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The code below shows a rectangle class using double points, which are also stored in an object. The rectangle and the points in the rectangle are immutable because they do not need to change. I would like to provide the ability to copy (make new point objects) or make a reference to the points provided in the constructor, but the only way I could think of doing this is to add a boolean parameter specifying if the caller wants to make a copy or reference.

This is for extensibility, although it may not be of prime importance, I would like this option. However, I don't like the way it's implemented with the boolean parameter. Is there a way I can make two constructors taking the same parameters, one to make a reference and one to make copies? or is there an equivalent to C++ parameter auto definition in the prototype so it doesn't need to be specified by the caller? I have thought about using varargs, but then the caller could send unlimited parameters as garbage, possibly causing a stack overflow, I think...

/**
 * An immutable, double-precision floating-point (64-bit doubles x4) rectangle.
 * The rectangle can be made to reference existing points, or to create new points. Since the points
 * are also immutable, this is acceptable, as it is guaranteed they cannot change.
 * @author Bill
 */
public class DoubleRect {
    public final DoublePoint topLeft;
    public final DoublePoint bottomRight;

    public DoubleRect(DoublePoint setTopLeft, DoublePoint setBottomRight, boolean makeCopies) {
        if(makeCopies == true) {        
            topLeft = new DoublePoint(setTopLeft);
            bottomRight = new DoublePoint(setBottomRight);
        }
        else {
            topLeft = setTopLeft;
            bottomRight = setBottomRight;
        }
    }


}

UPDATE: Thanks to all that helped me figure out what to do instead. This is how I recoded it.

/**
 * An immutable, double-precision floating-point (64-bit) rectangle.
 * The rectangle can be made to reference existing points, or to create new points. Since the points
 * are also immutable, referencing the points is acceptable, as it is guaranteed they cannot change.
 * @author Bill
 */
public class DoubleRect {
    public final DoublePoint topLeft;
    public final DoublePoint bottomRight;

    /**
     * This constructor will reference the passed objects rather than duplicating them.
     * See the static factory method createWithClonedPoints() for making internal copies of the point objects
     * @param setTopLeft Double point designating the top left coordinate
     * @param setBottomRight Double point designating the bottom right coordinate
     */
    public DoubleRect(DoublePoint setTopLeft, DoublePoint setBottomRight) {
        topLeft = setTopLeft;
        bottomRight = setBottomRight;
    }

    /**
     * This constructor will create new immutable points within this object using the coordinates specified
     */
    public DoubleRect(double top, double left, double right, double bottom) {
        topLeft = new DoublePoint(left, top);
        bottomRight = new DoublePoint(right, bottom);
    }

    public static DoubleRect createWithClonedPoints(DoublePoint topLeft, DoublePoint bottomRight) {
        return new DoubleRect(topLeft.x, topLeft.y, bottomRight.x, bottomRight.y);
    }


}
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If they are immutable then why make copies? –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 9 '11 at 3:21
    
not sure yet... it is for use in a multi-thread app, and possibly may want to use it in multi-process later. I'm fairly new to Java, and I'm used to pointers. –  William the Coderer Nov 9 '11 at 3:23
    
Use a static factory method. –  Dave Newton Nov 9 '11 at 3:29
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is there a way I can make two constructors taking the same parameters, one to make a reference and one to make copies?

In such a case, it is advised to have multiple static-factory-methods instead of constructors.

share|improve this answer
    
Good idea. Thanks :) –  William the Coderer Nov 9 '11 at 3:28
    
@WilliamtheCoderer: You are welcome. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 9 '11 at 3:34
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Is there a way I can make two constructors taking the same parameters ...

No. In Java, each constructor must have a different signature.

... or is there an equivalent to C++ parameter auto definition in the prototype so it doesn't need to be specified by the caller?

No there is no direct equivalent. You could however to this:

public DoubleRect(DoublePoint topLeft, DoublePoint bottomRight,
         boolean makeCopies) {
    ...
}

public DoubleRect(DoublePoint topLeft, DoublePoint bottomRight) {
    this(topLeft, bottomRight, false);
}

In your use-case it works quite nicely, in use-cases where you have lots of optional arguments, this approach becomes unwieldy and/or unworkable.


However, I agree that factory methods or factory objects could be a better solution.

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why not use polymorphism strategy you could do it like this:

public class DoubleRect {
    public final DoublePoint topLeft;
    public final DoublePoint bottomRight;

    public DoubleRect() {
       topLeft = new DoublePoint();
       bottomRight = new DoublePoint();
    }

public DoubleRect(DoublePoint setTopLeft, DoublePoint setBottomRight)
{
   topLeft = setTopLeft;
   bottomRight = setBottomRight;
}


}

This type of declaration for your constructor is valid on java.

share|improve this answer
    
the points must be set in the constructor, and in the first constructor there are none specified; and they can't be changed later. Also, it cannot take the same parameters as the other, as they would have the same qualifying name and parameter list. –  William the Coderer Nov 9 '11 at 3:30
    
well I guess the other way around is to do the encapsulation create setter and getter for each properties in that way it will be even more flexible and reusable then –  Christopher Pelayo Nov 9 '11 at 3:31
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