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I'm using this is_enum function to check if a variable is an enum or not. (See error below)

#include <boost/type_traits/is_enum.hpp>
#include <boost/static_assert.hpp>

template<typename T>
void is_enum(T)
{
    BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(boost::is_enum<T>::value == true);
}

int main()
{
    char c = 'a';
    is_enum(c);
    return 0;
}

This gives me the following error:

-*- mode: compilation; default-directory: "/home/epronk/enums/" -*-
Compilation started at Thu Nov 10 21:20:05

g++ -I /home/epronk/src/boost_1_47_0/ q.cpp
q.cpp: In function ‘void is_enum(T) [with T = char]’:
q.cpp:13:   instantiated from here
q.cpp:7: error: invalid application of ‘sizeof’ to incomplete type ‘boost::STATIC_ASSERTION_FAILURE<false>’ 
q.cpp:7: error: invalid application of ‘sizeof’ to incomplete type ‘boost::STATIC_ASSERTION_FAILURE<false>’ 

Compilation exited abnormally with code 1 at Thu Nov 10 21:20:05

(not sure why g++ (Debian 4.4.5-8) 4.4.5 give me the same error twice)

Is it possible to change this function so it becomes a warning?

For a char you can try to assign 256 to it which results in a overflow error.

edited

Some context: I want to find switch statements like this one.

#define switch(arg) \
is_enums(arg); \
switch(arg)

int main()
{
    char c = Red;

    switch(c)
    {
    case Banana: // No warning
        break;
    case Red:
        break;
    case Green:
        break;
    case Blue:
        break;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
You mean a compile-time warning? What would that be useful for - you'd want to compile the non-enum case anyway, your code doesn't assume enum anywhere? –  Rup Nov 9 '11 at 11:38
    
I want to find the switch / case statements that use an int or char to switch on. –  Eddy Pronk Nov 9 '11 at 11:51
    
Isn't your question then 'how to find switch statements using an int to switch on?' Maybe there are other ways to do this. –  rve Nov 9 '11 at 12:11
    
I'm happy with the solution of @Edric but, feel free to edit the question, ask a follow-up or suggest a follow-up question here. –  Eddy Pronk Nov 9 '11 at 12:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

EDIT: Try BOOST_STATIC_WARNING http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_46_1/libs/serialization/doc/static_warning.html; the code below is my hand-hacked version of doing something similar.

Something like this:

#include <boost/type_traits/is_enum.hpp>
#include <boost/utility.hpp>
#include <boost/static_assert.hpp>

enum AB { A, B };

template<typename T>
typename boost::enable_if_c< boost::is_enum<T>::value,
                             void >::type is_enum(T) {
}

template<typename T>
typename boost::enable_if_c< !boost::is_enum<T>::value,
                             void >::type is_enum(T) {
    int NOT_AN_ENUMERATION = 1;
}

int main()
{
    char c = 'a';
    is_enum(c);
    is_enum(A);
    is_enum(B);
    return 0;
}

Will issue a warning about the unused variable if you get your compiler in the right state. With gcc and '-Wall', I get this sort of thing:

thing.cpp: In function 'typename boost::enable_if_c<(! boost::is_enum::value), void>::type is_enum(T) [with T = char]':
thing.cpp:21:   instantiated from here
thing.cpp:15: warning: unused variable 'NOT_AN_ENUMERATION'
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Fantastic! Would it be possible to generalize this and invent BOOST_STATIC_WARNING as suggested by @kerrek-sb ? –  Eddy Pronk Nov 9 '11 at 12:11
    
Oh dear, no need to invent BOOST_STATIC_WARNING as it already exists! boost.org/doc/libs/1_46_1/libs/serialization/doc/… –  Edric Nov 9 '11 at 12:31
    
Yes, I was really surprised when I saw the answer of @abir. –  Eddy Pronk Nov 9 '11 at 12:36

The error is intentional, since you call a static assert, which means exactly "please trigger a compile-time error if the condition is false".

Your function is strangely named, though: It's not a conditional check whether the variable is an enum, but rather an assertion that it is. You should call it assert_that_var_is_enum_or_die() or something meaningful like that.

A conditional should probably just be:

inline bool is_enum(T) { return boost::is_enum<T>::value; }
share|improve this answer
1  
Can the static assert be replaced with something that generates a warning on the line where I instantiate it? –  Eddy Pronk Nov 9 '11 at 11:40
    
Like a static_warn :-) Not sure; warnings aren't part of the C++ standard. Some compilers offer them as extensions (such as GCC's #warning). You could put that in another template (specialized on a bool) I suppose. –  Kerrek SB Nov 9 '11 at 11:42
    
Sorry, that was nonsense. Preprocessor directives cannot possibly be the answer, as they are processed before the compile stage. You'd need to find a platform-specific piece of code that triggers a warning and invoke that inside a template specialization, or something like that. –  Kerrek SB Nov 9 '11 at 11:53
    
Exactly. I was thinking template specialization, but a concrete idea is missing. Assigning 256 to a char might be a hint for the char specialization. Feel free to change the question title. :) –  Eddy Pronk Nov 9 '11 at 12:02
    
@EddyPronk: Well, the concrete idea is that you need to "trigger a warning", but there's no universal way of doing that; and in any event, the warning wouldn't be very self-documenting (unless you can bring some meaningful function name into it)... once you have warning-generating code, it needs to be wrapped so that it is only triggered at instantiation time. –  Kerrek SB Nov 9 '11 at 12:04

If you are using boost, you can use BOOST_STATIC_WARNING defined in header <boost/serialization/static_warning.hpp>. If that does not work on your compiler you can use BOOST_SERIALIZATION_BSW defined in same header. Example code looks like BOOST_SERIALIZATION_BSW(std::is_enum<T>::value,1); where the second parameter is an unique integer. The implementation is conceptually same as BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT except that it uses compiler specific warning such as "negative integer to unsigned conversion" for generation purpose.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Maybe this is even better. –  Eddy Pronk Nov 9 '11 at 12:31

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