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i have a program that renders things out of .raw files, here is a sample:

1.000000 1.000000 -1.000000 1.000000 -1.000000 -1.000000 -1.000000 -1.000000 -1.000000 -1.000000 1.000000 -1.000000 
1.000000 0.999999 1.000000 -1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 -1.000000 -1.000000 1.000000 0.999999 -1.000001 1.000000 
1.000000 1.000000 -1.000000 1.000000 0.999999 1.000000 0.999999 -1.000001 1.000000 1.000000 -1.000000 -1.000000 
1.000000 -1.000000 -1.000000 0.999999 -1.000001 1.000000 -1.000000 -1.000000 1.000000 -   1.000000 -1.000000 -1.000000 
-1.000000 -1.000000 -1.000000 -1.000000 -1.000000 1.000000 -1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 - 1.000000 1.000000 -1.000000 
1.000000 0.999999 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 -1.000000 -1.000000 1.000000 -1.000000 -1.000000 1.000000 1.000000 

These are just faces of a cube, my problem is, this file is 650 bytes, now when I load the program, the program takes up 20mb. It's not that much of a problem, but when loading much bigger files, it can become a big problem.

Here is the code for my file phraser (sorry if it's messy, I'm resonably new to C++):

/*
 * PhraseObj.cpp
 *
 *  Created on: Nov 5, 2011
 *      Author: tom
 */

#include "PhraseObj.h"

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include "obj.h"

PhraseObj::PhraseObj(string file)
{
    FILE.open(file.c_str());
    cout << FILE.is_open() << "\n";
}

obj PhraseObj::getObj()
{
    string line;
    Polygon P;
    vertex V;
    obj O;
    int place;
    int NextPos;
    float x;
    float y;
    float z;
    getline(FILE, line);
    while (!FILE.eof()) {

        cout << "new line" << "\n";

        place = 0;
        while (place != string::npos) {
            if (place == (line.length() - 1)) {
                break;
            }

            NextPos = line.find(" ", place + 1);
            line.substr(place, (NextPos - place) - 1);
            cout << line.substr(place, (NextPos - place) - 1).c_str() << " ";
            x =::atof(line.substr(place, (NextPos - place) - 1).c_str());

            V.x(x);
            cout << x << "\n";

            place = NextPos;
            NextPos = line.find(" ", place + 1);
            line.substr(place, NextPos - place);
            cout << line.substr(place + 1, (NextPos - place) - 1).c_str() << " ";
            y =::atof(line.substr(place + 1, (NextPos - place) - 1).c_str());
            V.y(y);
            cout << y << "\n";

            place = NextPos;
            NextPos = line.find(" ", place + 1);
            line.substr(place + 1, NextPos - place);
            cout << line.substr(place + 1, (NextPos - place) - 1).c_str() << " ";
            z =::atof(line.substr(place + 1, (NextPos - place) - 1).c_str());
            V.z(z);
            cout << z << "\n";

            P.addPoint(V);
            place = line.find(" ", place + 1);
            cout << "place: " << place << " " << "length:" << line.length() << "\n";
        }
        getline(FILE, line);
        O.AddPolygon(P);
    }
    cout << "returning" << "\n";
    try {
        return O;
    }
    catch(bad_alloc & ba) {
        cout << "bad_alloc caught: " << ba.what() << endl;
    }
}

void PhraseObj::closeFile()
{
    FILE.close();
}

bool PhraseObj::isEnd()
{
    return FILE.eof();
}

A few side notes, a vertex is an x, y, and z float.
A polygon is a vector of vertex's.
A obj is a vector of polygon's.

