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I'm trying to import the threading module, however, i just seem to get errors for no good reason. Here is my code:

import threading

class TheThread ( threading.Thread ):
    def run ( self ):
        print 'Insert some thread stuff here.'
        print 'I\'ll be executed...yeah....'
        print 'There\'s not much to it.'

TheThread.Start()

And the errors:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "threading.py", line 1, in <module>
    import threading
  File "C:\Users\Trent\Documents\Scripting\Python\Threading\threading.py", line
3, in <module>
    class TheThread ( threading.Thread ):
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'Thread'
Press any key to continue . . .

Python stats:

Python 2.7.2 (default, Jun 12 2011, 15:08:59) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)] on win 32

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2  
Do you have file named "threading.py" in your current directory? If so, this would probably be the cause of there being no Thread attribute. –  Tyler Crompton Nov 9 '11 at 9:07
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

i think that all you need is just to rename the name of your working file, because your file name is the same as module name:

threading.py

or you have wrong threading.py file in your working directory

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I'm confused as to why this answer didn't exist when I left my comment above. Anyway, you beat me to it. –  Tyler Crompton Nov 9 '11 at 9:19
1  
silly me not to noteice that the file was same name as module :/ –  Trent Nov 9 '11 at 9:22
    
Tyler, i answered, then temporary deleted answer to simulate this situation on my computer:) –  FoRever_Zambia Nov 9 '11 at 9:24
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First, you have to rename your own file: It is called threading.py and since it is in the Python Path it replaces the threading module of the standard Python library.

Second, you have to create an instance of your thread-class:

TheThread().start() # start with latter case
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2  
+1 for pointing out the next error that would arise. –  Tyler Crompton Nov 9 '11 at 9:20
    
Yep :D too true –  Trent Nov 9 '11 at 9:43
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_thread.start_new_thread(func*)

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