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OK, this isn't the original program I had this problem in, but I duplicated it in a much smaller one. Very simple problem.

main.cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include <regex>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    regex r1("S");
    printf("S works.\n");
    regex r2(".");
    printf(". works.\n");
    regex r3(".+");
    printf(".+ works.\n");
    regex r4("[0-9]");
    printf("[0-9] works.\n");
    return 0;
}

Compiled successfully with this command, no error messages:

$ g++ -std=c++0x main.cpp

The last line of g++ -v, by the way, is:

gcc version 4.6.1 (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.6.1-9ubuntu3)

And the result when I try to run it:

$ ./a.out 
S works.
. works.
.+ works.
terminate called after throwing an instance of 'std::regex_error'
  what():  regex_error
Aborted

It happens the same way if I change r4 to \\s, \\w, or [a-z]. Is this a problem with the compiler? I might be able to believe that C++11's regex engine has different ways of saying "whitespace" or "word character," but square brackets not working is a stretch. Is it something that's been fixed in 4.6.2?

EDIT:

Joachim Pileborg has supplied a partial solution, using an extra regex_constants parameter to enable a syntax that supports square brackets, but neither basic, extended, awk, nor ECMAScript seem to support backslash-escaped terms like \\s, \\w, or \\t.

EDIT 2:

Using raw strings (R"(\w)" instead of "\\w") doesn't seem to work either.

share|improve this question
    
I haven't used the regex classses yet, but are you sure you're using the correct one? I recall C++11 having several different ways to interpret regex. –  Pubby Nov 9 '11 at 3:42
    
Is there any useful info in the regex_error? –  jswolf19 Nov 9 '11 at 3:49
    
@jswolf19 I don't know how to determine that; exception handling isn't one of my stronger skills. –  Shay Guy Nov 9 '11 at 3:55
    
@jswolf19 there certainly is. in OP's case, it contains regex_constants::error_brack ("mismatched brackets"), although it's not terribly helpful. –  Cubbi Nov 9 '11 at 3:55
3  
Do you know how to catch an exception? If you catch regex_error it will have a method called code() that will return a constant from std::regex_constants::error_type. See en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/regex/error_type for their meanings. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 9 '11 at 5:55
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2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

ECMAScript syntax accepts [0-9], \s, \w, etc, see ECMA-262 (15.10). Here's an example with boost::regex that also uses the ECMAScript syntax by default:

#include <boost/regex.hpp>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
  using namespace boost;
  regex e("[0-9]");
  return argc > 1 ? !regex_match(argv[1], e) : 2;
}

It works:

$ g++ -std=c++0x *.cc -lboost_regex && ./a.out 1

According to the C++11 standard (28.8.2) basic_regex() uses regex_constants::ECMAScript flag by default so it must understand this syntax.

Is this C++11 regex error me or the compiler?

gcc-4.6.1 doesn't support c++11 regular expressions (28.13).

share|improve this answer
    
Like I said in my edit, my current problem is backslashes, not square brackets. And I don't understand your last bit -- I've been using that compiler and some of these regexes have been working. Besides, I don't see any reference on that page to 4.6.1 in particular. –  Shay Guy Nov 9 '11 at 17:27
    
@Shay Guy: 1. ECMAScript syntax also supports backslashes and much more (the syntax is similar to the perl5 regex syntax if it is more familiar to you). 2. If gcc's current trunk (future) doesn't support regular expressions then it follows that gcc-4.6.1 (past) doesn't support it. –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 9 '11 at 22:12
    
I still don't follow. If gcc doesn't support regex, then why did any of these work without throwing an error? Even square brackets worked with some regex_constants parameters, despite backslashes not working right. –  Shay Guy Nov 9 '11 at 23:11
    
@Shay Guy: the status page that I've linked above says that there is partial support for some things. Go to the page, look for 28 (regular expressions section). –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 9 '11 at 23:50
1  
@ShayGuy - This is clearly the correct answer. It is unfortunate that g++'s libstdc++ doesn't yet support full regex's. One solution that leaves your code free to switch away from boost is your own namespace and a bunch of using directives to import the stuff you need from the boost or std namespace. –  Omnifarious Nov 10 '11 at 13:51
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The error is because creating a regex by default uses ECMAScript syntax for the expression, which doesn't support brackets. You should declare the expression with the basic or extended flag:

std::regex r4("[0-9]", std::regex_constants::basic);

Edit Seems like libstdc++ (part of GCC, and the library that handles all C++ stuff) doesn't fully implement regular expressions yet. In their status document they say that Modified ECMAScript regular expression grammar is not implemented yet.

share|improve this answer
    
This makes [0-9] and [a-z] work, but not \\w or \\s. –  Shay Guy Nov 9 '11 at 4:01
2  
That's sort of disappointing. Why did they make the default be something so strange? How annoying. Is there good documentation to be found anywhere on what the various syntaxes are? –  Omnifarious Nov 9 '11 at 4:01
2  
@ShayGuy - This page contains a list of the possible syntaxes: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/regex/syntax_option_type - I bet that ::std::regex_constants::extended would work. –  Omnifarious Nov 9 '11 at 4:03
    
@Omnifarious See en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/regex/syntax_option_type for the different expression types. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 9 '11 at 4:03
6  
-1: ECMAScript supports [0-9]. –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 9 '11 at 6:58
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