints the same thing

x = something # mutable type
print x
func(x)
print x # might print something different

x = something # immutable type
y = x
print x
# some statement that operates on y
print x # prints the same thing

x = something # mutable type
y = x
print x
# some statement that operates on y
print x # might print something different

Concrete examples

x = 'foo'
y = x
print x # foo
y += 'bar'
print x # foo

x = [1, 2, 3]
y = x
print x # [1, 2, 3]
y += [3, 2, 1]
print x # [1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1]

def func(val):
    val += 'bar'

x = 'foo'
print x # foo
func(x)
print x # foo

def func(val):
    val += [3, 2, 1]

x = [1, 2, 3]
print x # [1, 2, 3]
func(x)
print x # [1, 2, 3, 3, 2, 1]
share|improve this answer
1  
Note: Python list is mutable and python tuple is not.. –  jasimmk Oct 3 '13 at 15:57
    
What you explain means to me: mutable variables are passed by reference, immutable variables are passed by value. Is this correct ? –  Lorenz Meyer Feb 3 at 12:40
    
Almost, but not exactly. Technically, all variables are passed by reference in Python, but have a semantics more like pass by value in C. A counterexample to your analogy is if you do def f(my_list): my_list = [1, 2, 3]. With pass-by-reference in C, the value of the argument could change by calling that function. In Python, that function doesn't do anything. def f(my_list): my_list[:] = [1, 2, 3] would do something. –  morningstar Mar 12 at 22:11
    
Mutable types can be changed in place. Immutable types can not change in place. That's the way python sees the world. It is regardless of how variables are passed to functions. –  ychaouche Mar 13 at 11:23
add comment

You have to understand that Python represents all its data as objects. Some of these objects like lists and dictionaries are mutable, meaning you can change their content without changing their identity. Other objects like integers, floats, strings and tuples ... are objects that can not be changed. An easy way to understand that is if you have a look at an objects ID.

Below you see a string that is immutable. You can not change its content. It will through an error at you, if you try to change it. Also, if we assign new content, a new object is created instead of the contents being modified.

>>> s = "abc"
>>>id(s)
4702124
>>> s[0] 
'a'
>>> s[0] = "o"
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'str' object does not support item assignment
>>> s = "xyz"
>>>id(s)
4800100
>>> s += "uvw"
>>>id(s)
4800500

You can do that with a list and it will not change the objects identity

>>> i = [1,2,3]
>>>id(i)
2146718700
>>> i[0] 
1
>>> i[0] = 7
>>> id(i)
2146718700

To read more about Pythons data model you could have a look at the Python language reference here: http://docs.python.org/reference/datamodel.html

share|improve this answer
1  
oh well. I just realised it took me 10 min to write that answer, while someone else posted the same content with a similar link. –  sebs Nov 8 '11 at 20:22
add comment

First of all, whether a class has methods or what it's class structure is has nothing to do with mutability.

ints and floats are immutable. If I do

a = 1
a += 5

It points the name a at a 1 somewhere in memory on the first line. On the second line, it looks up that 1, adds 5, gets 6, then points a at that 6 in memory -- it didn't change the 1 to a 6 in any way. The same logic applies to the following examples, using other immutable types:

b = 'some string'
b += 'some other string'
c = ('some', 'tuple')
c += ('some', 'other', 'tuple')

For mutable types, I can do thing that actallly change the value where it's stored in memory. With:

d = [1, 2, 3]

I've created a list of the locations of 1, 2, and 3 in memory. If I then do

e = d

I just point e to the same list d points at. I can then do:

e += [4, 5]

And the list that both e and d points at will be updated to also have the locations of 4 and 5 in memory.

If I go back to an immutable type and do that with a tuple:

f = (1, 2, 3)
g = f
g += (4, 5)

Then f still only points to the original tuple -- you've pointed g at an entirely new tuple.

Now, with your example of

class SortedKeyDict(dict):
    def __new__(cls, val):
        return dict.__new__(cls, val.clear())

Where you pass

d = (('zheng-cai', 67), ('hui-jun', 68),('xin-yi', 2))

(which is a tuple of tuples) as val, you're getting an error because tuples don't have a .clear() method -- you'd have to pass dict(d) as val for it to work, in which case you'll get an empty SortedKeyDict as a result.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Whether an object is mutable or not depends on its type. This doesn't depend on whether or not it has certain methods, nor on the structure of the class hierarchy.

