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Is it possible to calculate the average time to reply to a message just with the following columns:

id | ref | client | admin | date | message
  • id is the unique message number
  • ref is the message reference number, which is not unique (searching for ref, ordering by date will show a conversation)
  • client is ID of client, if it is a client message, else 0 if not a client
  • admin is ID of admin, if it is an admin message, else 0 if not a client
  • date is set up using datetime being the time of the message
  • message being the message sent

Example Data:

1  | 1   | 1      | 0     | 2011-11-07 01:00:00 | ABC
2  | 1   | 1      | 0     | 2011-11-07 01:01:00 | DEF
3  | 1   | 0      | 1     | 2011-11-07 01:05:00 | abc
4  | 2   | 2      | 0     | 2011-11-07 01:10:00 | 123
5  | 3   | 1      | 0     | 2011-11-07 01:11:00 | abc
6  | 2   | 0      | 1     | 2011-11-07 01:20:00 | a
7  | 3   | 0      | 2     | 2011-11-07 02:11:00 | b

Ideally looking for the average time period between a client message and an admin message, though if there are 2 client messages from the same client (ie. admin didn't reply to first message before client added their 2nd message) with the same ref.

From example, time for (1) = 5 minutes, (2) = 10 minutes, (3) = 60 minutes ... average = 25 minutes (1500 seconds - happy to get work with seconds)

I'm not sure how to even begin working on this.... I do hope someone can help :S

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Difficult to pick which to accept, so went with first in - if only could choose 2! –  MrJ Nov 8 '11 at 23:55
    
You can always upvote the second if it helped you, too ... –  Erwin Brandstetter Nov 9 '11 at 0:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your question is well formulated but leaves room for interpretation. This is one interpretation:

SELECT avg(TIMESTAMPDIFF(SECOND, c.c_date, a.a_date) AS avg_time_to_response
FROM   (
    SELECT ref, min(date) AS c_date
    FROM   tbl
    WHERE  client > 0
    GROUP  BY 1
    ) c
JOIN  (
    SELECT ref, min(date) AS a_date
    FROM   tbl
    WHERE  admin > 0
    GROUP  BY 1
    ) a USING (ref)
WHERE a.a_date > c.c_date;

Gives you the average time that passes between the first client posting and the first admin posting per thread (message reference number).

Unanswered messages are ignored. Threads started by Admins would confuse the result with negative durations, so I excluded those. Only the first response time per thread goes into the result. Additional postings on the same thread are ignored here.

Read the manual here about TIMESTAMPDIFF().
Thanx to @MrJ and @Vincent for pointing out the mistake with the subtraction of timestamps!

Concerning GROUP BY 1

I quote the manual here:

Columns selected for output can be referred to in ORDER BY and GROUP BY clauses using column names, column aliases, or column positions. Column positions are integers and begin with 1:

Emphasis mine. So I group on the first column that is selected (ref in both cases). Just a notational shortcut.

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Not sure what the GROUP BY 1 part refers to above. How about per message? Say client 1 decides to reply to the first message again and the admin replies a bit later? –  MrJ Nov 8 '11 at 23:05
    
I see you've made a few mods - will try this out! –  MrJ Nov 8 '11 at 23:06
    
Should we use UNIX_TIMESTAMP somewhere to convert to timestamp? As I get a number with a lot of 0 decimals –  MrJ Nov 8 '11 at 23:09
    
@MrJ: I amended my answer with info on GROUP BY 1. –  Erwin Brandstetter Nov 8 '11 at 23:11
1  
@Erwin Brandstetter : This won't work due to MySQL's way of handling date operations. MySQL will just dumbly convert dates to integers, (2011-11-08 12:00:00 will become 20111108120000) and it will substract those integers. –  Vincent Savard Nov 8 '11 at 23:14

Needless to say, I hate working with MySQL :

SELECT AVG(delay_answer)
FROM (SELECT MIN(delay_answer) AS delay_answer
      FROM (SELECT M1.ref, client, admin, TIMESTAMPDIFF(SECOND, date_original, date) AS delay_answer
            FROM messages M1
            INNER JOIN (SELECT ref, MIN(date) AS date_original
                        FROM messages
                        GROUP BY ref) M2
            ON M1.ref = M2.ref AND date > date_original
            WHERE admin <> 0 AND client = 0) x
      GROUP BY ref) y;

This returns the average time (in seconds) that it took for an admin to answer a message (created by anyone, not necessarily a client, but this can easily be changed).

share|improve this answer
    
What if the admin were to write a message on behalf of the client, where say in the database client and admin would both have a number, could you ignore the client number in this case? –  MrJ Nov 8 '11 at 23:25
    
@MrJ : You just have to change the condition admin <> 0 to 0 NOT IN (admin, client) –  Vincent Savard Nov 8 '11 at 23:27
    
Hmmm... I get null as the average now –  MrJ Nov 8 '11 at 23:31
    
@MrJ : My bad, actually the condition should be admin <> 0 AND client = 0, I edited my post. –  Vincent Savard Nov 8 '11 at 23:37
    
+1 for the hint on timestamp subtraction. –  Erwin Brandstetter Nov 9 '11 at 0:06

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