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I'm not trying to ask you guys to help me to do homework because i've do much research and also try to program it myself but still i encounter problem and i think so far i've know where the problem is but still no solution can be figure out by me :

The Code

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cmath>

int main(void)
{
 using namespace std;

 int num;
 int max;
 string answer = "";

 cin >> num;

 for(int i = 2 ; i < num ; i++)
 {
     max = sqrt(i);

     if(max < 2) // This must be done beacuse sqrt(2) and sqrt(3) 
     {           // is 1 which will make it become  nonprime.
         answer += i;
         answer += ' ';
         continue;
     }

     for(int j = 2 ; j <= max ; j++) // Trial division ,divide each by integer
     {                               // more than 1 and less than sqrt(oftheinteger)
         if(i % j == 0)
             break;

         else if(j == max)
         {
             answer += i + " ";
             answer += ' ';
         }
     }

  }

         cout <<"The answer is " << answer ;


     return 0;
 }

The Question

1.)This program will prompt for a number from user and return all the prime number before it(e.g if user input 9 : then the answer is 2 , 3 , 5 , 7).

2.)I think the wrong part is the string and integer concatenation , till now i still puzzle how to concat string and integer in C++(Previous Javascript programmer so i'm accustomed to using + as string-int concat operator)

3.)Beside the problem i mention above , so far i've go through the code and find none of other problem exist.If any expert manage to find any , mind to point it out to enlighten me??

4.)If there's any mistake in terms of coding or algorithm or anything done by me , please don't hesitate to point it out , i'm willing to learn.

Thanks for spending time reading my question

share|improve this question
    
What is the error exactly? what does it print out? –  talnicolas Nov 9 '11 at 4:39
    
What does it give you instead of the answer you expect? –  rcollyer Nov 9 '11 at 4:39
    
Does it need to put everything in a string? It would be easier to print each prime number when it's found. –  madth3 Nov 9 '11 at 4:44
    
for the line answer += i; , instead of returning the concatenation of string answer and integer i , it would take the integer + the ascii vale of the string and causes invalid output –  caramel1995 Nov 9 '11 at 5:35

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The usual way to perform formatting in C++ is to use streams.

In this situation, you can use a std::stringstream to accumulate the results, and then convert it into a string when you do the final printing.

Include sstream to get the required type and function declarations:

#include <sstream>

Declare answer to be a std::stringstream instead of a std::string:

stringstream answer;

and then wherever you have:

answer += bla;

, replace it with:

answer << bla;

To get a std::string out of answer, use answer.str():

cout << "The answer is " << answer.str();
share|improve this answer

You can go around the string concatenation problem if you just print what you have so far:

int main()
{
 int num;
 int max;
 string answer = "";

 cin >> num;

 cout << "The answer is ";

 for(int i = 2 ; i < num ; i++)
 {
     max = sqrt((double)i);

     if(max < 2) // This must be done beacuse sqrt(2) and sqrt(3) 
     {           // is 1 which will make it become  nonprime.
         cout << i << ' ';
         continue;
     }

     for(int j = 2 ; j <= max ; j++) // Trial division ,divide each by integer
     {                               // more than 1 and less than sqrt(oftheinteger)
         if(i % j == 0)
             break;

         else if(j == max)
         {
            cout << i << ' ';
         }
     }

  }


     return 0;
}

As other mentioned one way to do concatenation is std::stringstream.

share|improve this answer

If you have to store your complete output before printing it out (I would probably print it as I go, but up to you), a simple way is to use stringstreams.

In this case, rather than answer being an std::string, we can change it to an std::stringstream (and include the <sstream> header).

Now rather than having:

answer += i;

We can just make a simple change and have:

answer << i;

Just as you would if you were printing to cout (which is an ostream).

So basically, += in your code would become <<.

Similar to printing to cout, you can also chain together such as:

answer << a << b


Now to print your stringstream to cout, all you'd need to do is:

cout << my_stringstream.str()


See how you go. I don't want to provide you with the complete since it's homework.

share|improve this answer

it's not very beautiful, but it works. I use a general library "genlib.h", I'm not sure what you use, so you might need to replace that or I can send it to you.

