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I was tasked to create code that would fetch data from database using data reader and I'm curious of what is going to be the best practice between the 3 methods that I could use below to convert data from my data reader which by default fetched with a type of object.

    internal static RoomType SelectRoomType(int roomTypeID)
    {
        SqlCommand commRoomTypeSelector = ConnectionManager.MainConnection.CreateCommand();
        commRoomTypeSelector.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
        commRoomTypeSelector.CommandText = "Rooms.asp_RMS_RoomType_Select";
        commRoomTypeSelector.Parameters.AddWithValue("RoomTypeID", roomTypeID);

        SqlDataReader dreadRoomType = commRoomTypeSelector.ExecuteReader();
        if (dreadRoomType.FieldCount != 0)
        {
            dreadRoomType.Read();
            RoomType roomType = new RoomType();
            roomType.RoomTypeID = (int)dreadRoomType["RoomTypeID"];
            roomType.RoomTypeName = (string)dreadRoomType["RoomType"];
            roomType.IsActive = ((string)dreadRoomType["IsActive"]).ToUpper() == "Y";
            roomType.LastEditDate = (string)dreadRoomType["LastEditDate"] != string.Empty ? DateTime.Parse((string)dreadRoomType["LastEditDate"]) : DateTime.MinValue;
            roomType.LastEditUser = (string)dreadRoomType["LastEditUser"];
            dreadRoomType.Close();
            return roomType;
        }
        dreadRoomType.Close();
        return null;
    }

What confuses me here is the unboxing part, According to http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yz2be5wk.aspx Boxing and Unboxing is quite expensive and should be avoided. I know that i could use

   int.Parse(dreadRoomType["RoomTypeID"].ToString())

instead of

   roomType.RoomTypeID = (int)dreadRoomType["RoomTypeID"];

The question is are there still ways of converting this data in a much more efficient way that both of this option and if there are no possible ways which of the two ways do you prefer to use. Thanks in advance all help and suggestions are accepted :)

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Premature optimization is the root of all evil. –  SLaks Nov 9 '11 at 3:31
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use SqlDataReader.GetInt32() to avoid having to convert/parse to int again, for this you do have to know at what index the integer is within the columns selected though:

roomType.RoomTypeID = dreadRoomType.GetInt32(0);
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+1 to you buddy, Uhmm just a question is 0 in GetInt32 there is a ordinal position of the data. The reason i had used dreadRoomType["RoomTypeID"]; this type of fetching via data reader is fetching data via ordinal positioning is very brittle during maintenance because ordinal positioning may vary due to addition of columns in the underlying table. Thanks –  Allan Chua Nov 9 '11 at 3:22
1  
Agreed - unfortunately you need to know the position to use this method –  BrokenGlass Nov 9 '11 at 3:23
    
@AllanChua: Call GetOrdinal("RoomTypeID") –  SLaks Nov 9 '11 at 3:23
1  
@AllanChua: The difference is that you only have to do this once for each type of query you do - you can cache the index for subsequent queries of the same kind, i.e. using a dictionary –  BrokenGlass Nov 9 '11 at 3:27
1  
This might be undermined, wrt the question, if GetInt32 "unboxes" internally: I am not sure how it is commonly implemented, but if data is internally as object[] then nothing is directly gained... –  user166390 Nov 9 '11 at 3:37
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Boxing isn't that expensive.

Other alternatives won't help; once you have an object, it's already boxed.
String parsing in particular is probably much more expensive than boxing. (although I haven't measured)

If a typed API exists, you can use it to avoid boxing (eg, calling GetInt32).
(although these typed methods are sometimes just wrappers around the untyped method so that they box too)


Bottom line: Don't worry about it.

