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I have a javascript library that I would like to make freely available for non-commercial use. I would like to also sell licenses commercially. A GPLv3 dual-license like Sencha seems the way to go.

However, it appears that Apache License 2.0 does not allow GPLv3 projects to be included (but it is okay the other way around). Personally, I do not care, but I do appreciate the incompatibilities.

The question: Is there any way to allow an Apache Licensed project use of a GPLv3 library?

Possible options:

Is it possible to grant a "commercial" license to such project(s)?

Can the library be used as a pluggable separate module - i.e. not part of the project, but instructions on how to enable it so long as the source is not re-distributed?

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1 Answer 1

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Is there any way to allow an Apache Licensed project use of a GPLv3 library?

It appears not as indicated in http://www.apache.org/legal/resolved.html, though http://www.apache.org/legal/resolved.html#category-b indicates that weak copyleft libraries can be used within Apache licensed products in binary form. Since JavaScript isn't compiled though, I'm not quite sure how this would be cleanly implemented.

Is it possible to grant a "commercial" license to such project(s)?

You could offer the same bits under a different license by offering a dual-licensed library.

Update: Another option I came across recently is to dual-license your library under the GPL and MIT licenses, which are compatible. The MIT license allows for inclusion in proprietary works and is not a copyleft license.

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