Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How would I write this query using joins? I have tried to do it but it doesn't work.

select fund.fundname, sum(shares) as tt, (sum(shares)*price.price) as value 
from trans, fund, customer, price 
where trans.fundid = fund.fundid 
and trans.transdate = '2009-1-1' 
and price.fundid = trans.fundid 
and price.pricedate = trans.transdate 
and trans.sin = customer.sin 
and customer.name = 'Jacob' 
group by fund.fundname, price.price;

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
That are joins, three of them even. Probably even cross joins. What have you tried and why didnt it work? Error messages? –  stefan Nov 8 '11 at 23:58

4 Answers 4

I suppose you're talking about explicit joins. As you have it, the joins are simply implicit. You'd do it like this:

SELECT fund.fundname, sum(shares) as tt, (sum(shares)*price.price) as value 
FROM trans
JOIN fund
 ON ( trans.fundid = fund.fundid )
JOIN customer
 ON ( trans.sin = customer.sin )
JOIN price 
 ON ( price.fundid = trans.fundid )
WHERE trans.transdate = '2009-1-1' 
 AND price.pricedate = trans.transdate 
 AND customer.name = 'Jacob' 
GROUP BY fund.fundname, price.price;

Postgresql also allows a nifty shorthand with USING which will only include one copy of the column in the end result set:

SELECT fundname, sum(shares) as tt, (sum(shares)*price.price) as value 
FROM trans
JOIN fund
 USING ( fundid )
JOIN customer
 USING ( sin )
JOIN price 
 USING ( fundid )
WHERE trans.transdate = '2009-1-1' 
 AND price.pricedate = trans.transdate 
 AND customer.name = 'Jacob' 
GROUP BY fund.fundname, price.price;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks.. I was trying to do natural joins on it. Is there a difference between regular join and natural join? My syntax was wrong I believe... –  night mare Nov 9 '11 at 0:00
2  
NATURAL JOINS will join on every like-named column. –  Evan Carroll Nov 9 '11 at 0:03
1  
There's nothing natural about natural joins. –  stefan Nov 9 '11 at 0:16

You just have to separate the join conditions and the filter conditions :

SELECT fund.fundname, SUM(shares) AS tt, SUM(shares) * price.price AS value
FROM trans
INNER JOIN fund
    USING (fundid)
INNER JOIN price
    ON price.fundid = trans.fundid
   AND price.pricedate = trans.transdate
INNER JOIN customer
    USING (sin)
WHERE transdate = '2009-1-1'
  AND customer.name = 'Jacob'
GROUP BY fund.fundname, price.price

Note that USING will "merge" the two columns, so you don't have to use aliases.

share|improve this answer
 select fund.fundname, sum(shares) as tt, (sum(shares)*price.price) as value 
 from trans 
 join fund on fund.fundid=trans.fundid 
 join customer on customer.sin=trans.sin 
 join price on price.pricedate=trans.transdate
 where  
 trans.transdate = '2009-1-1' 
 and customer.name = 'Jacob' 
 group by fund.fundname, price.price;
share|improve this answer

One more:

SELECT f.fundname
      ,sum(shares) AS tt
      ,(sum(shares) * p.price) AS value 
FROM   trans t
JOIN   fund f USING (fundid)
JOIN   price p ON (p.fundid, p.pricedate) = (t.fundid, t.transdate)
JOIN   customer c USING (sin)
WHERE  t.transdate = '2009-1-1' 
AND    c.name = 'Jacob' 
GROUP  BY 1, p.price;

I used some syntactical simplifications:

  • USING if left and right feature the same name. Carefull, if the name pops up multiple times, then the order of the JOINS make a difference or it may become ambiguous. Example here: sin. If there is a fund.sin as well, you have to use explicit JOIN ON instead.

  • (p.fundid, p.pricedate) = (t.fundid, t.transdate) is short for
    (p.fundid = t.fundid AND p.pricedate = t.transdate)

  • GROUP BY 1 ist short for
    GROUP BY <fist column in the select list>

More about joins in the fine manual here.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.