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How can I implement the code in the catch block?

  try
    {
       // Call a MS SQL stored procedure (MS SQL 2000)
       // Stored Procedure may deadlock 
    }
    catch
    {
       // if deadlocked Call a MS SQL stored procedure (may deadlock again)
       // If deadlocked, keep trying until stored procedure executes
    }
    finally
    {

    }
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So if you land in the catch you want to reexecute the try? – Tudor Nov 9 '11 at 9:33
up vote 14 down vote accepted

Doing this isn't recommended and could cause serious problems in your program. For example, what if the database was down?

But, here's how to do it in a loop:

for(int attempts = 0; attempts < 5; attempts++)
// if you really want to keep going until it works, use   for(;;)
{
    try
    {
        DoWork();
        break;
    }
    catch { }
    Thread.Sleep(50); // Possibly a good idea to pause here, explanation below
}

Update: As Mr. Disappointment mentioned in a comment below: The Thread.Sleep method pauses the execution for the specified number of milliseconds. No error is completely random, most that would work simply by trying again only work because something has changed in the time it took between the tries. Pausing the execution of the thread will give a much bigger window of opportunity for this to happen (for example, more time for the database engine to start up).

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+1 for the statement "Doing this isn't recommended and could cause serious problems" – Fischermaen Nov 9 '11 at 9:35
    
And if you are going to do this, a period of "sleep" before the next try might be recommended - checking for a database when the engine is starting up, for instance, would result in five tries whizzing past before it had a chance. – Grant Thomas Nov 9 '11 at 9:38
    
An excellent point. I'll add that in the answer with reasons. Thanks – Connell Watkins Nov 9 '11 at 9:39
    
If the database were down, the failure will occur before reaching this particular try block. Like the idea of a limited number of tries & the pause before retry. Thanks. – AAsk Nov 9 '11 at 10:51

What about something like this

bool retry = true;
while( retry ){
  try{
    ...
    retry = false;
  }
  catch
  {
    ...
  }
  finally
  {
    ...
  }
}

As long as the last line of the try block gets run ( retry = false ), it will carry on. If some exception occurs, it will run the catch and finally block, and then loop back up and run the try block again.

If you want to only try x times, you can replace the retry with a int with a startvalue of number of tries first. Then check if it equals 0 in the while loop, decrement it in the start of the loop, and set it to 0 as the last line of the try block.

And you should of course do something to that empty catch block so it catches the exceptions you anticipate, and not one that catches everything.

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1  
This is bad logic as you could get caught into an infinite loop, if it continues to fail. Always use timers or tickers when using a unknown count loop. – Switch Apr 23 '13 at 17:23

Don't implement it in the catch block. Instead write a loop around it that repeats until either it was successful or some limit is reached.

Something like:

bool quit = false;
int loopcount = 0;
while(!quit )
{
   try
   {
       // execute the command, might throw an exception)
       quit = true; // no exception if you got here
   }
   catch(Exception ex)
   {
      if (ex != deadlock) // doesn't work like this :-(
        quit = true;
   }
   finally
   {
      // etc.
   }
   loopcount++;
   if (loopcount > 3)
      quit = true;
}
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It may be as simple as wrapping the whole try/catch in a while loop:

while (!success) {

    try
    {
       // Call a MS SQL stored procedure (MS SQL 2000)
       // Stored Procedure may deadlock 
       success = true;
    }
    catch
    {
       // if deadlocked Call a MS SQL stored procedure (may deadlock again)
       // If deadlocked, keep trying until stored procedure executes
       success = false;
    }

}
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This is also bad logic as you could get caught into an infinite loop, if it continues to fail. Always use timers or tickers when using a unknown count loop. – Switch Apr 23 '13 at 17:24

You really shouldn't just hammer the database until it succeeds in executing your SP, but that's another story.

You could do it like this:

Boolean succeeded = false;

while (!succeeded)
{

    try
    {
        // Call a MS SQL stored procedure (MS SQL 2000)
        // Stored Procedure may deadlock 
        succeeded = true;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // Log
    }
}
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1  
This will always only run once right? finally will get called if an exception gets thrown or not, and set succeeded to true, causing the while loop to abort. – Øyvind Bråthen Nov 9 '11 at 9:37
    
I see, answer updated. – CodeCaster Nov 9 '11 at 9:39
    
That's more like it ;) – Øyvind Bråthen Nov 9 '11 at 13:03

You can implement Timers to check the healthy of your store procedures, and throw answers based on that, inside a loop as the colleagues said.

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