Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here's some code to illustrate the problem I'm running into. jsFiddle Demo

<div class="normal">
    <a href="#">Test</a>
    <a href="#">Test longer</a>
</div>
<div class="ib blockbyclass">
    <a href="#">Test</a>
    <a href="#">Test longer</a>
</div>
<div class="ib">
    <a href="#" style="display: block;">Test</a>
    <a href="#" style="display: block;">Test longer</a>
</div>
body{background-color: gray;}
div{float:left; margin: 5px;}
a {background-color: black; color: white;}
div.ib a {display: inline-block;}
div.normal > a {display: block;}
div.blockbyclass> a {display: block; }

I have a certain type of link that under most circumstances needs to be rendered as inline-block, but in a certain case needs to be rendered as block elements. Specifically, I want them to each appear on their own line and take up the entire area of the containing div. In this particular case, the div containing the links is set to float, so it will resize itself based on the largest of the links inside it. IE8, IE9, Firefox and Chrome render these links correctly, but no matter what I do IE7 refuses to forget the display: inline-block rule.

How can I make IE7 show these elements in "block" mode?

share|improve this question

11 Answers 11

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your problem is a hasLayout trigger by the inline-block setting. To quote http://www.satzansatz.de/cssd/onhavinglayout.html (my emphasis added):

"The display-property differs: while 'inline-block' sets haslayout = true, the flag will not be reset to false later on by overriding the value with 'block' or 'inline' in another rule set."

This is unlike most hasLayout triggers that can be reset. Therefore, I think to fix your problem, you need to think in reverse. You need to have block be your default for the a tag and then add a class to get your inline-block when you need it.

Sort of like http://jsfiddle.net/mmpX3/33/ where blockbyclass I replaced with inlinebyclass (which is really inline-block).

Updated Explanation: You probably noticed that when you switched to block after going from inline-block that it "sort of worked" (the lines of text still move down). That is because it is displaying as a block, but one that hasLayout as opposed to one that does not. I don't know your particular situation, but if you can set a width on the containing div then a secondary solution to that I proposed above of "thinking in reverse" is to then set a width: 100% in conjunction with your "resetting" to block, like so: http://jsfiddle.net/mmpX3/64/.

Updated Caution: I don't know if you have other css you plan to apply to the a tags, but if any of that triggers hasLayout then you will need to watch out for that (and perhaps find a different method). See for example this fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/mmpX3/69/ in which everything is set to block but because I put a min-height on the a tag, it still has the same issues as your original problem.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. I was hoping to avoid this approach, since I'm generating the ib-style buttons with a utility class and there's a lot of other stuff going on there. Avoiding applying the inline-block-generating class will require some hokey code, but it's looking like it may end up being the only way to get things to look the way I want them to. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 21 '11 at 20:19
    
Can you not keep all the code associated with the ib class in a baseButton class (or some such) and apply a second class ib as standard except in the case when you don't want it, in which case you still apply any other necessary changes for block display via blockbyclass? The point is to avoid setting inline-block (for IE7 anyway) in the css cascade unless actually desired. If you work with 3 classes, 1 for base styles, 1 for inline-block itself, and 1 for block then you avoid every setting inline-block unless you are actually using it. –  ScottS Nov 21 '11 at 20:25
    
I marked this as the answer, but gave the bounty to Galled (stackoverflow.com/q/8205404/120955). See his answer for an explanation. Thank you for all your time. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 27 '11 at 1:18
    
Well, I can't say I'm not slightly disappointed. However, I'm glad my info helped you in solving your issue. That is what the site is all about. –  ScottS Nov 27 '11 at 1:49

Update: moved from comments here:

The problem is on div floating. When you float an element, that will be outside of pages normal stream, so, IE will take for it width:0; height:0; and when you put some elements in it, they will create their own height and width and the floated-element will be rendered how can push them (my English is really bad, so sorry). First step, A is inline-block so its height is for example x. when you make it block it should fill its parent, but, in IE mind, its parent has width:0. so you should remove the first inline-block attribute from div.ib a OR you can create a fixed-width attribute for floated div element.

div { float: left; margin: 5px; width: 80px; } 

also, insofar as I know, W3C recommends that floated elements should have a fixed-width. - IE 6 needs a fixed height too to work correctly!!!

The another way -if you can and your solution allows you- is that change the first inline-block to inline just for IE:

display: inline-block; 
*display: inline; 

But the width solution (for div) is more standard and flexible.

