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A quick question.

if I have a property and an ivar declared with the same name:

in the .h file:

(Reminder*)reminder;
@property(nonatomic,strong)(Reminder*)reminder;

in the .m file, should I use the ivar or the property in the init method if I'm using ARC?

- (id)initWithReminder:(Reminder*)reminder_ {
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        reminder = reminder_;
    }
    return self;
}

Or should I use the property to get the benefit of the automatic reference counting like this:

- (id)initWithReminder:(Reminder*)reminder_ {
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        self.reminder = reminder_;
    }
    return self;
}

I'm not sure at which point in the object's initialization the properties become accessible with the dot notation.

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3  
if you use synthesize (i guess you do) and you use a modern compiler (i guess you do because of ios5) you don't need to declare the ivar, objective-c does that automatically for you. (this is not the answer to your question, just a sidenote). –  choise Nov 8 '11 at 19:49
    
This is a good thing to know, I always declared ivars for properties up to now. And yes, I do @synthesize the property with the default name. –  Alex Stone Nov 8 '11 at 20:35
    
Was about to tell you the same thing as @choise. And I believe you still get the benefit of ARC regardless of whether or not you use the property. –  Undeadlegion Nov 9 '11 at 11:25
2  
You don't even need @synthesize –  nielsbot Aug 30 '13 at 22:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 50 down vote accepted

Use direct access in partially constructed states, regardless of ARC:

- (id)initWithReminder:(Reminder*)reminder_ {
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        reminder = reminder_;
        // OR
        reminder = [reminder_ retain];
    }
    return self;
}

This is because self.whatever will trigger other side effects, such as Key-Value Observing (KVO) notifications, or maybe your class implements (explicitly) or a subclass overrides setWhatever: -- and that could expose your partially initialized instance to other APIs (including its own), which rightly assume they are dealing with a fully constructed object.

You could manually verify that a class is capable of operating in a partially initialized state, but that requires a lot maintenance and is (frankly) impractical or impossible when other people want to subclass your class. It requires a lot of time and maintenance, and there isn't substantiative benefit doing so, especially if you try to use the approach as a convention.

So the uniform manner which guarantees correctness is to use direct access in partially constructed states, and avoid using the accessors.

Note: I am using "partially constructed" because initialization is only half of the picture; -dealloc has similar caveats.

Some more detail as to why you should use direct access in partially constructed states (ARC || MRC) can be found here: Initializing a property, dot notation

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I'm a bit confused by this when it comes to subclass. If we shouldn't use self.propertyName in init methods, how do you access a parent class's property inside the init method of a subclass ? using _propertyName in subclass says undeclared variable, the only solution is to use self.propertyName. Example: stackoverflow.com/questions/16622776/… –  Zhang Apr 3 '14 at 8:54
    
@Zhang generally, you should avoid accessing the properties of the base class in initializers. that approach requires your derived class to know about its superclass' implementation, as well as all derived classes which could override the accessor implementations. in objc, you can actually end up calling (the uninitialized) derived class' overridden accessor methods. so you can avoid this headache/risk by: following the advice above, providing more appropriate initializers, using accessors on fully constructed instances, using less complex types (composition), convenience constructors, etc. –  justin Apr 25 '14 at 16:43
1  
@Zhang I think it is safe to call properties from superclass in subclass' init. By the time you reach "body" of subclass' init, superclass' init should have already finished. That means, superclass itself is (or at least should be, if written correctly) already initialized completely. Thus accessing its (= superclass') properties should be safe - even if you override the property in subclass. The problem is when you access the property in init in superclass. In such case, if you override setter in subclass, you may get there with partially initialized object. –  manicaesar Dec 8 '14 at 11:29
    
@manicaesar it's not very safe; especially as complexity of class hierarchies and classes increase: stackoverflow.com/questions/5932677/… -- true, one can make a provably safe design but who wants to verify that remains safe whenever the implementations are modified? it's complicated/tedious/error prone and doesn't buy you much. –  justin Dec 9 '14 at 15:01
    
@justin ok, so when I subclass UITableViewCell and want to add to add some custom UIView as a subview to its contentView in initialization, what should I do instead of: [self.contentView addSubview:someSubview]; ? –  manicaesar Dec 10 '14 at 12:56

No you shouldn't!

You can find description why here
Also apple recommend to don't do it. Read here

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