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In designing a solution, sometimes it may be convenient to provide wrapper classes for primitive data types. Consider a class that represents a numeric value, be it a double, a float, or an int.

class Number {
private:
    double val;

public:
    Number(int n) : val(n) { }
    Number(float n) : val(n) { }
    Number(double n) : val(n) { }

    // Assume copy constructors and assignment operators exist

    Number& add(const Number& other) {
        val += other.val;
        return *this;
    }

    int to_int() const { return (int) val; }
    float to_float() const { return (float) val; }
    double to_double() const { return val; }
};

Now suppose that I have a function as such:

void advanced_increment(Number& n) {
    n.add(1);
}

And I would use this function as such:

Number n(2);
advanced_increment(n); // n = 3

This sounds easy enough. But what if the function was like this?

void primitive_increment(int& n) {
    ++n;
}

Note that the increment is an example. It is assumed that the function would perform more complicated operations on primitive data types that they should also be able to perform on Number types without any issues.

How would I use the function exactly as before? As in:

Number n(2);
primitive_increment(n);

How could I make my Number class compatible with primitive_increment? How could I create a wrapper class for primitive data types that would be compatible anywhere that these data types are required?

So far, I have only found two solution. One is to create a function such as double& Number::get_value() and then use it like primitive_increment(n.get_value());. The second solution is to create implicit conversion methods such as Number::operator int&(); but these can result in many ambiguous calls and would make the code confusing.

I'm wondering if there is any other solution to implement these types of wrappers and retain their primitive functionality.

Update:

To further clarify, in the actual project, the intent here is to make all data types derived from one base class that is commonly referred to as Object when designing such solution. A constraint is that no outside library should be used. Therefore, if I have a container that has pointers to the type Object, it should be able to hold any arbitrary value, primitive or not, and perform any primitive operation that is allowed on Object. I hope this explains it better.

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2  
What's wrong with using primitive data types directly? –  Pubby Nov 9 '11 at 0:15
    
@Pubby, Nothing, but the design dictates this approach for greater functionality and encapsulating primitive data types under complex classes. –  Zeenobit Nov 9 '11 at 0:17
    
Take a look at Boost Operators. That comes handy in cases like this. –  user405725 Nov 9 '11 at 0:26
2  
@teedayf: I think you need a better example, then! Everyone's getting hung up on the issue of handling conversions between primitive types. Are you really just after (for example) an Int class that can be used anywhere an int can? –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 9 '11 at 1:10
2  
@teedayf: I have a very strong suspicion that you'd be much better off providing separate specializations or overloads for the primitives rather than attempting to shoehorn them into some virtual polymorphic hierarchy. Someone thought that was a good idea in 1995, and all we got out of that was Java. –  Kerrek SB Nov 9 '11 at 1:36

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

C++11 has explicit operator overloads.

struct silly_wrapper {
  int foo;
  explicit operator int&() { return foo; }
};

void primitive_increment(int& x) { ++x; }


int main()
{
   silly_wrapper x;
   primitive_increment(x); // works
   x += 1; // doesn't work - can't implicitly cast
}
share|improve this answer
    
More complicated than it looks since he wants foo and bar to be equal. –  Mooing Duck Nov 9 '11 at 0:50
    
@MooingDuck Complicated? I'll remove bar - I'm showing how to make explicit cast overloads, not how to create unions. –  Pubby Nov 9 '11 at 0:56
    
oh, I missed the word explicit. That changes things. If that opening text was there too, I missed that as well. –  Mooing Duck Nov 9 '11 at 1:46

Instead of providing it to primitive_increment. You should overload the ++ operator for your Number class and increment it that way.

