Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am learning java and right now i am stuck at memory allocation of object's and local variables. can any one illustrate or clear some of my doubts??

  1. I read about Heap and Stack Memory for Object's instance Variable's and Local Variable's. I have question that weather a new STACK is being created for each method?? or for each class of a single stack is used by a whole class??
  2. I had read that ONE STACK is being created by every thread What is means

Thanks Mahaveer

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted
  • Each thread has a private stack.
  • Each method has a private stack frame within that thread's stack.

Stacks are associated with thread in a one-to-one mapping. Stacks are absolutely not associated with methods and classes.

The way to reason about all this is that the local variables of a method are private to each invocation of that method.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks @David. But still i have one doubt is when we say Local variables are stored in stack memory what it means ?? –  Mahaveer Muttha Nov 9 '11 at 7:38
    
It means that local variables are stored in the private stack frame of the executing method in question. –  David Heffernan Nov 9 '11 at 7:39
    
you are saying that Each Method has a private Stack Frame then where the local variables get stored that method uses?? weather the new stack is created for variables?? –  Mahaveer Muttha Nov 9 '11 at 7:40
4  
Each invocation of a method has a private stack frame. If the method runs on two different threads then there are two distinct stack frames, one for each invocation. –  David Heffernan Nov 9 '11 at 7:41

Every thread has it's own stack.

  • Whenever you use new, an object is created on the heap.
  • Local variables are stored on the stack. That includes primitives (such as int) and the references to any objects created. The actual objects themselves aren't created on the stack, as I mentioned when you use new they'll be created on the heap.

I have question that weather a new STACK is being created for each method??

The same stack is being used when a method is called. A method will create it's own little section on the stack called a "stack frame" that's used to hold it's local variables.

It's just like a stack of plates, when a method is called a plate is added to the top of the stack (a stack frame), and when that method ends the plate is removed from the stack. All of that method's local variables will be destroyed with it, but the actual objects created with new won't.

The JVM's garbage collector will look after destroying objects on the heap (the one's created with new) when it sees you no longer need them.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks AusCBloke for a simple illustration. as you said that he same stack is being used when a method is called. A method will create it's own little section on the stack called a "stack frame" that's used to hold it's local variables. it means stack frame is devided into two parts in one it holds method call and in other it holds variables.. Am I right?? or does it goes in different way?? –  Mahaveer Muttha Nov 9 '11 at 7:46
    
@MahaveerMuttha a stack frame is basically a method's own little temporary space of memory where it can hold it's local variables. When that method calls another method, that other method's stack frame gets created on top and the execution goes to that new method. When the second method ends, it's frame will be destroyed (pulled off the stack) and the first one will continue as if nothing different has happened. The stack will be in the same condition as it was before the second method was called. –  AusCBloke Nov 9 '11 at 7:49
    
thanks @AusCBloke. now i got what exactly happens..:) –  Mahaveer Muttha Nov 9 '11 at 7:56

Ofcourse, java garbage collector always takes care of the Heap, when it gets a chance to be executed, so it only looks for orphan objects and wipes them out, that's why NEW keyword in java always creates new objects on the Heap memory.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.