END UPDATE

However, for overriding a css-attribute just in IE, you have 3 optional way to do:

  1. The first way is using conditional comment that makes it's content visible to IE only. A full example is something like this:

    <!-- visible to IE less that 7 (6, 5, etc) -->
    <!--[if lt IE 7]> <link href="/Content/ie6.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" /> <![endif]-->
    
    <!-- visible to IE 7 only -->
    <!--[if IE 7]> <link href="/Content/ie7.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" /> <![endif]-->
    
    <!-- visible to IE 8 only -->
    <!--[if IE 8]> <link href="/Content/ie8.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" /> <![endif]-->
    
    <!-- visible to IE 9 and above and also visible to other browsers -->
    <!--[if gt IE 8]><!--> <link href="/Content/normal.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" /> <!--<![endif]-->
    

    As you can see, you have many options to use conditional comment.

  2. The other way is using CSS specially selectors that make some selectors visible to IE and hide them from other browsers. A full example is:

    /* normal */
    your-selector{
    }
    
    /* visible to IE 6 only */
    * html your-selector{
    }
    
    /* visible to IE 7  only */
    *:first-child + html your-selector{
    }
    
    /* visible to IE 7 and above */
    html > body your-selector{
    }
    
    /* visible to IE 8 and above */
    html > /**/ body your-selector{
    }
    
  3. The third way that I know is using IE specialized css-properties:

    /* normal selector */
    your-selector{
        /* normal property, visible to all browsers */
        color: #FF0;
        padding: 20px auto 35px;
    
        /* use special properties in name/value for IE */
    
        /* visible to ie 6 only */
        _color: #FF0;
        _padding: 15px auto 30px;
    
        /* visible to ie 7 and below (7, 6, 5, ...) */
        *color:#FF0;
        *padding: 15px auto 30px;
    }
    

Let me know if you have any questions or need clarifications on any part.

share|improve this answer
5  
I'm amazed this has as many upvotes as it does, considering it does not address the actual issue (of course, I commend the questioner for upvoting it despite the fact that it did not address his issue). –  ScottS Nov 21 '11 at 20:01
1  
@StriplingWarrior I can understand your issue just now :D the problem is on div floating. When you float an element, that will be outside of pages normal stream, so, IE will take for it width:0; height:0; and when you put in it some elements, they will create their own height and width and the floated-element will be rendered how can push them (my English is really bad, so sorry). First step, A is inline-block so it height is for example x. when you make it block it should fill its parent, but, in IE mind, its parent has width 0! (continue in next comment) –  Javad_Amiry Nov 21 '11 at 20:56
1  
you should remove the first inline-block attribute from div.ib a OR you can create a fixed-width attribute for floated dev element. div { float: left; margin: 5px; width: 80px; } also, insofar as I know, W3C recommends that floated elements should have a fixed-width. -IE 6 needs a fixed height too to work correctly!!!-. –  Javad_Amiry Nov 21 '11 at 21:02
1  
You should update your answer to reflect to what is in the comments. The answer is not-so-good whereas the comments actually describe the real problem. –  MiG Nov 24 '11 at 21:20
1  
It is not that you might not know it too, it is that since Galled posted the answer prior to you, you should have just upvoted it. –  ScottS Nov 27 '11 at 1:35

Acording with this article display:inline-block has a similar behavior that display:inline in IE7, so you can make a litte change only to support IE7 (with a simple hack for IE):

div.ib a {
   display: inline-block; 
   *display: inline; /* IE7 and below */ 
}

I hope this works as you expected.


EDIT:

Ok. The problem are with the property hasLayout explaining here. Both zoom:1 and height:any_value activates the hasLayout, so meanwhile display:inline-block; *display:inline works to overwrite the next display:block declarations, putting a height:30px (for example) returns the property hasLayout. So the thing to do is remove the hasLayout as it says in this article.

I have this demo to show how works. Because height is practically untouchable I using padding-bottom and font-size to simulate the height in other browsers. Note that the width of the widest element is maintained.


EDIT2:

Have you are considerate jQuery solutions? (Only giving the elements different widths in IE7)

share|improve this answer
    
This does appear to enable IE7 to override the block attribute, but unfortunately it also makes it so that elements in ib divs without the blockbyclass applied will appear as inline. As I stated in the original question, "I have a certain type of link that under most circumstances needs to be rendered as inline-block." I need CSS styles like height to be applied, and those styles are ignored by inline elements. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 21 '11 at 18:29
    
Just going to ask you whether it was necessary that the attribute display:inline-block must be exactly explicit or it can be simulated in other way. –  Galled Nov 21 '11 at 18:48
    
@StriplingWarrior I updated my answer. –  Galled Nov 21 '11 at 19:37
    
I would be fine with inline-block being simulated by some other means, as long as the behavior is the same. In the demo given in your updated answer, the height: 30px is not applied because the *display: inline makes IE7 ignore the height value. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 21 '11 at 20:12
    
@StriplingWarrior I updated again, height:30px practically always cannot be applicable in IE7, and not because *display:inline since that after I applied display:block. Is for hasLayout and the only way I see to simulate the height is through padding. –  Galled Nov 21 '11 at 20:19

You can put styles for IE7 in a separate CSS and use a conditional comment to include it only for IE7.

