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So here I have singleton list

[([("*" "1"),("/" "5"),("*" "10")],"")]

I have to take the fst $ head of it which is

[("*" "1"),("/" "5"),("*" "10")]

Combine it with a simple string "5", and transform it into

(("*" "10") (("/" "5") (("* "1") "5")))

I know this would involve either foldl or foldr, but I just cant get it right...

This is for a parser project, I could post all the background information, but that would be too much.

Thanks in advance.

EDIT:

this is Haskell btw

Ah, figured this one out

> prods =  do left <- term       
>             right <- many (mul `mplus` div `mplus` mod)
>             return (foldl (\l r -> Call r l) left right)

Don't read too much into it, basically it takes the 5 * 1 / 5 *10 and convert them into ((* 10) ((/ 5) ((* 1) 5)))

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closed as too localized by Tim Post Nov 9 '11 at 15:20

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Is the final result actually meant to be: (("*", "10"), (("/", "5"), (("*", "1"), "5")))? – Mankarse Nov 9 '11 at 4:54
    
nope, you see it as ((* 10) ((/ 5) ((* 1) 5))) which comes out to be 10 – dude Nov 9 '11 at 5:00
5  
It is extremely unclear what your "singleton list" is, exactly. ("*" "1") is not valid Haskell, so it's hard to know how to answer your question since it is unclear what we are working with. – Dan Burton Nov 9 '11 at 8:20

foldl takes a starting value and works from the outermost constructor in, foldr takes a starting value and works from the innermost constructor out.

[1,2,3] -- is just syntactic sugar for 
1:2:3:[] -- or
1:(2:(3:[])) -- or 
cons 1 (cons 2 (cons 3 [])) where cons a as = a:as

One easy way to think of foldr is that

foldr f z (cons 1 (cons 2 (cons 3 []))) = f 1 (f 2 (f 3 z))

foldr just substitutes f for cons and z for []

foldl inverts the data structure, turning it inside out.

foldl f z (cons 1 (cons 2 (cons 3 []))) = f (f (f z 1) 2) 3

So can you see why you'll need foldl?

You'll still need to convert your operator strings ("*", "+", "/") to functions, and your number strings to numbers, since "/" "3" "4" isn't legal haskell application.

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1  
he seems to want to apply it in the opposite order: f 3 (f 2 (f 1 z)) – newacct Nov 9 '11 at 9:32
    
@newacct: Thanks. That's what I get for using SO on my phone. – rampion Nov 9 '11 at 12:27

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