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For locking I am using a single static object which is global to my application:

public class MvcApplication : System.Web.HttpApplication
{        
    public static readonly object AppLock = new object();
    ...
}

Using it for locking in code:

lock(MvcApplication.AppLock)
{
    ...
}

Let us not consider performance impact for a moment. Can I be 100% sure that I will avoid deadlock in this case?

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The definition of a deadlock is as L.B posted below. Are you sure that's what you are safeguarding against? If not, what situation do you need to avoid? –  Kieren Johnstone Nov 9 '11 at 11:38
    
I want to use this technique to avoid any kind of deadlocks in my application. –  Evgeny Nov 9 '11 at 14:12
    
Of course, given that all locks in my app use MvcApplication.AppLock object only. –  Evgeny Nov 9 '11 at 14:18
    
I don't think you understand a deadlock then. If you're adding a lock to remove deadlocks, then you don't understand that for a deadlock you need to have two locks to begin with. Or are you talking about SQL Server deadlocks, something very different? –  Kieren Johnstone Nov 9 '11 at 15:41
    
Oh, sorry for confusion. I meant that I have more than one lock block in my web application, a lot of them, actually. I just wanted to make sure that it would not deadlock in any condition. And yes, I meant only my C# code in asp.net mvc project, not the sql deadlock. –  Evgeny Nov 10 '11 at 11:36
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1 Answer

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can not create a deadlock conditon just with one lock-object(AppLock) See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deadlock . But it is possible with this kind of codes in threads

lock(A)
   lock(B)
       DoSomething();


lock(B)
   lock(A)
       DoSomething();
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