Number& operator++() { ++val; return *this;}
Number& operator+=(const Number& rhs) { val += rhs.Val; return *this;}
Number operator+(const Number& rhs) { Number t(*this); t+=rhs; return t;}

see: Operators in C and C++

share|improve this answer
    
The increment function is simply an example though. It is assumed that other complicated functions would be performed by those functions. –  Zeenobit Nov 9 '11 at 0:13
    
Indeed. Although the convention is to define operator+ in terms of operator+=. –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 9 '11 at 0:17
    
@teedayf: I think the OP wanted to know if it was possible to overload operators. –  Mooing Duck Nov 9 '11 at 0:17
    
@MooingDuck, I'm perfectly aware that I could overload all valid operators for the wrapper class (I actually would be doing that regardless). But that doesn't address the question, because I still wouldn't be able to directly pass the Number object to primitive_increment seamlessly. –  Zeenobit Nov 9 '11 at 0:20
    
@teedayf: Didn't realize the intent was to pass it to a function taking an int –  Mooing Duck Nov 9 '11 at 0:21
class Number {
    enum ValType {DoubleType, IntType} CurType;
    union {
        double DoubleVal;
        int IntVal;
    };
public:
    Number(int n) : IntVal(n), CurType(int) { }
    Number(float n) : DoubleVal(n), CurType(DoubleType) { }
    Number(double n) : DoubleVal(n), CurType(DoubleType) { }

   // Assume copy constructors and assignment operators exist

    Number& add(const Number& other) {
        switch(CurType) {
        case DoubleType: DoubleVal += other.to_double(); break;
        case IntType: IntVal+= other.to_int(); break;
        }
        return *this;
    }

    int& to_int() { 
        switch(CurType) {
        case DoubleType: IntVal = DoubleVal; CurType = IntType; break;
        //case IntType: DoubleVal = IntVal; CurType = DoubleType; break;
        }
        return IntVal; 
    }
    const int to_int() const { 
        switch(CurType) {
        case DoubleType: return (int)DoubleVal;
        case IntType: return (int)IntVal;
        }
    }
    const float to_float() const { 
        switch(CurType) {
        case DoubleType: return (float)DoubleVal;
        case IntType: return (float)IntVal;
        }
    }

    double& to_double() { 
        switch(CurType) {
        //case DoubleType: IntVal = DoubleVal; CurType = IntType; break;
        case IntType: DoubleVal = IntVal; CurType = DoubleType; break;
        }
        return DoubleVal; 
    }
    const double to_double() const { 
        switch(CurType) {
        case DoubleType: return (double)DoubleVal;
        case IntType: return (double)IntVal;
        }
    }
};

void primitive_increment(int& n) {
    ++n;
}

int main() {
    Number pi(3.1415);
    primitive_increment(pi.to_int());
    //pi now is 4
    return 0;
}

I will admit this is quite awkward, and not the ideal situation, but it solves the given problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that's ugly, and has awkward semantics. –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 9 '11 at 0:34
    
Very. I think the real answer is to template the function. –  Mooing Duck Nov 9 '11 at 0:35

If your Number class does not implement a subset of int, you just cannot do that. It would give wrong results if e.g. your Number class contains the value INT_MAX and can hold the value INT_MAX+1 as well. If your Number class models a subset of int, then conversion to int and back is of course an option.

Other than that, your only chance is to rewrite the function to accept Number objects. Ideally make it a template, so that it can work both with int and with Number (as well as with any other current or future class which presents an int-like interface).

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Make the conversion operator private and have a friend function do the conversion inside of it.

class silly_wrapper {
private:
  int foo;
  float bar;
  operator int&() { return foo; }

  template <typename T>
  friend void primitive_increment(T& x) { ++static_cast<int&>(x); }
};


int main()
{
   silly_wrapper x;
   primitive_increment(x); // works

   int i;
   primitive_increment(i); // works

   int& r = static_cast<int&>(x); // can't convert - operator is private
}
share|improve this answer
    
The point is that the wrapper class needs to be passed to an arbitrary set of functions. –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 9 '11 at 0:41

Here's an even more bizzare answer I just thought of:

class Number; 
template<class par, class base>
class NumberProxy {
    base Val;
    par* parent;
    NumberProxy(par* p, base v) :parent(p), Val(v) {}
    NumberProxy(const NumberProxy& rhs) :parent(rhs.parent), Val(rhs.Val) {}
    ~NumberProxy() { *parent = Val; }
    NumberProxy& operator=(const NumberProxy& rhs) {Val = rhs.Val; return *this}
    operator base& {return Val;}
};

class Number {
private:
    double val;
public:
    Number(int n) : val(n) { }
    Number(float n) : val(n) { }
    Number(double n) : val(n) { }
    // Assume copy constructors and assignment operators exist        
    int to_int() const { return (int) val; }
    float to_float() const { return (float) val; }
    double to_double() const { return val; }

