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I want to create excel files in Groovy, then have them plotted. This code was taken from an example using Microsoft's Shell Scripting language:

Set objExcel = CreateObject("Excel.Application")
objExcel.Visible = True
Set objWorkbook = objExcel.Workbooks.Add()
Set objWorksheet = objWorkbook.Worksheets(1)

objWorksheet.Cells(1,1) = "Operating System"
objWorksheet.Cells(2,1) = "Windows Server 2003"
objWorksheet.Cells(3,1) = "Windows XP"
objWorksheet.Cells(5,1) = "Windows NT 4.0"
objWorksheet.Cells(6,1) = "Other"

objWorksheet.Cells(1,2) = "Number of Computers"
objWorksheet.Cells(2,2) = 145
objWorksheet.Cells(3,2) = 987
objWorksheet.Cells(4,2) = 611
objWorksheet.Cells(5,2) = 41
objWorksheet.Cells(6,2) = 56

Set objRange = objWorksheet.UsedRange
objRange.Select

Set colCharts = objExcel.Charts
colCharts.Add()

Set objChart = colCharts(1)
objChart.Activate

objChart.HasLegend = FALSE
objChart.ChartTitle.Text = "Operating System Use"

How would I modify this to work in Groovy?

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As Tim pointed out, POI doesn't support charts, so never mind. –  Dave Newton Nov 8 '11 at 23:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You need groovy to work with COM. Towards the bottom of this page is an example of automating Excel.

EDITS

Here's your example translated into Groovy (I ran this under Groovy 1.8.2):

import org.codehaus.groovy.scriptom.*
import org.codehaus.groovy.scriptom.tlb.office.excel.XlChartType
import org.codehaus.groovy.scriptom.tlb.office.excel.XlRowCol
import org.codehaus.groovy.scriptom.tlb.office.excel.XlChartLocation

// create a xls instance
def xls = new ActiveXObject("Excel.Application")

xls.Visible = true

Thread.sleep(1000)

// get the workbooks object
def workbooks = xls.Workbooks
// add a new workbook
def workbook  = workbooks.Add()

// select the active sheet
def sheet = workbook.ActiveSheet

cell = sheet.Range("A1")
cell.Value = "Operating System"
cell = sheet.Range("A2")
cell.Value = "Windows Server 2003"
cell = sheet.Range("A3")
cell.Value = "Windows XP"
cell = sheet.Range("A4")
cell.Value = "Windows NT 4.0"
cell = sheet.Range("A5")
cell.Value = "Other"

cell = sheet.Range("B1")
cell.Value = "Number of Computers"
cell = sheet.Range("B2")
cell.Value = 145
cell = sheet.Range("B3")
cell.Value = 987
cell = sheet.Range("B4")
cell.Value = 611
cell = sheet.Range("B5")
cell.Value = 41

def chart = workbook.Charts.Add(Scriptom.MISSING, sheet)  // create chart object
chart.ChartType = XlChartType.xl3DArea // set type to pie
chart.SetSourceData(sheet.Range("A1:B5"), XlRowCol.xlColumns) // set source data
chart.Location(XlChartLocation.xlLocationAsNewSheet) // add chart as new sheet
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That looks complicated for a beginner! Any suggestions as to where to start? –  blaughli Nov 8 '11 at 22:36
    
@blaughi, it is not too complicated. I translated your sample code above into Groovy. It mapped pretty direct. –  Mark Nov 9 '11 at 14:26
    
This is perfect, thank you very much. Reverse engineering this is helping me understand Groovy, and coding in general. The example on the page you linked seems incomplete. They use ActiveXProxy, not ActiveXObject, which I don't get. This is great. I would buy you coffee if you would add more comments to describe what's happening in each block of code (specifically aftter the last cell.Value definition. –  blaughli Nov 10 '11 at 18:15
    
@blaughi, I added some comments for you. I believe that the "ActiveXProxy" was for an older version of the scriptom library –  Mark Nov 10 '11 at 19:19
    
Thank you Mark, things are becoming clearer –  blaughli Nov 10 '11 at 19:43

Another option may be Apache POI, depending on what all you need to actually implement.

Either option will be complicated for a beginner; the easy path would be to use the shell.

share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean by "use the shell"? Oh you mean the MS shell? –  blaughli Nov 8 '11 at 22:57
    
@blaughli Yep. The COM approach might be easier than POI if you're on a Windows box, though. –  Dave Newton Nov 8 '11 at 23:01
    
Not sure you can use poi to do charts... –  tim_yates Nov 8 '11 at 23:24
    
@tim_yates I'm not either. No, you can't. –  Dave Newton Nov 8 '11 at 23:26

Mark's answer above was a great example. It's event easier to follow if you make a couple simple changes:

import org.codehaus.groovy.scriptom.*
import org.codehaus.groovy.scriptom.tlb.office.excel.*

def xls = new ActiveXObject("Excel.Application")

xls.Visible = true

Thread.sleep(1000)

// add a new workbook
def workbook  = xls.Workbooks.Add()

// select the active sheet
def sheet = workbook.ActiveSheet    

sheet.Range("A1").Value = "Operating System"
sheet.Range("A2").Value = "Windows Server 2003"
sheet.Range("A3").Value = "Windows XP"
sheet.Range("A4").Value = "Windows NT 4.0"
sheet.Range("A5").Value = "Other"

sheet.Range("B1").Value = "Number of Computers"
sheet.Range("B2").Value = 145
sheet.Range("B3").Value = 987
sheet.Range("B4").Value = 611
sheet.Range("B5").Value = 41

def chart = workbook.Charts.Add(Scriptom.MISSING, sheet)  // create chart object
chart.ChartType = XlChartType.xl3DArea // set type to pie
chart.SetSourceData(sheet.Range("A1:B5"), XlRowCol.xlColumns) // set source data
chart.Location(XlChartLocation.xlLocationAsNewSheet) // add chart as new sheet
share|improve this answer

I would also go for Apache POI. A working example can be found at the busy developer guide. There is also GSheets, a thin groovy wrapper for Apache POI, see the blog post and the unit test for an example usage.

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