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I have a template class which defines operators, that works on the template parameters. I have another class that inherits from this class, and I want the operators to be inherited of course.

Consider this:

template <typename T>
class A
{
public:
  A(const T& x) : x_(x) {}
  A operator-(const A& other) 
  { 
    A r(*this);
    r.x_ -= other.x_;
    return r;
  }

  T x() const { return x_; }

private:
  T x_;
};

template <typename T>
class B : public A<T>
{
  // additional stuff here
};

I cannot seem to use any of the operators declared in A for the objects of type B.

Example:

int main()
{
  // Fine
  A<int> a(5);
  A<int> b(2);
  A<int> c = a - b;
  std::cout << c.x() << std::endl;

  // Won't compile :( 
  B<int> d(5);
  B<int> e(2);
  B<int> f = d - e;
  std::cout << f.x() << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

Will trigger the following error: error: conversion from ‘A’ to non-scalar type ‘B’ requested

Is there any way this can work? I really want to avoid re-writing all the code (which would be exactly the same) in class B.

Thanks !

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The issue is not with calling the operator, but constructing a B from the return value which is an A.

If B does not contain any data other than in its base class A, you can provide a constructor for a B from an A:

template <typename T>
class B : public A<T>
{
public:
     B(const T& x) : A<T>(x) {}
     B(const A<T>&x) : A<T>(x) {}
  // additional stuff here
};

If B does contain its own data, then surely you need to implement the operator- to handle those data fields?

share|improve this answer
    
In my case it is a Point class, therefore the A class has x,y coordinates and the B class contains flags (uint32). I think your solution would work here. I cannot get your solution to compile though. – zedxz Nov 9 '11 at 2:35
1  
@zedxz. Apologies. Now refers to A<T>&, rather than A; likely that was the compile problem. – Keith Nov 9 '11 at 5:03

When I try this, visual studio gives me the error cannot convert from 'A<T>' to 'B<T>'

So I tried changing the type of the variable f from B<int> to A<int> and it compiled properly. Here's what I have:

int main()
{
  // Fine
  A<int> a(5);
  A<int> b(2);
  A<int> c = a - b;
  std::cout << c.x() << std::endl;

  // does compile :)
  B<int> d(5);
  B<int> e(2);
  A<int> f = d - e;
  std::cout << f.x() << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

However, I don't think this is what you want, because if you found a way to cast f from B to A you would find that all of the data members specific to B had been erased. If you think about what the processor is doing under the hood, this makes sense. When it sees that the return type of operator- is A, it returns exactly sizeof(A) bytes of data. Any extra data on top of that (such as the data associated with B) is chopped off. So to be safe the compiler tells you that you're out of luck if you try to put the return value into a variable of type B.

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