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Previous investigation in Can I make a table of String + lambdas that have the same signature? showed me that I can in fact have a table of strings + lambdas in VS2010.

Things were looking good while the lambdas were void return type. But having tried to change them to bool return type, the compiler seems to get it wrong, or there's some sort of a memory corruption error... something's not right in C++ land...

The following illustrates the scenario:

// fun: use a table of lambdas to define what to do in order to update each field
typedef std::function<bool (CDynamicMenuItem *, ITEM *)> LambdaType;
struct UpdateField {
    const TCHAR *   label;
    LambdaType      lambda; // this version allows us to use captures in our lambdas, whereas the following doesn't
    //void (*lambda)(CDynamicMenuItem *, ITEM *);   // this would work in VS11, but the conversion of lambda to function pointer was defined after 2010's release!
};
UpdateField MenuFields[] = {
    { "Identity",   [] (CDynamicMenuItem * pMenuItem, ITEM * pNearestItem) ->bool { return pMenuItem->SetText(FString("%s/%.1f", pNearestItem->thissec->name, pNearestItem->number/10.0)), true; } },
    { "X1",         [] (CDynamicMenuItem * pMenuItem, ITEM * pNearestItem) ->bool { double v = GetX1(pNearestItem); return (v != v) ? false : pMenuItem->SetValue(v), true; } },
    { "Y1",         [] (CDynamicMenuItem * pMenuItem, ITEM * pNearestItem) ->bool { double v = GetY1(pNearestItem); if (v != v) return false; pMenuItem->SetValue(v); return true; } },
    { "X2",         [] (CDynamicMenuItem * pMenuItem, ITEM * pNearestItem) ->bool { double v = GetX2(pNearestItem); if (v != v) return false; pMenuItem->SetValue(v); return true; } },
    { "Y2",         [] (CDynamicMenuItem * pMenuItem, ITEM * pNearestItem) ->bool { double v = GetY2(pNearestItem); if (v != v) return false; pMenuItem->SetValue(v); return true; } },
    { "Xd",         [] (CDynamicMenuItem * pMenuItem, ITEM * pNearestItem) ->bool { double v = GetXd(pNearestItem); if (v != v) return false; pMenuItem->SetValue(v); return true; } },
    { "Yd",         [] (CDynamicMenuItem * pMenuItem, ITEM * pNearestItem) ->bool { double v = GetYd(pNearestItem); if (v != v) return false; pMenuItem->SetValue(v); return true; } },
    { "Angle",      [] (CDynamicMenuItem * pMenuItem, ITEM * pNearestItem) ->bool { double v = GetAngle(pNearestItem); if (v != v) return false; pMenuItem->SetValue(v); return true; } },
    { "Length",     [] (CDynamicMenuItem * pMenuItem, ITEM * pNearestItem) ->bool { double v = GetLength(pNearestItem); if (v != v) return false; pMenuItem->SetValue(v); return true; } },
};

for (UpdateField * it = &MenuFields[0], * end = (MenuFields + countof(MenuFields)); it != end; ++it)
{
    CDynamicMenuItem * pMenuItem = pMenu->FindItem(it->label);
    if (pMenuItem)
    {
        if (!m_pNearestItem || !it->lambda(pMenuItem, m_pNearestItem))
            pMenuItem->SetText("");
    }
}

The above worked beautifully when the lambda's return type is void (i.e. ->bool is omitted, and the various lambda bodies are modified to not return anything, etc.).

However, it's useful to me to have them return a bool indicating whether or not the lambda was able to process data for that field, and if not, to have the caller handle clearing that field.

To be certain, the code compiles & runs... until it hits this code & CRASHES. Looking at "MenuFields[]" in the debugger shows garbage for most of the MenuField[x].label addresses (sometimes one of them is correct, but I haven't figured out what the pattern is).

I thought maybe the compiler was glitching over the syntax of the lambda embedded in the static initialization list, but I'm not sure what I can do about that?

I tried this variation:

    { "Identity",   LambdaType( [] (CDynamicMenuItem * pMenuItem, ITEM * pNearestItem) ->bool { return pMenuItem->SetText(FString("%s/%.1f", pNearestItem->thissec->name, pNearestItem->number/10.0)), true; } ) },

The compiler likes this equally well, but it results in the same corrupted table data.

Similarly, putting parenthesis around the entire lambda is okay by the compiler, and equally corrupt at runtime.

So, some questions:

  1. Do you see something I overlooked?
  2. Can you think of a work around to get the compiler to generate the correct code (other than going back to void return - which is plausible for my scenario, and my likely next step barring a better suggestion)?
  3. Know how best to report this to Microsoft? [I have had no luck finding actual human beings on the other end to give this sort of detailed info to so that it actually goes somewhere other than >nul)
share|improve this question
    
Shouldn't your typedef also reflect that the return type is different? –  Michael Price Nov 8 '11 at 22:11
    
!@# Sorry, my code is in flux - fixed my question to reflect the corrected code (compiler won't even compile unless they agree) –  Mordachai Nov 8 '11 at 22:13
1  
"To be certain, the code compiles & runs." If this is the case, it sounds like a debugger issue, not a compiler issue. Visual Studio bugs may be reported at Microsoft Connect. –  James McNellis Nov 8 '11 at 22:35
    
Sometimes communication is hard! lol - I meant that it compiles, links, runs, and CRASHES :) –  Mordachai Nov 8 '11 at 22:37
    
I see. That is more interesting then. :-) –  James McNellis Nov 8 '11 at 22:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is indeed a bug in the Visual C++ compiler. See the bug report "miscompilation of aggregate initializer with lambdas inside".

As a workaround, consider not using the aggregate initialization here. Instead, you could use a std::vector:

UpdateField MakeUpdateField(char const* label, LambdaType const lambda)
{
    UpdateField f = { label, lambda };
    return f;
}

std::vector<UpdateField> fields = ([]() -> std::vector<UpdateField>
{
    std::vector<UpdateField> data;
    data.push_back(MakeUpdateField("Identity", [] { /* contents omitted */ }));
    data.push_back(MakeUpdateField("X1",       [] { /* contents omitted */ }));
    data.push_back(MakeUpdateField("Y1",       [] { /* contents omitted */ }));
    return data;
})();

(If your data is a mapping of names to lambdas, you might also consider using a std::map, which might provide better performance characteristics or might be easier to use.)

share|improve this answer
    
It's a very short, linear accessed list of things used only in this scenario (update the list of fields in the UI 1, 2, .., n) where n < 15, so easy-peasy. :) –  Mordachai Nov 9 '11 at 4:30
    
As long as N is known, at compile-time, you can substitute std::array<UpdateField, N> into the example I show (and replace push_back with direct element access (using [n]) and you'll have effectively the same code that you have now, except that it will work around the aforementioned bug. –  James McNellis Nov 9 '11 at 6:04
    
One of the advantages to inline initialization is that the compiler can figure out how many are in the table - and it can be added to or reduced at will w/o changing the rest of the code. I'll just use the push_back mechanism to preserve that ;) –  Mordachai Nov 9 '11 at 15:15
    
FYI - your lambda to initialize the fields vector won't compile for me on VS2010. Literally crashes the compiler every time. :O So, instead I just use the push_back() directly, rather than wrapping them in a lambda. Works great - thank you! –  Mordachai Nov 9 '11 at 19:52
    
I see. I vaguely recall a bug similar to that, now that you mention it (I can't keep track of all the bugs all the time ;-)). I'm glad you found a solution anyway. –  James McNellis Nov 9 '11 at 21:24

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