<!--[if IE 7]>
<link ...your IE7 specific stylesheet goes here ... >
<![endif]-->

Make sure this piece of code is below the link to the regular css file.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you please elaborate on how I can use this technique in this specific case? I need the links to appear as inline-block elements in most cases, regardless of the user's browser. But I need to override that behavior in this one particular part of the page. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 8 '11 at 21:44
1  
Then you have to make a specific selector for them. If that part is inside a div with a specific class, you could do somethgin like div.ib.blockbyclass a { /* Matches all links inside the second div */ }. But that's just standard CSS rules. I would get rid of the inline style attribute you're using now. That is bound to give you problems. –  GolezTrol Nov 9 '11 at 8:22
    
You mean like this? jsfiddle.net/StriplingWarrior/UBxhV It still doesn't work. My problem is not with finding CSS selectors that will apply the styles I want. As I state in the original post, the problem is that IE7 refuses to make the new style truly override the old one. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 9 '11 at 15:21
    
It will if you follow my instructions. Put the override for IE7 in a separate CSS file, and link to it from within a conditional comment. That causes IE 7 to load that file, while every other browsers leaves it alone. You can set some other, more obvious styles to, to check if the file is indeed loaded. Also not that IE (just like Chrome) has a quite thorough caching, so it may have cached a previous/older version of your css. –  GolezTrol Nov 9 '11 at 15:41
    
I couldn't do that with jsfiddle, but I just did everything you said using local files on my hard drive, and I get exactly the same results in IE7 (of course, this breaks things for the other browsers because they no longer load the special override style). The thing is, I'm not trying to make IE7 behave differently from other browsers: I'm trying to make it behave the same as the other browsers. Even though all the CSS precedence rules say my block style needs to override the inline-block style, IE7 still renders the links as inline-block. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 9 '11 at 16:24
display: inline-block 

for IE7 looks like:

*display: inline;
zoom: 1
share|improve this answer
    
I've used that trick to convince block-level elements (like divs) to act like inline-block elements. Unfortunately, it appears to behave the same as display: inline-block when applied to links. jsfiddle.net/mmpX3/18 –  StriplingWarrior Nov 21 '11 at 16:54
    
jsfiddle.net/mmpX3/50 look in IE 7. you CAN set height to this link (*display: inline) –  bravedick Nov 21 '11 at 19:28
    
Yes, this allows you to set the height, but now the link doesn't extend to take up all the space it's given, like a block element should do. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 21 '11 at 19:55
    
in your example all elements have display:block. display: inline-block element never take all width: jsfiddle.net/mmpX3/65 –  bravedick Nov 21 '11 at 20:17
    
jsfiddle.net/mmpX3/68 compare IE7 and FF, Chrome –  bravedick Nov 21 '11 at 20:21

display: inline-block is not compatible in IE7 for elements which are not inline by default so IE will ignore this rule for DIVs. If you change the DIV to a SPAN for example then this example should work.

share|improve this answer
    
The display: inline-block; is on the links, not the divs. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 8 '11 at 21:42

Here's the thing: If you need the a tag anchors to render on their own lines, they are block elements, not inline... In fact, there's nothing about what you're saying that indicates a need for an inline-block. Your divs are floating, so they'll stack to the left, in a line (but not inline; they are outside the flow of the document, thus float).

Try this... let's strip it all down. Here's the HTML you gave us:

<div class="normal">
    <a href="#">Test</a>
    <a href="#">Test longer</a>
</div>
<div class="ib blockbyclass">
    <a href="#">Test</a>
    <a href="#">Test longer</a>
</div>
<div class="ib">
    <a href="#" style="display: block;">Test</a>
    <a href="#" style="display: block;">Test longer</a>
</div>

With the CSS you provided, in Safari and Firefox, I see three blocks with two links each, each on their own line. What you're seeing in IE7, however, isn't two inline-block elements, but just two inline elements – the reason for this is that inline-block is not supported in IE7 because of a hasLayout error (something Microsoft created to overcomplicate a simple issue). In other words, it can't forget inline-block because it simply doesn't understand inline-block (which you've misunderstood as necessary), and is treating a by its default display behavior (i.e. inline).

