Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can you explain the difference between == and ===, giving some useful examples?

share|improve this question
4  
Would you mind editing so that the question explains in search terms, "double equal sign" and "three equals signs" or something like that? –  random Feb 9 '10 at 10:51
    
    
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 224 down vote accepted

== compares the values of variables for equality, type casting as necessary. === checks if the two variables are of the same type AND have the same value.

A full explanation of the differences are available in the PHP manual.

Here's a table I put together showing how some variables compare to each other.

// "===" means that they are identical  
// "==" means that they are equal  
// "!=" means that they aren't equal.

         false   null    array()  0      "0"     0x0     "0x0"   "000"    "0000"
false    ===     ==      ==       ==      ==     ==      !=      !=       !=    
null     ==      ===     ==       ==      !=     ==      !=      !=       !=    
array()  ==      ==      ===      !=      !=     !=      !=      !=       !=    
0        ==      ==      !=       ===     ==     ===     ==      ==       ==    
"0"      ==      !=      !=       ==      ===    ==      ==      ==       ==    
0x0      ==      ==      !=       ===     ==     ===     ==      ==       ==    
"0x0"    !=      !=      !=       ==      ==     ==      ===     ==       ==    
"000"    !=      !=      !=       ==      ==     ==      ==      ===      ==    
"0000"   !=      !=      !=       ==      ==     ==      ==      ==       ===   
share|improve this answer
35  
This works much the same in Javascript, btw. –  Raithlin Sep 17 '08 at 7:11
21  
does anyone else find it strange that "000" == "0000" ? –  nickf Sep 17 '08 at 13:08
9  
What always suprises me is that false == array(), and false == 0 but array() != 0, so false == array() !=/== 0? that feels weird to me. –  Pim Jager Aug 17 '09 at 11:50
3  
@Pim ...continued: Look at it this way: Casting to a BOOL, any value only has to fall on one of two sides, true or false. That's easy to cast. All other values though have, for all practical purposes, virtually unlimited combinations. Is "five" == 5? array(0) == 0? array(0,0,0) == 0? 0.0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001 == array()? –  deceze Aug 17 '09 at 12:56
3  
@Raithlin, careful of array. triple equals gives false for different arrays in javascript, but true for PHP as long as their values are equal. –  Pacerier Aug 2 '13 at 10:34
show 11 more comments

In regards to Javascript

The === operator works the same as the == operator but requires that its operands have not only the same value, but also the same data type.

For example the sample below will display 'x and y are equal' but not 'x and y are identical'

var x = 4;
var y = '4';
if (x == y) {
    alert('x and y are equal');
}
if (x === y) {
    alert('x and y are identical');
}
share|improve this answer
    
Upvoted, as this seems to be exactly the same situation for php. –  David Thomas Aug 17 '09 at 13:40
    
@DavidThomas It's not exactly the same.See stackoverflow.com/questions/12598407/… –  xdazz May 4 '13 at 12:45
add comment

It's all about data types. Take a BOOL (true or false) for example:

true also equals 1 and false also equals 0

the == does not care about the data types when comparing: so if you had a var that is 1 (which could also be true):

$var=1;

and then compare with the ==:

if ( $var == true )
{
echo"var is true";
}

But $var does not actually equal true, does it? It has the int value of 1 instead, which in turn, is equal to true.

With ===, the data types are checked to make sure the two vars/objects/whatever are using the same type.

So if i did:

if ( $var === true )
{
echo"var is true";
}

That condition would not be true, as $var!==true it only == true (if you know what I mean).

Why would you need this?

Simple - Let's take a look at one of PHP's functions: array_search():

the array_search() function simply searches for a value in an array, and returns the key of the element the value was found in. If the value could not be found in the array, it returns false. But, what if you did an array_search() on a value that was stored in the first element of the array (which would have the array key of 0)....the array_search() function would return 0...which is equal to false..

So if you did:

$arr=array("name");
if (array_search("name",$arr)==false)
{
//this would return 0 (the key of the element the val was found in) but because we're using ==, we'll think the function actually returned false...when it didn't.
}

So, do you see how this could be an issue now?

Most people don't use == false when checking if a function returns false. Instead, they use the !. But actually, this is exactly the same as using ==false, so if you did:

$arr=array("name");
if (!array_search("name",$arr))//this is the same as doing (array_search("name",$arr)==false)

So for things like that, you would use the === instead, so that the data type is checked.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Given x = 5

1) Operator : == is "equal to". x == 8 is false
2) Operator : === is "exactly equal to" (value and type) x === 5 is true, x === "5" is false

share|improve this answer
add comment

You would use === to test whether a function or variable is false rather than just equating to false (zero or an empty string).

$needle = 'a';
$haystack = 'abc';
$pos = strpos($haystack, $needle);
if ($pos === false) {
    echo $needle . ' was not found in ' . $haystack;
} else {
    echo $needle . ' was found in ' . $haystack . ' at location ' . $pos;
}

In this case strpos would return 0 which would equate to false in the test

if ($pos == false)

or

if (!$pos)

which is not what you want here.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Variables have a type and a value.

  • $var = "test" is a string that contain "test"
  • $var2 = 24 is an integer vhose value is 24.

When you use these variables (in PHP), sometimes you don't have the good type. For example, if you do

if ($var == 1) {... do something ...}

PHP have to convert ("to cast") $var to integer. In this case, "$var == 1" is true because any non-empty string is casted to 1.

When using ===, you check that the value AND THE TYPE are equal, so "$var === 1" is false.

This is useful, for example, when you have a function that can return false (on error) and 0 (result) :

if(myFunction() == false) { ... error on myFunction ... }

This code is wrong as if myFunction() returns 0, it is casted to false and you seem to have an error. The correct code is :

if(myFunction() === false) { ... error on myFunction ... }

because the test is that the return value "is a boolean and is false" and not "can be casted to false".

share|improve this answer
    
regarding non-empty strings, that's actually not true. "a" == 0 is TRUE. –  nickf Sep 17 '08 at 7:56
add comment

protected by Shankar Damodaran Feb 22 at 9:24

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.