Thanks, Tom.

and vertex.h:

/*
 * vertex.h
 *
 *  Created on: Oct 26, 2011
 *      Author: tom
 */

#ifndef VERTEX_H_
#define VERTEX_H_


class vertex {
float x_;
float y_;
float z_;
public:
//here are some getters
float x() {return x_;} ;
float y() {return y_;} ;
float z() {return z_;} ;
// and now for some setters
void x(float _x) {x_ = _x;} ;
void y(float _y) {y_ = _y;} ;
void z(float _z) {z_ = _z;} ;
};


#endif /* VERTEX_H_ */

and polygon.cpp:

/*
 * Polygon.cpp
 *
 *  Created on: Oct 26, 2011
 *      Author: tom
 */

#include "Polygon.h"


using namespace std;

void Polygon::addPoint(vertex V) {
point.push_back(V);
}

int Polygon::getNumOfPoints() {
return point.size();
}

 vertex Polygon::getPoint(int I) {
return point.at(I);
 }
share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried it for larger files? How big is the overhead there? Is it constant or proportional? – Björn Pollex Nov 9 '11 at 9:11
    
Showing us the contents of your header file would be helpful. – CadentOrange Nov 9 '11 at 9:11
1  
650 bytes on disk is 650 on memory. Your problem lies elsewhere. – FailedDev Nov 9 '11 at 9:13
    
thanks for the reply's i tried it with a 62kb sphere, i went up to 50mb and then with a model of a minecraft map, 15mb which filled up so much ram, it almost crash my pc – Tom Merry Nov 9 '11 at 9:28
    
Those things are called PARSERS, not PHRASERS, just FYI. – datenwolf Nov 9 '11 at 9:49

I don't know why you're seeing such excessive memory usage, so this is not exactly an answer to your question but I'd like to point out that you can simplify your PhraseObj::getObj() function a lot by using a std::istringstream and std::istream_iterator objects:

obj PhraseObj::getObj()
{
    obj O;
    string line;
    while ( getline( FILE, line ) ) {
        istringstream vertices( line );
        istream_iterator<double> it( vertices ), end;

        Polygon p;
        for ( int i = 0; i < 4; ++i ) {
            Vertex v;
            v.x( *it++ );
            v.y( *it++ );
            v.z( *it++ );
            p.addPoint( v );
        }

        O.AddPolygon( p );
    }        
}

Instead of going from one space character to the next using std::string methods, you can stick the string into an istringstream object and then use istream_iterator<double> objects to iterate the separate vertices. If you know that you always have 12 coordinates vertices per line (three per vertex, four vertices per polygon) then you can use a simply loop to read them.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, i normally program in java and am just starting to learn all the cool fetures that C++ has to offer. this will come in handy. – Tom Merry Nov 9 '11 at 9:37

By the looks of it, your code isn't that bad. The only problem I see is, that you create a lot of intermediary objects, each calling some memory allocation (since you've used RAII, good!), this doesn't cause memory leaks. BUT modern memory allocators don't give freed memory back to the operating system immediately, but retain it, for further allocation requests to answer from there. So you may simply have experienced that.

Of course you should avoid creating those unneeded intermediaries. For example your code contains numerous line.substr(place + 1, NextPos - place); where you don't assign the resulting string to anything. So a std::string comes to life and is destructed without being ever used.

You should also avoid such excessive debug output, because this will slow down your program severly. It's okay for debugging purposes, but once working you should remove or desable it.

share|improve this answer

If you save it as a binary representation of floats, your file sizes, load times, parse times, memory, etc. will go down dramatically.

Just use your current parser to output a new file as binary floats (perhaps create a custom build script). Then you can have a smaller/faster distro, and move the conversion to in house.

share|improve this answer

The only issue that I can see is that you are testing for EOF after reading with getline(), you should change your while loop with a do... while. Apart from that, this code is not the relevant one to show us. Probably the class declarations for Polygon and Vertex have the great opportunities to run with memory leaks... are you using vector<> from STL?

Another thing you have to take into account, as you haven't told how you reached the conclusion of too much memory being wasted. Maybe these 20 Mb are part of the standard memory given to any process in your operating system. If you want to really know how memory is being used, you need a profiling tool, such as valgrind, for example.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the reply's i tried it with a 62kb sphere, i went up to 50mb and then with a model of a minecraft map, 15mb which filled up so much ram, it almost crash my pc. i said this in a comment above, yes i think i am using the stl vector<>,here is the headder for the vertex – Tom Merry Nov 9 '11 at 9:31

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