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what is difference between abstract class and non abstract class when extending derived classes?.Both class i didn't used the method overriding and abstract methods(i..e abstract class).Just I inherited the properties.What and why did prefer the class?

Ex:- Code 1:-

abstract class a{  protected int empnno; protected String empname } 
class b extends a { ...}

Code 2:-

class a{  protected int empnno; protected String empname }
class b extends a { ...}
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10  
You should accept answers to you previous questions before people would be included to help you further –  Aleks G Nov 9 '11 at 11:27

6 Answers 6

what is difference to extend abstract class and non abstract class?

There's no difference, except that abstract classes may have abstract methods. Abstract methods are methods without implementations and these must be implemented by your subclass (unless you make your subclass abstract too).

Since your a class have no abstract methods, there is no different what so ever from a subclass-perspective. (The only difference is that a may no longer be instantiated.)

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An abstract method is a method that is declared without an implementation (without braces, and followed by a semicolon), like this:

abstract void moveTo(double deltaX, double deltaY);  

If a class includes abstract methods, the class itself must be declared abstract, as in:

public abstract class GraphicObject {
   // declare fields
   // declare non-abstract methods
   abstract void draw();
}

An abstract class is a class that is declared abstract—it may or may not include abstract methods. Abstract classes cannot be instantiated, but they can be subclassed
Difference :-
Abstract classes cannot be instantiated
An normal class can't have abstract method..
Your Code: The difference B/w Code1 and code2 is with code is code1's property can use only by inheritance
but in code2 u can make its object and use there property with there object..

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Actually they are the same, but you cannot instanciate Abstract classes. So if you want nobody tries to instanciate your class, you would like to make it Abstract.

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You should have a look at the tutorials on oracle.com:

http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/IandI/abstract.html

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An abstract class will contain abstract methods that do not have an implementation.

When you extend this class, sometimes you may decide only to provide implementations for some of those abstract methods. In this case you've extended an abstract class and yet the subclass is still abstract.

If you implement all the abstract methods, your subclass is typically not abstract (although there's nothing stopping you from declaring it as such, AFAIK).

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1  
An abstract class will contain abstract methods that do not have an implementation. -- No, not necessarily. –  aioobe Nov 9 '11 at 11:36

Suppose there is a class B, and class A, where A extends be. The following are the possible scenarios:

1. B is abstract

1.1. B doesn't have abstract methods

1.1.1. A is abstract

1.1.1.1. You don't want to instantiate A. Everything is fine.

1.1.1.2. You want to instantiate A. That's not possible, you can't create abstract objects

1.1.2. A is not abstract. Everything is fine

1.2. B has at least an abstract method

1.2.1. A is abstract

1.2.1.1. You don't want to instantiate A. Everything is fine.

1.2.1.2. You want to instantiate A. That's not possible, you can't create abstract objects

1.2.2. A is not abstract

1.2.2.1. A doesn't implement all the abstract methods. You can't run your project until you change this

1.2.2.2. A implements all the abstract methods. Everything is fine.

2. B is not abstract

2.1. A is abstract

2.1.1. You want to instantiate A. Error.

2.1.2. You don't want to instantiate A. No problem

2.2. A is not abstract. No problem.
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