#include "genlib.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cmath>
using namespace std;

bool IsPrime(int num);

int main()
{
    int num;
    int i = 2;

    cout << "Enter an integer to print previous primes up to: ";
    cin >> num;

    cout << endl << "The primes numbers are: " << endl;
    while(i < num){
        if (IsPrime(i) == true){
            cout << i << ", ";
        } 
        i++;
    }
    return 0;
}

bool IsPrime(int num){

    if((num == 2) || (num == 3)) {
        return true;
    }else if ((num % 2) == 0){
        return false;
    }else{
        for (int i = 3; i < sqrt(double(num))+1; i++){
            if ((num % i) == 0){
                return false;
            } 
            return true;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

you need tn convert the integer to string (char*, exactly) using :

answer += itoa(i);

or using standard function :

char str[10];
sprintf(str,"%d",i);
answer += str;

and if you want to avoid using sqrt function, you can replace :

for(int i = 2 ; i < num ; i++)
{
     max = sqrt(i);

with :

for(int i = 2 ; i*i < num ; i++)
{
share|improve this answer
    
I would avoid itoa and sprintf in C++, besides itoa is a non-standard function and using sprintf you should use some secure version of it if your stdlib supports it –  r_ahlskog Nov 9 '11 at 9:07
    
what do you mean by secure version of sprintf ? –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Nov 9 '11 at 12:00
    
sprintf has this annoying ability to overflow the buffer you feed it. The secure version takes an additional parameter specifying the maximum length including the '\0' to put to the buffer. I believe Microsoft calls theirs sprintf_s and C99 seems to declare it to be snprintf –  r_ahlskog Nov 9 '11 at 20:58

The problem is that the + operator of std::string accepts strings as parameter, pointers to an array of chars, or single chars.

When a single char is used in the + operator, then a single char is added to the end of the string.

Your C++ compiler converts the integer to char before passing it to the operator + (both char and int are signed integer values, with different bit number), and therefore your string should contain a strange char instead of the numbers.

You should explicitly convert the integer to string before adding it to the string, as suggested in other answers, or just output everything to std::cout (its operator << accepts also int as parameter and convert them correctly to string).

As a side note, you should receive a warning from the C++ compiler that your integer i has been converted to char when you add it to the string (the integer has been converted to a lower resolution or something like that). This is why is always good to set the warning level to high and try to produce applications that don't generate any warning during the compilation.

share|improve this answer

You could perform a faster lookup by storing your known prime numbers in a set. These two sample functions should do the trick:

#include <iostream>
#include <set>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>

typedef std::set< unsigned int > PrimeNumbers;

bool isComposite(unsigned int n, const PrimeNumbers& knownPrimeNumbers)
{
    PrimeNumbers::const_iterator itEnd = knownPrimeNumbers.end();

    for (PrimeNumbers::const_iterator it = knownPrimeNumbers.begin();
         it != itEnd; ++it)
    {
        if (n % *it == 0)
            return true;
    }
    return false;
}


void findPrimeNumbers(unsigned int n, PrimeNumbers& primeNumbers)
{
    for (unsigned int i = 2; i <= n; ++i)
    {
        if (!isComposite(i, primeNumbers))
            primeNumbers.insert(i);
    }
}

You could then invoke findPrimeNumbers like so:

unsigned int n;

std::cout << "n? ";
std::cin >> n;

PrimeNumbers primeNumbers;
findPrimeNumbers(n, primeNumbers);

And if you really need to dump the result in a string:

std::stringstream stringStream;
int i = 0;
PrimeNumbers::const_iterator itEnd = primeNumbers.end();
for (PrimeNumbers::const_iterator it = primeNumbers.begin();
     it != itEnd; ++it, ++i)
{
    stringStream << *it;
    if (i < primeNumbers.size() - 1)
         stringStream << ", ";
}
std::cout << stringStream.str() << std::endl;

Since you're willing to learn, you can perform both join and split algorithm on string/sequence by using Boost String Algorithms Library.

This solution is not perfect, but it's basic C++ usage (simple containers, no structure, only one typedef, ...). Feel free to compare your results with The First 1000 Primes.

Good luck

share|improve this answer

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