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I have a bit of confusion about retain and release variable.

These are my question:

  1. I have an object A allocated
    Object *A = [[Object alloc] init]

    Does this increase the retain count? Is it the same as having
    Object *A = [[[Object alloc] init] retain].
    I know if we call retain, the object will be held until we released it.

  2.  
    2.1. I have a retained Object A. This Object A was passed to a function as an argument. Later in the function I released it. Will it release the memory of the Object A? if it is, does the Object A no longer existed.

    2.2 Follow on with 2.1, instead of releasing Object A. I created a local variable Object *B = A. If I released Object B will it also release Object A. Or if I retain B, will it retain A as well.

I am a bit of confused so I want to ask anyone here to directing me to the right path.

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Object *A = [[Object alloc] init] Does this increase the retain count?

Yes, more specifically, likely, it initializes the retain count to 1.

Is it the same as having Object *A = [[[Object alloc] init] retain]. I know if we call retain, the object will be held until we released it.

Not the same. That will increase the retain count twice. There's not much reason to increase the retain count twice in the same place. If you did do that, you'd be responsible for calling release twice.

I have a retained object A. This Object A was passed to a function as an argument. Later in the function I released it. Will it release the memory of the Object A? if it is, does the object A no longer existed.

First, you should make sure that you understand that whether release frees memory or not depends on if there are other owners that are holding a reference to the object. If more than one thing has retained the object, then release will not free the memory in that case.

Second, bad idea. To keep sanity with reference counting, you should follow certain patterns.

  1. retain (or alloc) instance variables, release them in dealloc or before.
  2. retain (or alloc) local variables if needed, and release them before you exit the method.
  3. The caller does not own the return value of a function. That implies that you handle a function return value like a local variable, but autorelease it before you return it instead of releasing it. That ensures it will last at least long enough for the caller to retain it, if needed.

One of the patterns is not for a method caller to own a reference to a method argument, but when the function returns the caller does not own the reference. The method should not release the caller's reference.

Follow on with 2.1, instead of releasing Object A. I created a local variable Object *B = ObjectA. If I released B will it also release Object A. Or if I retain B, will it retain A as well.

retain and release are sent to objects, not references. A and B refer to the same object, so it's the same calling retain or release on one as on the other.

It is legitimate, but probably unnecessary, to [B retain] and later in the same method [B release]. But do not do [B release] only, thereby expropriating A's ownership of the object.

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If i have a local variable in a function, and the function got executed, will the local variable be destroyed or just remain in memory... –  Simon Nov 9 '11 at 2:59
    
The variable will go away, but if it is a pointer, what it points to won't automatically go away. –  morningstar Nov 9 '11 at 4:45

Remember this: NARC.

New, Alloc, Retain, Copy are the 4 commands that will increase the retain count. In other words, for every NARC, you need a corresponding release to release that memory.

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Calling alloc (or new) increases the retain count. If you retain again after that, that increases it once again. There is no need to do that second retain except for specific wanted cases.

The main rule is : the one that alloc is the one that release. Of course you can bypass that if you reaaly know what you are doing.

I have a retained object A. This Object A was passed to a function as an argument. Later in the function I released it. Will it release the memory of the Object A?

Basically, Yes.

if it is, does the object A no longer existed.

Yes again, but sometimes, it remains "in memory" so calls to it may work for a very very short time. Very short.

Follow on with 2.1, instead of releasing Object A. I created a local variable Object *B = ObjectA. If I released B will it also release Object A. Or if I retain B, will it retain A as well.

if you retain B, then the object references by A is retained twice. so releasing B does not free the object referenced by A. But if you don't retain B, then releasing B equals to releasing A (only one retain count).

Tip

Imagine that any reference you declare (Balloon* rope) is a rope you get in your hand to retain a Balloon object that contain things. The rope is not the object. The object (the balloon) is created somewhere in memory (here in the space). If you retain a second time, you get another rope to that balloon and get it in the other hand. To free the balloon, you need to free both ropes.

Note that alloc (or new) creates a rope so the balloon you've just created does not go immediatly in outerspace.

Is that clear ?

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2  
-init doesn’t increase the retain count. +alloc, on the other hand, does. –  Bavarious Nov 8 '11 at 23:47
    
@Bavarious:thank you for the correction, I had writen to quick :-) –  Oliver Nov 8 '11 at 23:55

1) init is not the same as retain.

The init method actually puts the object in a correct "initialization" state so that the object can be used by calling the parent classes init method, as well as setting up any additional setup that is placed in the init method implemented in the objects .m file. The retain actually just increments the retain count by 1.

2) 2.1) When you allocate memory for an object, you want to release it in the same scope per say, so when you pass in an object into a method you wouldn't release it there. However, if you did release it in the function/method where it was passed in since you are passing in an object reference, it will be released. You can't be entirely sure when the object itself will cease to exist though.

2.2) When you say Object *B = ObjectA you aren't actually creating another object, but are creating a new reference or pointer to ObjectA. If you call release/retain on the reference B, since it's pointing to the same object as ObjectA, it's the same thing as calling release/retain on ObjectA.

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