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I am developing an agent-based labor market model in python/numpy. The model focuses on the process of matching workers and firms, which are characterized by l-dimensional bit strings. Workers and firms with closely matching bit strings are matched together.

At this point, the model runs properly and produces the correct output. However, it is extremely slow. It takes around 77 seconds for 20 iterations. (I am running the model on a Macbook Pro with an i5 processor and 8GB of RAM). By comparison, I originally wrote the model in R, where 20 iterations takes roughly 0.5 seconds. This seems really strange as from everything I have read python should be faster than R for looping and other programming functions.

I have spent a good deal of time trying to optimize the code and looking into problems with numpy. Additionally, I tried running the model in Sage, but don't notice any difference.

I am attaching key segments of the code below. Please let me know if there are problems with the code or if there are other problems with numpy I may have missed.

Thanks,

Daniel Scheer

Code:

from __future__ import division
from numpy import*
import numpy as np
import time
import math as math

NUM_WORKERS         = 1000
NUM_FIRMS           = 65
ITERATIONS          = 20
HIRING_THRESHOLD    = 0.4
INTERVIEW_THRESHOLD = 0.2
RANDOM_SEED         = 1
SKILLSET_LENGTH     = 50
CONS_RETURN         = 1
INC_RETURN          = 1
RETURN_COEFF        = 1.8
PRODUCTIVITY_FACTOR = 0.001

#"corr" function computes closeness between worker i and firm j
def corr(x,y):
    return 1-(np.sum(np.abs(x-y))/SKILLSET_LENGTH)

#"skill_evolve" function randomly changes a segment of the firm's skill demand bit string
def skill_evolve(start,end,start1,q,j,firms):
    random.seed(q*j)
    return around(random.uniform(0,1,(end-start1)))

#"production" function computes firm output
def production(prod):
    return (CONS_RETURN*prod)+math.pow(INC_RETURN*prod,RETURN_COEFF)

#"hire_unemp" function loops though unemployed workers and matches them with firms
def hire_unemp(j):
    for i in xrange(NUM_WORKERS):
        correlation = corr(workers[(applicants[i,0]-1),9:(9+SKILLSET_LENGTH+1)],firms[j,4:(4+SKILLSET_LENGTH+1)])
        if (workers[(applicants[i,0]-1),3] == 0 and correlation > HIRING_THRESHOLD and production(correlation*PRODUCTIVITY_FACTOR) >= (production((firms[j,2]+(correlation*PRODUCTIVITY_FACTOR))/(firms[j,1]+1)))):
            worker_row = (applicants[i,0]-1)
            workers[worker_row,3] = firms[j,0]
            workers[worker_row,4] = correlation
            workers[worker_row,5] = (workers[worker_row,4]+workers[worker_row,1])*PRODUCTIVITY_FACTOR
            firms[j,1] = firms[j,1]+1
            firms[j,2] = firms[j,2]+workers[worker_row,5]
            firms[j,3] = production(firms[j,2])
            workers[worker_row,7] = firms[j,3]/firms[j,1]
            #print "iteration",q,"loop unemp","worker",workers[worker_row,0]
            break

