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I have this code with the switch statement which I got from the post , which works absolutely fine:

String getOrdinal(final int day) {
    if (day >= 11 && day <= 13) {
        return "th";
    }
    switch (day % 10) {
        case 1: return "st";
        case 2: return "nd";
        case 3: return "rd";
        default: return "th";
    }
}

but if I change it to something like this, it breaks, as all the cases besides case 1 gets executed :

  static String getOrdinal(final int day) {
    StringBuilder ordinalBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    ordinalBuilder.append("<sup>");
    if (day >= 11 && day <= 13) {
        ordinalBuilder.append("th") ;
    }
    switch (day % 10) {
        case 1: ordinalBuilder.append("st");
        case 2: ordinalBuilder.append("nd");
        case 3: ordinalBuilder.append("rd");
        default: ordinalBuilder.append("th");
    }
    ordinalBuilder.append("</sup>");
   return ordinalBuilder.toString();
 }

this prints 2<sup>ndrdth</sup> when I pass in '2', i tried changing the builder to buffer but same response.. could this be a bug or am I making some mistake?

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3  
Nothing is gained by inlining the switch statement, you should have just kept the getOrdinal method separate and had your code call it. Try passing 11, 12, or 13 to your code. There is another bug you created. –  Tim Bender Nov 9 '11 at 0:44
1  
I wish I could give more +1s to @TimBender. This question is the very definition of cargo cult programming. –  CanSpice Nov 9 '11 at 0:56
    
R T F M . . . . . –  dokaspar Aug 28 '12 at 13:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

It's a bug in your code. You forgot to put in a break after each case:

switch (day % 10) {
    case 1: ordinalBuilder.append("st"); break;
    case 2: ordinalBuilder.append("nd"); break;
    case 3: ordinalBuilder.append("rd"); break;
    default: ordinalBuilder.append("th");
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I don't see any bug here, at least not in the way the language is working. The behavior of a switch statement, by design, is that it will start executing statements at the case label which matches the argument, and then continue until the end of the block. So

switch (x) {
    case 1:
        // do thing 1
    case 2:
        // do thing 2
    case 3:
        // do thing 3
    default:
        // do nothing
}

will do both things 2 and 3 if x is 2, and will do things 1, 2, and 3 if x is 1.

To get the behavior you're probably looking for, end each case with a break:

switch (x) {
    case 1:
        // do thing 1
        break;
    case 2:
        // do thing 2
        break;
    case 3:
        // do thing 3
        break;
    default:
        // do nothing
        break;
}

(strictly speaking the break at the very end is unnecessary, but I often put it in out of habit).

The reason you didn't have this problem in the first code example is that return is like a super-break: it has the same effect as break, namely ending execution within the switch block, but it also ends execution of the whole method.

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you need to add a 'break' statement in every switch case. It was worked previously because you made a return from method...

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A "break;" statement separates the cases from one another so in order to execute the statements in a specific case just break the case as soon as it comes to an end.

If you don't use break the compiler thinks that it can continue execution of all the cases up to the end of the program.

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The first version returns before continuing on in the case statement. The second version needs a break; statement to get the same behavior.

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