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The following code has a new callstack when the debugger fires in d (jsfiddle here)

function c() {
    setTimeout( d, 1000 );
}

function d() {
    debugger;   
}

c();

If we modify the code to use setTimeout( d(), 1000 ); which has brackets (parenthesis:)

function c() {
    setTimeout( d(), 1000 );
}

function d() {
    debugger;   
}

c();

then the callstack has both c() and d() (jsfiddle here). Why?

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1  
d evaluates to a function-object. Using the function-application operator, (), on the function-object (which resulted from the evaluation of d) invokes it immediately and evaluates to the result of said function (undefined in this case), which is then passed as an argument to setTimeout. That is, it is equivalent to: var r = d(); setTimeout(r, 1000); or, in this case, d(); setTimeout(undefined, 1000). –  user166390 Nov 9 '11 at 0:49
    
    
@outis I don't think it is a duplicate, very similar once you have the knowledge but this one relates to the callstack generated, the others do not. –  Aran Mulholland Nov 10 '11 at 1:13
    
@Aran: It's exactly the same question, though stated differently. An immediate function call is the same as a frame being pushed on the call-stack while another is still active. The mention of call-stacks merely couches the question in terms of a particular computational model. If anything, this is a more limited statement of the question. –  outis Nov 10 '11 at 4:21
    
@outis i still think it is a valid question, and having a question asked in more than one way just expands the possibility of a greater understanding of the problem space. i was looking for a way to start a new callstack, i ended up understanding setTimeout better. once you know the answer you could see it as a duplicate, before then it is totally different and relates to a different problem. –  Aran Mulholland Nov 10 '11 at 5:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are not passing setTimeout the function d in the second example; you are instead passing d(), which is the result of calling d.

The result of calling d is undefined since it returns nothing, which converts to the string "undefined", which is then evaled, doing... precisely nothing.


With regard to callstacks, since you are calling d inside of c, that is why you see c in the callstack. To clarify, your second example is the same as

function c() {
    var temp = d();
    setTimeout(temp, 1000);
}

function d() {
    debugger;   
}

c();
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SetTimeout takes a function argument. If you pass a string, it acts like eval. If you invoke the function, like you did, it fires immediately then setTimeout fires with the results in a new call stack.

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Because in the first example you are passing a function pointer as the thing to execute in 1 second. In the second example you have already executed d, and you are passing the results of d() to setTimeout to call in 1 second.

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