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Is there a way to have a static class have static data that does not clear itself at the end of the function call? i.e. given:

static class Class1
{
    static int[] _array;
    static Class1()
    {
         _array = new[] {2};
    }
    public static void FillArray()
    {
        List<int> temp = new List<int>();
        for(int i=0;i<100;i++)
            temp.Add(i);
        _array = temp.ToArray();
    }
    public static int[] GetArray()
    {
        return _array;
    }
}

How can I get GetArray() to return something other than null?

EDIT: I want to call this code:

        int[] array1 = Class1.GetArray();
        for (int i = 0; i < array1.Length;i++ )
            Console.WriteLine(array1[i]);
        Class1.FillArray();
        for (int i = 0; i < array1.Length; i++)
            Console.WriteLine(array1[i]);

and not get two 2s. How can I make that happen?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
        int[] array1 = Class1.GetArray();
        for (int i = 0; i < array1.Length;i++ )
            Console.WriteLine(array1[i]);
        Class1.FillArray();
        for (int i = 0; i < array1.Length; i++)
            Console.WriteLine(array1[i]);

In this code, you are getting the memory address of the first int[] {2} array and storing that as array1. Then when you call FillArray() you are creating the new List of arrays, and only setting its memory back to the _array in the class, not array1. That is not a reference to the memory in the class, but to the actual original array. So then, when you loop back through, you are still looking at the same memory block.

You should probably be doing this instead:

    int[] array1 = Class1.GetArray();
    for (int i = 0; i < array1.Length;i++ )
        Console.WriteLine(array1[i]);
    Class1.FillArray();
    array1 = Class1.GetArray();
    for (int i = 0; i < array1.Length; i++)
        Console.WriteLine(array1[i]);

Update if you change your Class1 to look like this, you will see that you are changing the data in the class.

   static class Class1
   {
      static int[] _array;
      static Class1()
      {
         _array = new[] { 2 };
      }

      public static void FillArray()
      {
         List<int> temp = new List<int>();
         for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
         {
            temp.Add(i);

         }
         _array = temp.ToArray();
         PrintArray();
      }

      public static int[] GetArray()
      {
         PrintArray();
         return _array;
      }

      private static void PrintArray()
      {
         foreach (int i in _array)
         {
            System.Console.Write(String.Format("{0},", i));
         }
      }

   }

Because it will print out the elements in the array after each call.

share|improve this answer
    
But I want the data in the static class to be modified... I know I can change the data in my current class. –  soandos Nov 9 '11 at 0:06
    
You are modifying the data in the class. Class1._array is getting changed after the FillArray function. But why your code is printing out 2 twice is because you are looping through array1 not Class1._array. –  Wizetux Nov 9 '11 at 0:19

use a static constructor...

static class Class1
{
    private static readonly  int[] _array;
    static Class1()
    {
        List<int> temp = new List<int>();
        for(int i=0;i<100;i++)
            temp.Add(i);
        _array = temp.ToArray();
    }

    public static int[] GetArray()
    {
        return _array;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Lets say I want to change the data there, but have all my changes be "saved" something like fill it with the first hundred numbers, then replace that will the first 200 numbers. How can I do that? –  soandos Nov 8 '11 at 23:10
    
@soandos: just remove readonly, then you can modify _array where you want. –  Arnaud F. Nov 8 '11 at 23:13
    
But won't it get cleaned up then? –  soandos Nov 8 '11 at 23:14
    
@soandos: What do you mean by "cleaned up"? What are you trying to achieve? –  Arnaud F. Nov 8 '11 at 23:16
    
If it is not read-only, then when I call GetArray, it will have been reset to null... or so I thought. –  soandos Nov 8 '11 at 23:16

you can write something like

private static readonly int[] array = FillArray();
share|improve this answer
    
But lets say I want to change that static data... –  soandos Nov 8 '11 at 23:12
    
so remove the readonly keyword, you will be able to modify it when you want, and its hoing to be cleaned up when your static clqss will be destroyed, hence when your application will be closed –  Mike Nov 8 '11 at 23:17
    
Not the case... It is a static class in another project. It seems to get cleaned up between every time I access it... –  soandos Nov 8 '11 at 23:21

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