#"hire_unemp" function loops though employed workers and matches them with firms 
def hire_emp(j):
    for i in xrange(NUM_WORKERS):
        correlation = corr(workers[(applicants[i,0]-1),9:(9+SKILLSET_LENGTH+1)],firms[j,4:(4+SKILLSET_LENGTH+1)])
        if (workers[(applicants[i,0]-1),3] > 0 and correlation > HIRING_THRESHOLD and (production((firms[j,2]+(correlation*PRODUCTIVITY_FACTOR))/(firms[j,1]+1) > workers[(applicants[i,0]-1),7]))):
            worker_row = (applicants[i,0]-1)
            otherfirm_row = (workers[worker_row,3]-1)
            #print q,firms[otherfirm_row,0],firms[otherfirm_row,1],"before"
            firms[otherfirm_row,1] = firms[otherfirm_row,1]-1
            #print q,firms[otherfirm_row,0],firms[otherfirm_row,1],"after"
            firms[otherfirm_row,2] = array([max(array([0], float),firms[otherfirm_row,2]-workers[worker_row,5])],float)
            firms[otherfirm_row,3] = production(firms[otherfirm_row,2])
            workers[worker_row,3] = firms[j,0]
            workers[worker_row,4] = correlation
            workers[worker_row,5] = (workers[worker_row,4]+workers[worker_row,1])*PRODUCTIVITY_FACTOR
            firms[j,1] = firms[j,1]+1
            firms[j,2] = firms[j,2]+workers[worker_row,5]
            firms[j,3] = CONS_RETURN*firms[j,2]+math.pow(INC_RETURN*firms[j,2],RETURN_COEFF)
            workers[worker_row,7] = firms[j,3]/firms[j,1]
            #print "iteration",q,"loop emp","worker",workers[worker_row,0]
            break

workers = zeros((NUM_WORKERS,9+SKILLSET_LENGTH))
workers[:,0] = arange(1,NUM_WORKERS+1)
random.seed(RANDOM_SEED*1)
workers[:,1] = random.uniform(0,1,NUM_WORKERS)
workers[:,2] = 5
workers[:,3] = 0
workers[:,4] = 0
random.seed(RANDOM_SEED*2)
workers[:, 9:(9+SKILLSET_LENGTH)] = around(random.uniform(0,1,(NUM_WORKERS,SKILLSET_LENGTH)))

random.seed(RANDOM_SEED*3)
firms = zeros((NUM_FIRMS, 4))
firms[:,0] = arange(1,NUM_FIRMS+1)
firms = hstack((firms,around(random.uniform(0,1,(NUM_FIRMS,SKILLSET_LENGTH)))))

start_full = time.time()

for q in arange(ITERATIONS):
    random.seed(q)
    ordering = random.uniform(0,1,NUM_WORKERS).reshape(-1,1)
    applicants = hstack((workers, ordering))
    applicants = applicants[applicants[:,(size(applicants,axis=1)-1)].argsort(),]

    #Hire workers from unemployment
    start_time = time.time()
    map(hire_unemp, xrange(NUM_FIRMS))
    print "Iteration unemp %2d: %2.5f seconds" % (q, time.time() - start_time)

    #Hire workers from employment
    start_time = time.time()
    map(hire_emp, xrange(NUM_FIRMS))
    print "Iteration emp %2d: %2.5f seconds" % (q, time.time() - start_time)
share|improve this question
6  
You're missing the point of numpy. You literally translated your code from R. It uses numpy in a sub-optimal way several cases. Don't assign values to a particular item of a numpy array inside a loop if you can avoid it (and you almost always can). –  Joe Kington Nov 8 '11 at 22:18
1  
In other words, avoid loops when possible, working on the whole array at once. This is too much code to fix, but if you have a more specific subproblem, would be glad to help. What is the bottleneck in this code according to you? –  Benjamin Nov 9 '11 at 0:10
1  
Try RPy if you want to use R code inside of Python. Otherwise, try Cython if you want to write things loop-wise and compile them down to callable Python functions. I can sympathize with you. I don't like the NumPy/Matlab philosophy of optimizing by requiring the programmer to think in vectorized operations. Many scientific algorithms are more readable and better understood in loops, not to mention more extensible. For that reason, I think Cython is worth the extra effort. Then you can have NumPy convenience functions around your faster core code. –  EMS Feb 8 '12 at 1:31
    
You can speed this up by orders of magnitude by vectorizing your code. As an example of what I mean, look at the first two examples at technicaldiscovery.blogspot.com/2011/06/…. Learning to vectorize your programs will be a good investment of your time. I would start by reading about broadcasting and fancy indexing. –  DanB Feb 11 '13 at 19:02
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