If they need to be on separate lines and take up the width of the container, all you have to do is this (demonstrated on .ib a, completely ignoring blockbyclass which seems to just be a red herring in this case):

.ib a {display:block;}

TADA! Width is inherited from the parent container, the a takes the default a stylings, and everything is happy. So take a look at this:

<div class="ib">
    <a href="#" style="display: block;">Test</a>
    <a href="#" style="display: block;">Test longer</a>
</div>

This, in this case, becomes redundant, and therefore unnecessary. You're already making those elements block.

<div class="ib">
    <a href="#">Test</a>
    <a href="#">Test longer</a>
</div>

You're simply overcomplicating something really very simple.

Here's a fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/dhYjZ/1/

share|improve this answer
    
The ib class was intended to simulate the class that I use system-wide for buttons, which applies inline-block because they normally have to be able to appear inline with each other, but still have block-oriented properties like height and margin applied. I was hoping I could override the ib class to make these buttons appear in block form in a specific case (the way the example works in all other browsers), but it sounds like hasLayout is going to make this impossible for me to do in IE7. I'll probably have to create another class that clones ib, but with block layout. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 23 '11 at 14:59

It appears that float is to blame here. It is not that IE7 does not mark the item as block, I think it is due to the div float not having a width. This can be seen here:

http://jsfiddle.net/mmpX3/129/

Typically, when working with older browsers, I have found that floated elements in <= IE7 tend to need a fixed width setting to avoid issues.

In your case, I would suggest adding a fixed width as the JS Fiddle, or remove the float if it is not needed. If I can see the use case for the floated div, I may be able to come up with an alternative.

Why a combination of float and display:inline-block stops display:block from being re-instanted, I don't know. It sounds like a typical IE7 bug that can be worked around.

share|improve this answer

I'm not quite sure what is the end-result that you are after. Are you trying to make the black background to be a whole rectangle that encapsulates both links instead of 2 rectangles (1 for each link)?

If so, why not apply the background to the DIV instead of the links?

EDIT: It seems that there's a bug with IE7 that makes it display elements in a mixture of block and inline-block when one of the rules that applies to the element has display: inline-block even if another value for display takes precedence.

If you see http://jsfiddle.net/P2N5c/16/ , it doesn't matter if the rule that has display: block is the first one (like the one using the #blocky rule) or if it's the last one.

So far I'm not sure how to prevent this bug, but you could bypass it by avoid giving the links both ib and blockbyclass and just giving it the classes that make them blocks. I.e. don't give them ib. Instead of adding a class to toggle the states for the DIV, replace one class for the other.

share|improve this answer
    
For future reference, clarifying questions should generally be posted as comments instead of answers. I'm trying to make all of the buttons take up as much space as the longest button in the list, so if you click anywhere within the button area it will have the same effect as clicking on the text. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 23 '11 at 14:53
    
@StriplingWarrior Yesterday I didn't have commenting priviledges. One more clarification, you mention you have a DIV with just ib and then also get a DIV with both ib blockbyclass. Is blockbyclass added with script or is it there when the page loads? Oh I get it, the anchors get the newline but fail to grab the whole width (in IE7). –  frozenkoi Nov 24 '11 at 20:35

Simply put, I replace all of my display:inline-block; usages with display:inline;, and I also do so conditionally, as with the answers provided above.

With your example, I find success with the following:

body{background-color: gray;}
div{float:left; margin: 5px;}
a {background-color: black; color: white;display:block;}

Jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/zL3Ea/

share|improve this answer
    
May I enquire... why the minus? The code above makes the links inside the floated divs because blockish in all of your specified browsers. –  Danjah Nov 21 '11 at 1:18
    
For the record: I'm not the one who -1'd you. However, I'm confused at the difference between what you explain in your first paragraph and what you actually do in your posted code. The code doesn't have any display:inline; in it, or any conditional selectors. Was that just an oversight? –  StriplingWarrior Nov 21 '11 at 16:51
    
Sorry, it was just more of a general approach to handling display:inline-block; for IE7. The second part should be the juiciest. –  Danjah Nov 21 '11 at 21:47
    
The second part just gets rid of the inline-block directive that I need to have applied whenever my blockbyclass class is not present. I'm afraid that's not really helpful. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 21 '11 at 22:26

Seems like jobs done. I am fork your code, try it: http://jsfiddle.net/Lkwzx/1/

Secret in this line: div.ib a { display: inline-block; *display: inline; }

share|improve this answer
    
For the record, I didn't downvote this. But it is the same as Galled's answer, and like his it does not make ib links have inline-block applied when blockbyclass is not present. –  StriplingWarrior Nov 21 '11 at 18:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.