    NumberProxy<Number,int> to_int() { return NumberProxy<Number,int>(this,val); }
    NumberProxy<Number,float> to_float() { return NumberProxy<Number,float>(this,val); }
    NumberProxy<Number,double> to_double() { return NumberProxy<Number,double>(this,val); }
};

void primitive_increment(int& n) {
    ++n;
}

int main() {
    Number pi(3.1415);
    primitive_increment(pi.to_int());
    //pi now is 4
    return 0;
}

Number.to_int() returns a NumberProxy<int>, which is implicity convertable to an int&, which the function operates on. When the function and expression complete, the temporary NumberProxy<int> is destroyed, and it's destructor updates it's parent Number with the updated value. This has the added convenience of only requiring minor modification to the Number class.

Obviously theres's some danger here, if you call to_N() twice in the same statement, the two int&'s wont be in sync, or if someone takes a int& past the end of the statement.

share|improve this answer
    
That too would have dangerous semantics. Consider Number x(3); int &r = x.to_int(); r = 4;. –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 9 '11 at 0:50
    
I forgot to mention that in the answer. Edited. –  Mooing Duck Nov 9 '11 at 0:55

(This is a bit of a shot in the dark, as I'm not entirely sure how your overall design fits together.)

How about templated free functions:

class IncTagIntegral{};
class IncTagNonintegral{};
template <bool> struct IncTag { typedef IncTagNonintegral type; }
template <> struct IncTag<true> { typedef IncTagIntegral type; }

template <typename T> void inc_impl(T & x, IncTagIntegral)
{
  ++x;
}

template <typename T> void inc_impl(T & x, IncTagNonintegral)
{
  x += T(1);
}


template <typename T> void primitive_increment(T & x)
{
  inc_impl<T>(x, typename IncTag<std::is_integral<T>::value>::type());
}

template <> void primitive_increment(Number & x)
{
  // whatever
}

This approach may be generalizable to other functions that you need to apply both to existing types and to your own types.


Here's another long shot, this time using type erasure:

struct TEBase
{
   virtual void inc() = 0;
}

struct any
{
  template <typename T> any(const T &);
  void inc() { impl->inc(); }
private:
  TEBase * impl;
};

template <typename T> struct TEImpl : public TEBase
{
  virtual void inc() { /* implement */ }
  // ...
}; // and provide specializations!

template <typename T> any::any<T>(const T & t) : impl(new TEImpl<T>(t)) { }

The key is that you provide different concrete implementations of TEImpl<T>::inc() by means of specialization, but you can use a.inc() for any object a of type any. You can build additional free-function wrappers on this idea, like void inc(any & a) { a.inc(); }.

share|improve this answer
    
His goal seems to be to pass his Number class to arbitrary functions expecting an int –  Mooing Duck Nov 9 '11 at 0:47
    
@MooingDuck: Quite possibly. I can't say I'm entirely on board with this project. The OP is welcome to elaborate and perhaps provide a more illustrative example. –  Kerrek SB Nov 9 '11 at 0:50
    
@KerrekSB, In the actual project, the intent here is to make all data types derived from one base class that is commonly referred to as Object when designing such solution. A constraint is that no outside library should be used. Therefore, if I have a container that has pointers to the type Object, it should be able to hold any arbitrary value, primitive or not, and perform any primitive operation that is allowed on Object. I hope this explains it better. –  Zeenobit Nov 9 '11 at 0:57
    
@teedayf: Hmm... that sort of explains one aspect of what you're trying to do (though not why that would be a good idea), but not how that connects to operators and functions. Do you somehow want all functions to work magically on everything derived from your super object? –  Kerrek SB Nov 9 '11 at 1:08
    
@KerrekSB: Not magically, but to an extent, yes. I want this to be invisible to the user. –  Zeenobit Nov 9 '11 at 1:12

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