User-defined types (i.e. classes) are generally mutable. There are some exceptions, such as simple sub-classes of an immutable type. Other immutable types include some built-in types such as int, float, tuple and str, as well as some Python classes implemented in C.

A general explanation from the "Data Model" chapter in the Python Language Reference":

The value of some objects can change. Objects whose value can change are said to be mutable; objects whose value is unchangeable once they are created are called immutable.

(The value of an immutable container object that contains a reference to a mutable object can change when the latter’s value is changed; however the container is still considered immutable, because the collection of objects it contains cannot be changed. So, immutability is not strictly the same as having an unchangeable value, it is more subtle.)

An object’s mutability is determined by its type; for instance, numbers, strings and tuples are immutable, while dictionaries and lists are mutable.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Note though that only some extension types (you may want to review your definition of that, all of Python's builtin types are implemented in C) are immutable. Others (most, I'd dare say) are perfectly mutable. –  delnan Nov 8 '11 at 19:54
    
You're correct. I've revised my answer to be more accurate. –  taleinat Nov 8 '11 at 19:56
    
@delnan What do you call "extensions types" ? –  eyquem Nov 8 '11 at 23:05
    
@eyquem: I used the term "extension types" incorrectly in my answer, and delnan was referring to that. After his comment I revised my answer and avoided using this term. –  taleinat Nov 9 '11 at 8:54
add comment

Immutable:

  1. integers and other numerical types
  2. string types like str and unicode
  3. tuples

Mutable: everything else, like,

  1. lists
  2. dicts
  3. classes
  4. class instances
  5. etc.

And id()method is good way to tell. For example

For an integer:

>>> n = 1
>>> id(n)
**704
>>> n = n + 1
>>> n
2
>>> id(n)
**736

For a list:

>>> m = [1]
>>> id(m)
**416
>>> m.append(2)
>>> m
[1, 2]
>>> id(m)
**416
share|improve this answer
add comment

A mutable object has to have at least a method able to mutate the object. For example, the list object has the append method, which will actually mutate the object:

>>> a = [1,2,3]
>>> a.append('hello') # `a` has mutated but is still the same object
>>> a
[1, 2, 3, 'hello']

but the class float has no method to mutate a float object. You can do:

>>> b = 5.0 
>>> b = b + 0.1
>>> b
5.1

but the = operand is not a method. It just make a bind between the variable and whatever is to the right of it, nothing else. It never changes or creates objects. It is a declaration of what the variable will point to, since now on.

When you do b = b + 0.1 the = operand binds the variable to a new float, wich is created with te result of 5 + 0.1.

When you assign a variable to an existent object, mutable or not, the = operand binds the variable to that object. And nothing more happens

In either case, the = just make the bind. It doesn't change or create objects.

When you do a = 1.0, the = operand is not wich create the float, but the 1.0 part of the line. Actually when you write 1.0 it is a shorthand for float(1.0) a constructor call returning a float object. (That is the reason why if you type 1.0 and press enter you get the "echo" 1.0 printed below; that is the return value of the constructor function you called)

Now, if b is a float and you assign a = b, both variables are pointing to the same object, but actually the variables can't comunicate betweem themselves, because the object is inmutable, and if you do b += 1, now b point to a new object, and a is still pointing to the oldone and cannot know what b is pointing to.

but if c is, let's say, a list, and you assign a = c, now a and c can "comunicate", because list is mutable, and if you do c.append('msg'), then just checking a you get the message.

(By the way, every object has an unique id number asociated to, wich you can get with id(x). So you can check if an object is the same or not checking if its unique id has changed.)

share|improve this answer
1  
(I would just edit it, but it's under 6 characters). Do you mean to say "b = b + 0.1" on line two of your second example? –  timfreilly Jul 26 '13 at 3:45
1  
yes, thanks for the advice! –  nadapez Jan 4 at 1:25
add comment

One way of thinking of the difference:

Assignments to immutable objects in python can be thought of as deep copies, whereas assignments to mutable objects are shallow

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.