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I want to get the difference between two sets of ints in c#. Given s1 and s2 I want to return those ints which are in s1 and not in s2. I can do something such as:

    List<int> s1 = new List<int>();
    List<int> s2 = new List<int>();

    foreach (int i in s1)
    {
        if (s1.Contains(i))
        {
            //
        }
        else
        {
            //
        }
    }

But I was wondering if anyone can point out anything cleaner. I would like to do something such as

List<int> omitted = s1.Difference(s2);

Not sure if there is an existing method or a LINQ construct that anyone might be able to point out? Thank you.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I think you want HashSet.Except. That is, rather than use Lists, use HashSets, and then the operation is available. This is a better type if what you are representing is really a 'set' anyway. (If you already have a list, you can just create a 'new HashSet' out of it.)

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awesome thankyou. Except() is the method I was looking for and I take your advice on HashSets. –  SiC Apr 30 '09 at 9:54
    
Except is an extension function, no? –  leppie Apr 30 '09 at 9:54
    
There is an extension method Enumerable.Except for all IEnumerables. But HashSet has a method Except specifically for HashSets. –  Brian Apr 30 '09 at 9:58
    
Except is indeed an extension method that operates on any IEnumerable (see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…). That means it works fine on List<T>. Of course, if order doesn't matter HashSet /is/ a more appropriate type. –  Matthew Flaschen Apr 30 '09 at 10:08
3  
Brian, I don't think so. The method you linked above is the extension method. HashSet has a ExceptWith method that destructively removes the elements in the parameter from the instance HashSet, but no Except. –  Matthew Flaschen Apr 30 '09 at 10:13
IEnumerable<T> a, b;

var added = a.Except(b);
var removed = b.Except(a);
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1  
Note that this uses Enumerable.Except, so you need to use System.Linq. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb300779.aspx –  Brian Apr 30 '09 at 9:56
    
Is that a problem? :) –  leppie Apr 30 '09 at 9:57
1  
Problem? No, I just wanted to help someone out who might cut-and-paste this code and find that it doesn't compile. –  Brian Apr 30 '09 at 10:00
3  
@Brian, The same caveat also applies to your own answer. HashSet doesn't implement it's own Except method, so your answer requires System.Linq too. –  LukeH Apr 30 '09 at 10:22
    
my answer requires no LINQ so there!! lol –  Chad Grant May 1 '09 at 4:47
List<int> s1 = new List<int>();
List<int> s2 = new List<int>();

return sl.FindAll( i => !s2.Contains(i) )
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from x in s1
where ! s2.contains(x)
select x
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