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What meaningful HTML tag should be used to create breadcrumbs? I have a menu bar which is created using unsorted list since it is a list:

<ul id="navigation">              
    <li><%= Html.ActionLink("Home", "Index", "Home") %></li>
    <li><%= Html.ActionLink("Contacts", "Index", "Contacts") %></li>
</ul>

Now, I decided to put a breadcrumbs below the menu, the problem is, I don't know what tag should I use. As much as possible, I want to use meaningful tags. Please help me...

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3  
you may wanna take a look at this: css-tricks.com/7802-markup-for-breadcrumbs –  Aziz Nov 9 '11 at 3:49
    
@Aziz that was interesting article, thanks. –  dpp Nov 9 '11 at 4:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you don't want to use an ordered list or paragraph tags, you could always use a nested list to semantically represent the hierarchical nature of the breadcrumbs.

The following example comes from Mark Newhouse's A List Apart article entitled "CSS Design: Taming Lists."

<div id="bread">
<ul>
  <li class="first">Home
  <ul>
    <li>&#187; Products
    <ul>
      <li>&#187; Computers
        <ul>
          <li>&#187; Software</li>
        </ul>
      </li>
    </ul></li>
  </ul></li>
</ul>
</div>
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There's plenty of ways of marking up breadcrumbs. A list is fine. An ordered list is more appropriate for breadcrumbs because it is a list of links in a particular order.

If you don't want to use a list, you could instead leave them as a set of links in a div. Although if you're using HTML5, you may want to put them in a nav element.

Finally, the HTML5 spec suggests using a p element because they could be read as a paragraph of direction on how to get to the particular page.

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After reading this css-tricks.com/7802-markup-for-breadcrumbs I decided not to use UL or LI since they are not apt for the structure. Some comments there said "it could be seen as discrimination if you don’t write semantic code" (to those people who use screen readers). –  dpp Nov 9 '11 at 4:06
    
Thanks by the way. –  dpp Nov 9 '11 at 4:09
1  
@domanokz, if you're worried about accessibility, I highly recommend downloading a dev version of JAWS or Window Eyes and browsing the internet with your monitor turned off. It will really help when you're not sure about semantics. –  zzzzBov Nov 9 '11 at 4:16

Using an unordered list for your breadcrumbs seems perfectly reasonable to me; there isn't always a named tag for every application specific structure and you are displaying a list of breadcrumbs afterall.

You can use css to make the bread crumbs display the way you would like.

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Yeah, I thought of that and ordered list but I'm still into the fact that bread crumbs are not list but a hierarchy like in a tree. –  dpp Nov 9 '11 at 3:57
    
will you be displaying a tree of breadcrumbs at any point? if so, nested lists work pretty well for that too. –  Karl Rosaen Nov 9 '11 at 4:01
    
Nested lists is perfect I guess. Thanks for the time answering. –  dpp Nov 9 '11 at 4:08

Old post but came up high in a search and I think things have changed a bit since this question was originally asked.

In a html5 site I would use the nav tag as breadcrumbs are technically navigation through the site. If you want to make it even more clear what they are you can add microdata to state that they are breadcrumbs.

From Googles example and html5doctor

<nav>
<ul>
    <li itemscope itemtype="http://data-vocabulary.org/Breadcrumb">     
        <a href="http://www.example.com/dresses" itemprop="url">
            <span itemprop="title">Dresses</span>
        </a> 
    </li>
    <li itemscope itemtype="http://data-vocabulary.org/Breadcrumb">
        <a href="http://www.example.com/dresses/real" itemprop="url">
            <span itemprop="title">Real Dresses</span>
        </a> 
    </li>  
    <li itemscope itemtype="http://data-vocabulary.org/Breadcrumb">
        <a href="http://www.example.com/clothes/dresses/real/green" itemprop="url">
            <span itemprop="title">Real Green Dresses</span>
        </a>
    </li>
</ul>

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always checkout Jacob Nielsen: He has recommended the ">" since 2003.

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