That guideline is telling you to avoid boxing things in the first place by using typed (generic) collections where possible

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+1 to you buddy. But according to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yz2be5wk.aspx and msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173196.aspx boxing is quite expensive. And another thing with no offense my problem is about unboxing thanks ;) –  Allan Chua Nov 9 '11 at 3:24
    
+1 I agree - compared to the cost of the SQL call itself the boxing/unboxing should not be the bottleneck by a long shot. –  BrokenGlass Nov 9 '11 at 3:24
    
@AllanChua: Unboxing is much cheaper than boxing. Also, once it's boxed, there is no faster alternative to unboxing, unless it's boxed to an interface you can use directly. –  SLaks Nov 9 '11 at 3:31
1  
@AllanChua: It isn't quite expensive. It's 20 times slower than the fastest operation – reference assignment. Don't worry about it; the meaningful parts of your code (DB access, extensive string manipulation, UI, network, disk) are much more expensive. –  SLaks Nov 9 '11 at 3:33
    
@SLaks thanks for the advice buddy :) this kind of stuff really helps to newbies like me :) –  Allan Chua Nov 9 '11 at 3:40
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If boxing/unboxing is "slow" (it really isn't)... why would converting to a string and back not be terribly slow? (It really is a waste: boxing/unboxing is significantly faster.) I would first make sure there is a performance problem, before worrying about it, however...

In my experience, for my data, which includes thousands of items loaded at once, I found that much more performance can be gained with pre-determining the column indices (but do so dynamically with GetOrdinal!), and then I don't worry about the rest :)

For one item, as per this post, I wouldn't even worry about ordinals: it's an entirely different use-case and the "expensive" part is talking to the database.

Happy coding.

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+1 for you buddy for helping out :) uhmm boxing and unboxing is expensive practice according to MSDN see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173196.aspx and msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173196.aspx –  Allan Chua Nov 9 '11 at 3:29
    
@Allan Chua It's "more expensive" than not needing to box/unbox, but this doesn't mean that any significant amount of CPU time will be spent on it. "20 times longer than a simple reference assignment" is still very, very fast (and not to mention, a fast operation compared to all the other overhead of SqlDataReader). Worry about the other 97% of the code first and run a performance analysis to find any hot-spots to optimize :) –  user166390 Nov 9 '11 at 3:31
    
I agree with you. :) sorry coz im still a beginner and still practicing. Uhmm can you give some advice to improve the code itself thanks :) –  Allan Chua Nov 9 '11 at 3:36
1  
@Allan Chua I would use using: using (var dataReader = commRoomTypeSelector.ExecuteReader()) { ... }, since SqlDataReader implements IDisposable and store dreadRoomType["LastEditDate"] to a variable while I decided what to do with it. Since there is only one item here, don't even worry about the oridinals :) –  user166390 Nov 9 '11 at 3:41
    
Yes, I've just learned the use of using keyword :) I'd already implemented it to other classes that I'd worked earlier this morning :) uhmm i guess i would just accept the advice that you guys gave :) –  Allan Chua Nov 9 '11 at 3:51
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Boxing and unboxing are not as expensive as parsing a string and extracting an int. Please profile before doing premature optimization.

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msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173196.aspx but according to MSDN itself boxing and unboxing is very expensive see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/yz2be5wk.aspx –  Allan Chua Nov 9 '11 at 3:28
2  
BMW is expensive... but when compared to a Ferrari it is not that expensive. It is all a matter of perspective :) –  parapura rajkumar Nov 9 '11 at 3:30
    
lol +1 for making me happy :) –  Allan Chua Nov 9 '11 at 3:37
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    private static void GetValue<T>(object o, ref T defaultValue)
    {
        try
        {
            if (defaultValue == null)
            {
                throw new Exception("Default value cannot be null");
            }
            else if (o != null)
            {
                if ((o is T))
                {
                    defaultValue = (T)o;
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            throw;
        }
    }

You can use the above method to Convert an object to any basic data type as follows.
Convert to dateTime

    public static DateTime GetDateTime(object o, DateTime defaultValue)
    {
        try
        {
            GetValue<DateTime>(o, ref defaultValue);
            return defaultValue;
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            throw;
        }
    }

Convert to Integer

    public static int GetInteger(object o, int defaultValue)
    {
        try
        {
            GetValue<int>(o, ref defaultValue);
            return defaultValue;
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            throw;
        }
    }

Refer and download the complete code with all basic data types here http://www.dotnetlines.com/Blogs/tabid/85/EntryId/39/Convert-Object-type-into-its-specific-data-type-using-a-Generic-Method.aspx

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